diabetestalk.net

Starvation Ketosis And Pregnancy

Of 'fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis'

Of 'fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis'

TI A case of severe starvation ketoacidosis developing during pregnancy is presented. The insulinopenic/insulin-resistant state found during fasting in late gestation predisposes to ketosis. Superimposition of stress hormones, which further augment lipolysis, exacerbates the degree of ketoacidosis. In our patient, gestational diabetes, twin pregnancies, preterm labor, and occult infection were factors that contributed to severe starvation ketoacidosis. Diagnosis was delayed because starvation ketosis is not generally considered to be a cause of severe acidosis, and because the anion gap was not elevated. Improved understanding of the complex fuel metabolism during pregnancy should aid in prevention, early recognition, and appropriate therapy of this condition. Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Fasting Ketosis In Pregnant And Nonpregnant Guinea Pigs

Comparison Of Fasting Ketosis In Pregnant And Nonpregnant Guinea Pigs

It was found that late-pregnant guinea pigs usually developed initially lower blood glucose and markedly higher blood acetone concentrations when fasted for 3 days than did nonpregnant controls. When parturition did not occur, nearly all the late-pregnant animals became ill during this fasting period and died 1–4 days after replacement of the feed. Some animals that underwent parturition after the onset of symptoms died. The symptoms exhibited, effects of fetal maturity and numbers, necropsy findings, fat content of the livers, blood urea nitrogen concentration, reduced output of CO2, ketonemia, early hypoglycemia and, later, euglycemia or hyperglycemia, suggest a marked similarity of this starvation syndrome to ‘pregnancy toxemia’ of ewes and guinea pigs. Metabolism of acetone-2-C14, Na acetate-2-C14, and Na palmitate-1-C14 was compared in normal and pregnant ketotic guinea pigs. Expired CO2, lipids, urine, liver tissue and acetone bodies were quantitated and assayed for radioactivity. After acetone-C14 injections, pregnant ketotic, as well as nonpregnant guinea pigs injected with carrier acetone, metabolized markedly less C14 as the blood concentration of acetone was progressively elevated. The data showed that the actual milligrams of free acetone utilized remained fairly constant regardless of the size of the body acetone pool. After acetate-C14 injections, pregnant fasted guinea pigs utilized less C14 for CO2 excretion and more C14 for biosynthesis than the nonpregnant fasted group. The difference in CO2 specific activity with regard to size of the body acetate pool is discussed. After palmitate-C14 injections, the mean specific activity of the CO2 was greater in the pregnant fasted than in the nonpregnant fasted animals. Since the liver fat content of the fo Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Starvation ketosis outside pregnancy is rare and infrequently causes a severe acidosis. Placental production of hormones, including glucagon and human placental lactogen, leads to the insulin resistance that is seen in pregnancy, which in turn increases susceptibility to ketosis particularly in the third trimester. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy has been reported and is usually precipitated by a period of severe vomiting. Ketoacidosis is likely to have important implications for fetal survival as ketoacidosis in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with intrauterine death. This article features four cases of women with vomiting in the third trimester of pregnancy associated with a severe metabolic acidosis. The mechanism underlying ketogenesis, the evidence for accelerated ketogenesis in pregnancy and other similar published cases are reviewed. A proposed strategy for management of these women is presented. Continue reading >>

Normoglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Normoglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

The clinical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy is usually the same as in nonpregnant women, although the blood glucose may not be as high as in the nongravid state. We report a case of a pregnant woman who developed diabetic ketoacidosis with a normal blood glucose and review the pertinent medical literature. A 29-year-old woman with type I diabetes developed diabetic ketoacidosis during induction of labor. She had a glucose level of 87 mg per 100 ml with ketonuria, a metabolic acidosis, and an anion gap of 20 mmol l−1. Normoglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis during pregnancy is truly unusual but can occur with relatively low, or even normal, blood sugars and necessitates prompt recognition and treatment. In this case, the combination of an initial episode of hypoglycemia and subsequent blood glucose levels below 95 mg per 100 ml led to a prolonged delay in the initiation of a planned insulin infusion for insulin coverage during the induction of labor. A significant ketoacidosis consequently developed, despite the absence of even a single elevated blood glucose measurement. This case illustrated the importance of not withholding insulin in a patient with type I diabetes for more than a few hours even if the blood glucose is normal. Normal pregnancy is characterized by a state of decreased insulin sensitivity, as well as accelerated lipolysis and ketogenesis.1, 2, 3, 4 The concentration of serum ketones has been estimated to be two to four times greater than in the nonpregnant state.1, 5 In addition, pregnant women have a respiratory alkalosis, lowering the serum bicarbonate concentration, thus reducing the capacity to buffer hydrogen ions. Despite these changes, the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in pregnant diabetic women is only 1 to 3%.6, 7 K Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract: Background: Pregnant women are predisposed to accelerated starvation due to continuous nutrient demands by the fetus, and they have increased susceptibility to ketogenesis during periods of caloric deprivation [1, 2]. We report a case of starvation ketoacidosis in a patient with gestational diabetes on a carbohydrate-restricted diet. Clinical case: A 30 year-old woman, gravida 5, para 2, with a history of spina bifida and hydrocephalus status post ventriculoperitoneal shunt, presented at 37 weeks of gestation with dyspnea. Her pregnancy had been complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus treated with a carbohydrate-restricted diet of 30 g a day. Due to a previous pregnancy complicated by late intrauterine fetal demise, a caesarean section was planned at 37 weeks of gestation after administration of steroids to induce fetal lung maturity. On admission, the patient’s blood pressure was 116/69 mm Hg, heart rate 106 beats per minute, oral temperature 36 °C, pulse ox 97%, and respiratory rate 20 breaths per minute. Laboratory tests showed a mixed metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis with pH 7.3 (7.33 - 7.43), HCO3 7.3 meq/l (20 - 27 meq/l), positive urinary ketones, and glucose of 75 mg/dl (65 – 139 mg/dl). Her glycosylated hemoglobin was 5.8% (4.0 - 6.0 %), C-peptide level 14.3 ng/ml (0.6 - 12.0 ng/ml), total insulin level 4.1 uU/ml (5 to 25 uU/ml), and lactate 1.8 mmol/l (0.5 - 2.2 mmol/l). Her dyspnea progressed, requiring intubation followed by emergent caesarean section. Afterwards, she was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit. She was treated with intravenous fluids containing dextrose and bicarbonate; she never received insulin and her blood glucose ranged from 65 to 139 mg/dl. By hospital day 3, the metabolic acidosis resolved, and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious metabolic complication of diabetes with high mortality if undetected. Its occurrence in pregnancy compromises both the fetus and the mother profoundly. Although predictably more common in patients with type 1 diabetes, it has been recognised in those with type 2 diabetes as well as gestational diabetes, especially with the use of corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity and β2-agonists for tocolysis.1–3 Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in the second and third trimesters because of increased insulin resistance, and is also seen in newly presenting type 1 diabetes patients. With increasing practice of antepartum diabetes screening and the availability of early and frequent prenatal care/surveillance, the incidence and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy have vastly improved. However, it still remains a major clinical problem in pregnancy since it tends to occur at lower blood glucose levels and more rapidly than in non-pregnant patients often causing delay in the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to illustrate a typical patient who may present with diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and review the literature on this relatively uncommon condition and provide an insight into the pathophysiology and management. MAGNITUDE OF THE PROBLEM In non-pregnant patients with type 1 diabetes, the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis is about 1–5 episodes per 100 per year with mortality averaging 5%–10%.4 The incidence rates of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and the corresponding fetal mortality rates from different retrospective studies5–8 are summarised in the table 1. As is evident from the table, both the incidence and rates of fetal loss in pregnancies have fallen in recent times compared with those before. In 1963 Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as "accelerated starvation." Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA). We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids. Discover the world's research 14+ million members 100+ million publications 700k+ research projects Join for free Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Nupur Sinha, Sindhaghatta Venkatram, and Gilda Diaz-Fuentes Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Correspondence should be addressed to Nupur Sinha; [email protected] Received  February ; Revised  May ; Accepted  May ; Published Continue reading >>

Extreme Gestational Starvation Ketoacidosis: Case Report And Review Of Pathophysiology

Extreme Gestational Starvation Ketoacidosis: Case Report And Review Of Pathophysiology

Hypocalcemia: Sensipar® lowers serum calcium and can lead to hypocalcemia. Life threatening events and fatal outcomes associated with hypocalcemia have been reported in patients treated with Sensipar®, including pediatric patients. The safety and effectiveness of Sensipar® have not been established in pediatric patients. Decreases in serum calcium can prolong the QT interval, potentially resulting in ventricular arrhythmia. Cases of QT prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia have been reported in patients treated with Sensipar®. Patients with conditions that predispose to QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia may be at increased risk for QT interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias if they develop hypocalcemia due to Sensipar®. Closely monitor corrected serum calcium and QT interval in patients at risk receiving Sensipar®. Concurrent administration of Sensipar® with calcium-lowering drugs including other calcimimetics could result in severe hypocalcemia. Parsabiv™ (etelcalcetide) and Sensipar® should not be given together. Closely monitor serum calcium in patients receiving Sensipar® and concomitant therapies known to lower serum calcium levels. Serum calcium and serum phosphorus should be measured within 1 week and PTH should be measured 1 to 4 weeks after initiation or dose adjustment of Sensipar®. Once the maintenance dose has been established, serum calcium and serum phosphorus should be measured approximately monthly, and PTH every 1 to 3 months. Patients with risk factors for upper GI bleeding, such as known gastritis, esophagitis, ulcers or severe vomiting, may be at increased risk for GI bleeding with Sensipar®. Monitor patients for worsening of common Sensipar® GI adverse reactions and for signs and symptoms of GI bleeding an Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Summarized from Frise C, Mackillop L, Joash K et al. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol 2012. Available online ahead of publication at: Arterial blood gas analysis in cases of metabolic acidosis reveals primary decrease in pH and bicarbonate, and secondary (compensatory) reduction in pCO2. The most common cause of metabolic acidosis is increased production of endogenous metabolic acids, either lactic acid, in which case the condition is called lactic acidosis, or keto-acids, in which case the condition is called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis most commonly occurs as an acute and life-threatening complication of type I diabetes, due to severe insulin deficiency and resulting reduced glucose availability for energy production within cells (insulin is required for glucose to enter cells). Keto-acids accumulate in blood as a result of metabolism of fats mobilized to fill the energy gap created by reduced availability of glucose within cells. Starvation is also associated with reduced availability of (dietary) glucose and potential for ketoacidosis, although compared with diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis is rare, usually mild and not life-threatening. Except, that is, when it occurs during pregnancy. In a recently published paper the authors outline four cases of severe starvation ketoacidosis, all occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy, following prolonged vomiting over a period of days. All four women presented for emergency admission in a very poorly state and still vomiting with severe partially compensated metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate in the range of 8-13 mmol/L and base deficit in the range of 14-22 mmol/L). All four required transfer to intensive care and premature delivery of their babies by emergency Cesarean section. Fort Continue reading >>

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Obesity is an increasingly common problem in pregnancy. It poses a number of challenges for physicians caring for pregnant women. One of the biggest issues is that of increased insulin resistance. This is evidenced by the increasing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and the number of women requiring oral hypoglycaemic agents or insulin during pregnancy. Pregnancy is also a time at which mental health may deteriorate, and psychiatric disorders are an important cause of maternal death in the UK.1 Newer classes of antipsychotics, in particular the ‘atypical’ or second-generation antipsychotics, are increasingly being used. Olanzapine, a commonly used atypical antipsychotic, is known to be associated with significant metabolic disturbances in the non-pregnant population, in particular weight gain and type 2 diabetes mellitus.2,3 Of concern is also the reported association of olanzapine use and unheralded diabetic ketoacidosis, which has been fatal in a number of cases.4 Ketoacidosis is most commonly seen in pregnancy in the setting of diabetes mellitus, but a number of cases of ketoacidosis with euglycaemia have also been reported following short periods of starvation.5,6 Starvation ketoacidosis is associated with a more severe acidosis than is seen in non-pregnant individuals. We describe a woman who was on olanzapine from 20 weeks of gestation, and then developed ketoacidosis after a short period of reduced oral intake. However, treatment was more challenging than in other reported cases and we attribute this to very profound insulin resistance as a consequence of concurrent olanzapine use. We speculate that olanzapine in combination with the insulin resistance attributable to pregnancy contributed to the presentation in this case. A 27-year-old female Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Copyright © 2014 Nupur Sinha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as “accelerated starvation.” Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA). We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids. 1. Introduction A relative insulin deficient state has been well described in pregnancy. This is due to placentally derived hormones including glucagon, cortisol, and human placental lactogen which are increased in periods of stress [1]. The insulin resistance increases with gestational age Continue reading >>

Acute Starvation In Pregnancy: A Cause Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Acute Starvation In Pregnancy: A Cause Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Abstract We report a case of starvation-induced metabolic ketoacidosis in a previously healthy 29-year-old, nulliparous woman at 32 weeks of gestation. She was admitted to hospital with mild preeclampsia associated with persistent nausea and vomiting that progressed to severe preeclampsia requiring urgent control of hypertension before caesarean delivery. Prolonged and severe vomiting limited oral caloric intake and led to starvation ketoacidosis, characterised by ketonuria and a raised anion gap metabolic acidosis that required intensive care support. Despite significant metabolic derangement the patient appeared clinically well. Intravascular volume was replenished. Fluid restriction used as part of our preeclampsia treatment regimen delayed the therapeutic administration of sufficient dextrose, which rapidly corrected her metabolic derangement when commenced after delivery. Electrolyte supplementation was given to prevent re-feeding syndrome. Both mother and baby were discharged without sequelae. Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Starvation ketosis outside pregnancy is rare and infrequently causes a severe acidosis. Placental production of hormones, including glucagon and human placental lactogen, leads to the insulin resistance that is seen in pregnancy, which in turn increases susceptibility to ketosis particularly in the third trimester. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy has been reported and is usually precipitated by a period of severe vomiting. Ketoacidosis is likely to have important implications for fetal survival as ketoacidosis in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with intrauterine death. This article features four cases of women with vomiting in the third trimester of pregnancy associated with a severe metabolic acidosis. The mechanism underlying ketogenesis, the evidence for accelerated ketogenesis in pregnancy and other similar published cases are reviewed. A proposed strategy for management of these women is presented. Continue reading >>

More in ketosis

  • Metformin Contraindications Alcohol

    Home Q & A Questions Can you drink alcohol while... Can you drink alcohol while on metformin? If you're diabetic then y...

    ketosis Apr 13, 2020
  • Is Lactic Acidosis?

    The integrity and function of all cells depend on an adequate supply of oxygen. Severe acute illness is frequently asso...

    ketosis Apr 10, 2020
  • Acidosis And Alkalosis

    Ketoacid production in acute respiratory and metabolic acidosis and alkalosis in rats. Department of Medicine, Universi...

    ketosis Jan 21, 2020
  • Adaptive Glucose Sparing

    The myths about low carb dieting and specifically ketogenic diets abound in the American collective consciousness. These...

    ketosis Dec 27, 2023
  • Dka Abdominal Pain Location

    Diabetic ketoacidosis definition and facts Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes (...

    ketosis Mar 29, 2020
  • Glycerol To Glucose

    Cell biologists have found a more filling substitute for caloric restriction in extending the life span of simple organ...

    ketosis Apr 5, 2020
  • What Is Ketosis

    The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for som...

    ketosis Mar 28, 2018
  • Can You Put On Weight In Ketosis?

    It’s pretty obvious the well-known advice to “eat less, move more” for losing weight is not working for most peopl...

    ketosis Mar 31, 2020
  • Ketoacidosis Symptoms

    My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, st...

    ketosis Mar 19, 2020