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Starvation Ketosis And Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Introduction: Starvation ketosis outside pregnancy is a rare phenomenon and is unlikely to cause a severe acidosis. Pregnancy is an insulin resistant state due to placental production of hormones including glucagon and human placental lactogen. Insulin resistance increases with advancing gestation and this confers a susceptibility to ketosis, particularly in the third trimester. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy has been reported and is usually precipitated by a period of severe vomiting. Ketoacidosis has been associated with intrauterine death. Case report: A 22-year-old woman in her third pregnancy presented at 32 weeks gestation with a 24 h history of severe vomiting. She had been treated for an asthma exacerbation with prednisolone and erythromycin the day prior to presentation. She was unwell, hypertensive (145/70 mmHg) with a sinus tachycardia and Kussmaul breathing. Urinalysis showed ++++ ketones, + protein and pH 5. Fingerprick glucose was 4 mmol/l and ketones were 4.0 mmol/l. Arterial blood gas showed pH 7.27, PaCO2 1.1 kPa, base excess −23, bicarbonate 8.6 mmol/l and lactate 0.6 mmol/l. The anion gap was 20. Serum ethanol, salicylates and paracetamol levels were undetectable. She was fluid resuscitated but her biochemical parameters did not improve. She was intubated and underwent emergency caesarean section. A healthy boy was delivered and her acidosis resolved over the subsequent 8 h. Discussion: We believe this case is explained by starvation ketoacidosis. There was no evidence of diabetes mellitus or other causes of a metabolic acidosis. In view of the hypertension, proteinuria and raised urate the differential diagnosis was an atypical presentation of pre-eclampsia. This case illustrates the metabolic stress imposed by the feto-placental unit. It als Continue reading >>

Warning! Starvation Ketosis Is Serious

Warning! Starvation Ketosis Is Serious

Beware of Starvation Ketosis Starvation ketosis is a serious condition that happens when your pregnant body is starved for nutrition, especially carbohydrates. With starvation ketosis, your tissues begin to breakdown and the byproducts of this ketabolism are called ketones, which actually aggravate nausea. To prevent starvation ketosis, try the following: Salty fluids, such as broths in chicken soup Oral electrolyte solutions (Pedialyte, available over the counter) Sports drinks Continue reading >>

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Summarized from Frise C, Mackillop L, Joash K et al. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol 2012. Available online ahead of publication at: Arterial blood gas analysis in cases of metabolic acidosis reveals primary decrease in pH and bicarbonate, and secondary (compensatory) reduction in pCO2. The most common cause of metabolic acidosis is increased production of endogenous metabolic acids, either lactic acid, in which case the condition is called lactic acidosis, or keto-acids, in which case the condition is called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis most commonly occurs as an acute and life-threatening complication of type I diabetes, due to severe insulin deficiency and resulting reduced glucose availability for energy production within cells (insulin is required for glucose to enter cells). Keto-acids accumulate in blood as a result of metabolism of fats mobilized to fill the energy gap created by reduced availability of glucose within cells. Starvation is also associated with reduced availability of (dietary) glucose and potential for ketoacidosis, although compared with diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis is rare, usually mild and not life-threatening. Except, that is, when it occurs during pregnancy. In a recently published paper the authors outline four cases of severe starvation ketoacidosis, all occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy, following prolonged vomiting over a period of days. All four women presented for emergency admission in a very poorly state and still vomiting with severe partially compensated metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate in the range of 8-13 mmol/L and base deficit in the range of 14-22 mmol/L). All four required transfer to intensive care and premature delivery of their babies by emergency Cesarean section. Fort Continue reading >>

Is Low Carb And Keto Safe During Pregnancy?

Is Low Carb And Keto Safe During Pregnancy?

When Carolina Cartier discovered she was pregnant with twins this past March, she never questioned whether she would continue eating a ketogenic diet. The 31-year-old Seattle area woman had been plagued by metabolic issues literally all her life: precocious puberty at age 3; polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) by age 14; weight gain of 320 lbs (145 kg) on her 6 foot (183 cm) frame and pre-diabetes by her 20s. Her PCOS caused her ovaries to be enlarged and covered in cysts. She was told she was infertile and likely never able to have children. In August 2014, aged 28, her health was so poor that she went on medical disability from her job as a financial analyst. That first month off, however, she discovered and adopted the ketogenic diet. Between summer 2014 and February 2017, she lost 120 lbs (54 kg), experienced her first ever natural menstrual period that gradually established into a regular 28-day cycle; her blood sugar normalized and her ovaries reduced to 3.5 cm (< 1.5 inches) size. Her long-standing depression lifted. While she lost two early pregnancies at the start of 2016, likely because of poor egg quality, she knew she was getting healthier every day. Her positive pregnancy test in March 2017 was a happy surprise, as was the news soon after that she was carrying healthy twins. Except for a bout of extreme nausea and sea sickness for a week on a low-carb cruise early in this pregnancy, she has adhered to the ketogenic diet now through to 20 weeks of pregnancy and counting. She plans to continue this way of eating for the rest of her life. She feels great and looks wonderful; the twins in utero are thriving. “My life is transformed. Why would I even consider abandoning this way of eating when all of my positive health changes, and my pregnancy, I owe to this d Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as "accelerated starvation." Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA). We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids. Discover the world's research 14+ million members 100+ million publications 700k+ research projects Join for free Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Nupur Sinha, Sindhaghatta Venkatram, and Gilda Diaz-Fuentes Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Correspondence should be addressed to Nupur Sinha; [email protected] Received  February ; Revised  May ; Accepted  May ; Published Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

King's Authors Abstract Starvation ketosis outside pregnancy is rare and infrequently causes a severe acidosis. Placental production of hormones, including glucagon and human placental lactogen, leads to the insulin resistance that is seen in pregnancy, which in turn increases susceptibility to ketosis particularly in the third trimester. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy has been reported and is usually precipitated by a period of severe vomiting. Ketoacidosis is likely to have important implications for fetal survival as ketoacidosis in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with intrauterine death. This article features four cases of women with vomiting in the third trimester of pregnancy associated with a severe metabolic acidosis. The mechanism underlying ketogenesis, the evidence for accelerated ketogenesis in pregnancy and other similar published cases are reviewed. A proposed strategy for management of these women is presented. Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Of 'fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis'

Of 'fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis'

TI A case of severe starvation ketoacidosis developing during pregnancy is presented. The insulinopenic/insulin-resistant state found during fasting in late gestation predisposes to ketosis. Superimposition of stress hormones, which further augment lipolysis, exacerbates the degree of ketoacidosis. In our patient, gestational diabetes, twin pregnancies, preterm labor, and occult infection were factors that contributed to severe starvation ketoacidosis. Diagnosis was delayed because starvation ketosis is not generally considered to be a cause of severe acidosis, and because the anion gap was not elevated. Improved understanding of the complex fuel metabolism during pregnancy should aid in prevention, early recognition, and appropriate therapy of this condition. Continue reading >>

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract: Background: Pregnant women are predisposed to accelerated starvation due to continuous nutrient demands by the fetus, and they have increased susceptibility to ketogenesis during periods of caloric deprivation [1, 2]. We report a case of starvation ketoacidosis in a patient with gestational diabetes on a carbohydrate-restricted diet. Clinical case: A 30 year-old woman, gravida 5, para 2, with a history of spina bifida and hydrocephalus status post ventriculoperitoneal shunt, presented at 37 weeks of gestation with dyspnea. Her pregnancy had been complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus treated with a carbohydrate-restricted diet of 30 g a day. Due to a previous pregnancy complicated by late intrauterine fetal demise, a caesarean section was planned at 37 weeks of gestation after administration of steroids to induce fetal lung maturity. On admission, the patient’s blood pressure was 116/69 mm Hg, heart rate 106 beats per minute, oral temperature 36 °C, pulse ox 97%, and respiratory rate 20 breaths per minute. Laboratory tests showed a mixed metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis with pH 7.3 (7.33 - 7.43), HCO3 7.3 meq/l (20 - 27 meq/l), positive urinary ketones, and glucose of 75 mg/dl (65 – 139 mg/dl). Her glycosylated hemoglobin was 5.8% (4.0 - 6.0 %), C-peptide level 14.3 ng/ml (0.6 - 12.0 ng/ml), total insulin level 4.1 uU/ml (5 to 25 uU/ml), and lactate 1.8 mmol/l (0.5 - 2.2 mmol/l). Her dyspnea progressed, requiring intubation followed by emergent caesarean section. Afterwards, she was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit. She was treated with intravenous fluids containing dextrose and bicarbonate; she never received insulin and her blood glucose ranged from 65 to 139 mg/dl. By hospital day 3, the metabolic acidosis resolved, and Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Ketoacidosis (kabadi Syndrome): Ketoacidosis Induced By High Circulating Lipase In Acute Pancreatitis

Pancreatic Ketoacidosis (kabadi Syndrome): Ketoacidosis Induced By High Circulating Lipase In Acute Pancreatitis

Broadlawns Medical Center, Des Moines University, Des Moines, Iowa and University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. *Corresponding Author: 17185, Berkshire Parkway Clive, Iowa, 50325, USA Phone +5152823041 E-mail [email protected] Visit for more related articles at JOP. Journal of the Pancreas Abstract Introduction Ketoacidosis is well established as a metabolic complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes Mellitus (Diabetic Ketoacidosis). It is often an initial presentation of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents and occasionally in adults. Alternatively, it is induced of an onset of an acute disorder, e. g, sepsis, myocardial infarction, stroke, pregnancy etc. in subjects with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Ketoacidosis is also known to occur following an ethanol binge (Alcoholic Ketoacidosis). Finally, ketonemia with a rare progression to Ketoacidosis is documented to ensue following prolonged starvation. Methods The review of English literature for over 35 years from 01/1980 till 12/2015 for terms, 'ketonemia, ketonuria and ketoacidosis' 'pancreatic lipase' and 'acute pancreatitis'. Results 1) Description of individual patients presented as case reports, 2) Documentation of a series of consecutive subjects hospitalized for management of acute pancreatitis with special attention to establishing the prevalence of the disorder as well as examining the relationship between the severity of the disorder and occurrence of Ketoacidosis, 3) Studies demonstrating the relationship between progressively rising circulating pancreatic lipase concentrations with ketonuria, ketonemia and Ketoacidosis in subjects presenting with acute pancreatitis irrespective of the etiology and documenting resolution of ketonuria, ketonemia and ketoacidosis following the declining serum lipase leve Continue reading >>

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Today my friend and colleague, Lily Nichols, a fellow registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, shares her insight on carbohydrate-restricted diets during pregnancy. This is a controversial topic that I believe deserves more attention and investigation, which Lily does brilliantly in the following article. Is It Safe to Go Low Carb During Pregnancy? With the wide adoption of low-carbohydrate diets, many people question if they are safe during pregnancy. While quite a few women use a lower carbohydrate diet to conceive (since they are especially useful for women struggling with infertility[1]), most medical professionals discourage women from continuing this diet during pregnancy. I find it ironic that if you tell your doctor that you plan to eat low carb during pregnancy, they’ll say it’s unsafe, but if you say you plan to eat a diet based on fresh vegetables, meat, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, seeds, and a little fruit, they’ll encourage you to stay the course. The controversy over the safety of low carbohydrate diets in pregnancy stems primarily from misconceptions around ketosis. It’s incorrect, but widely accepted, that ketosis during pregnancy is harmful to a developing baby. When I first dove into the research, I was shocked to find that studies on healthy, non-diabetic pregnant women (eating a “regular” diet) show a marked elevation in ketones after a 12-18 hour fast, which is akin to eating dinner at 8pm and having breakfast at 8am (or skipping breakfast entirely).[2] What’s more interesting is that pregnancy actually seems to favor a state of ketosis. Compared to non-pregnant women, blood ketone concentrations are about 3-fold higher in healthy pregnant women after an overnight fast.[3] And in late pregnancy, metabolism shifts to a state o Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy.

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy.

Abstract Starvation ketosis outside pregnancy is rare and infrequently causes a severe acidosis. Placental production of hormones, including glucagon and human placental lactogen, leads to the insulin resistance that is seen in pregnancy, which in turn increases susceptibility to ketosis particularly in the third trimester. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy has been reported and is usually precipitated by a period of severe vomiting. Ketoacidosis is likely to have important implications for fetal survival as ketoacidosis in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with intrauterine death. This article features four cases of women with vomiting in the third trimester of pregnancy associated with a severe metabolic acidosis. The mechanism underlying ketogenesis, the evidence for accelerated ketogenesis in pregnancy and other similar published cases are reviewed. A proposed strategy for management of these women is presented. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

If you’re a pregnant woman, probably one of the last things you want to hear is that you have gestational diabetes. Your thoughts might range from, “What did I do to cause this?” to “Will my baby be OK?” First, keep in mind that it’s perfectly normal to feel scared and worried. Second, while gestational diabetes (GDM) is indeed serious, remember that, with proper management, you can have a healthy baby. Once you’re diagnosed If you find out that you have GDM, be prepared to learn a lot about diabetes! You’ll likely be referred to a diabetes educator and/or a dietitian. You might also be referred to an endocrinologist, a doctor who specializes in diabetes and other endocrine disorders. In most cases, you’ll be seen by a member of your health-care team about every two weeks. Be prepared to start checking your blood glucose with a meter, following a meal plan, checking your urine for ketones, recording your food and glucose levels, and possibly starting on insulin. In other words, be prepared to do some homework! Your team is there to support you and make sure that you receive the right treatment. Treating GDM There are a number of ways in which GDM is treated, and they all work together to help ensure that your blood glucose levels stay in a safe range throughout your pregnancy. Remember that the goal is to keep your blood glucose in a normal range; this is because, when blood glucose levels are too high, the extra glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. Too much glucose can cause your baby to be too large, and may cause other complications for both you and your baby during delivery and later on (such as Type 2 diabetes). Nutrition and meal planning. The saying that “you’re eating for two” during your pregnancy is partly correct. You ARE eating f Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Copyright © 2014 Nupur Sinha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as “accelerated starvation.” Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA). We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids. 1. Introduction A relative insulin deficient state has been well described in pregnancy. This is due to placentally derived hormones including glucagon, cortisol, and human placental lactogen which are increased in periods of stress [1]. The insulin resistance increases with gestational age Continue reading >>

Case Of Nondiabetic Ketoacidosis In Third Term Twin Pregnancy | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

Case Of Nondiabetic Ketoacidosis In Third Term Twin Pregnancy | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

We provided appropriate management with fluid infusion after cesarean delivery. The patient and her two daughters survived, and no disabilities were foreseen. Alcohol, methanol, and lactic acid levels were normal. No signs of renal disease or diabetes were present. Pathological examination revealed no abnormalities of the placentae. Toxicological tests revealed a salicylate level of less than 5 mg/liter, an acetaminophen level of less than 1 mg/liter, and an acetone level of 300 mg/liter (reference, 520 mg/liter). We present a case of third term twin pregnancy with high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to (mild) starvation. Starvation, obesity, third term twin pregnancy, and perhaps a gastroenteritis were the ultimate provoking factors. In the light of the erroneous suspicion of sepsis and initial fluid therapy lacking glucose, one wonders whether, under a different fluid regime, cesarean section could have been avoided. Severe ketoacidosis in the pregnant woman is associated with impaired neurodevelopment. It therefore demands early recognition and immediate intervention. A 26-yr-old patient was admitted to our hospital complaining of rapid progressive dyspnea and abdominal discomfort. She was pregnant with dichorial, diamniotic twins for 35 wk and 4 d. Medical history showed that she was heterozygous for hemochromatosis. Two years before, she had given birth to a healthy girl of 3925 g by cesarean section, and 1 yr before, she had had a spontaneous abortion. Her preadmission outpatient surveillance revealed slightly elevated blood pressure varying from 132158 mm Hg systolic and 7995 mm Hg diastolic. Glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were tested at 24 wk and were normal at 4.6 mmol/liter and 5.4% (36 mmol/mol), respectively. Urine analysis at the outpatient obstetri Continue reading >>

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