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Starvation Ketoacidosis Signs And Symptoms

Ketosis

Ketosis

Ketosis, metabolic disorder marked by high levels of ketones in the tissues and body fluids, including blood and urine. With starvation or fasting, there is less sugar than normal in the blood and less glycogen (the storage form of sugar) in the cells of the body, especially the liver cells; fat accumulates in the liver, as do amino acids, from which the liver can produce more glycogen. Ketosis may be present in diabetes mellitus. In diabetic ketoacidosis, characterized by excessive levels of ketones in the blood that lead to a decrease in blood pH, very high blood sugar and severe intravascular and cellular dehydration create a life-threatening disorder that requires immediate treatment. When cattle are affected by ketosis, they lose weight and produce less milk; dietary adjustment to meet the special requirements of individual cattle helps avoid the condition. Continue reading >>

Extreme Gestational Starvation Ketoacidosis: Case Report And Review Of Pathophysiology

Extreme Gestational Starvation Ketoacidosis: Case Report And Review Of Pathophysiology

A case of severe starvation ketoacidosis developing during pregnancy is presented. The insulinopenic/insulinresistant state found during fasting in late gestation predisposes to ketosis. Superimposition of stress hormones, which further augment lipolysis, exacerbates the degree of ketoacidosis. In our patient, gestational diabetes, twin pregnancies, preterm labor, and occult infection were factors that contributed to severe starvation ketoacidosis. Diagnosis was delayed because starvation ketosis is not generally considered to be a cause of severe acidosis, and because the anion gap was not elevated. Improved understanding of the complex fuel metabolism during pregnancy should aid in prevention, early recognition, and appropriate therapy of this condition. Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In Diabetic Pregnancy

Ketoacidosis In Diabetic Pregnancy

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious medical and obstetrical emergency previously considered typical of type 1 diabetes but now reported also in type 2 and GDM patients. Although it is a fairly rare condition, DKA in pregnancy can compromise both fetus and mother. Metabolic changes occurring during pregnancy predispose to DKA in fact it can develop even in setting of normoglycemia. This article will provide the reader with information regarding the pathophysiology underlying DKA, in particular euglycemic DKA, and will provide information regarding all possible effects of ketones on the fetus. Continue reading >>

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

Chapter 220. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Chapter 220. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. The incidence and prevalence of diabetes are rising; as of 2005, an estimated 7% of the U.S. population had diabetes. In patients age 60 or older, the prevalence is estimated to be 20.9%.1 DKA occurs predominately in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, but unprovoked DKA can occur in newly diagnosed type 2 (non–insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, especially in blacks and Hispanics.2 Between 1993 and 2003, the yearly rate of ED visits for DKA per 10,000 U.S. population with diabetes was 64, with a trend toward an increased rate of visits among the black population compared with the white population.3 Europe has a comparable incidence. A better understanding of pathophysiology and an aggressive, uniform approach to diagnosis and management have reduced mortality to <5% of reported episodes in experienced centers.4 However, mortality is higher in the elderly due to underlying renal disease or coexisting infection and in the presence of coma or hypotension. DKA is a response to cellular starvation brought on by relative insulin deficiency and counterregulatory or catabolic hormone excess (Figure 220-1). Insulin is the only anabolic hormone produced by the endocrine pancreas and is responsible for the metabolism and storage of carbohydrates, fat, and protein. Counterregulatory hormones include glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone. Complete or relative absence of insulin and the excess counterregulatory hormones result in hyperglycemia (due to excess production and underutilization of glucose), osmotic diuresis, prerenal azotemia, worsening hyperglycemia, ketone formation, and a wide-anion gap metabolic acidosis.4 Insulin deficiency. Patho Continue reading >>

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Easily Missed Diagnosis

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Easily Missed Diagnosis

SESSION TITLE: Critical Care Student/Resident Case Report Posters I SESSION TYPE: Student/Resident Case Report Poster INTRODUCTION: A 47 year-old woman with type 1 diabetes presented with euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) that initially went undiagnosed. Recognition and treatment with insulin resulted in rapid resolution of her clinical condition. CASE PRESENTATION: A 47 year-old woman presented to our hospital with four days of fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, lethargy and malaise. She had a history of type 1 diabetes mellitus managed with an insulin pump. Her blood pressure was 88/51. She was disoriented with a diffusely tender but soft abdomen. Laboratory studies revealed blood glucose of 109 mg/dL, bicarbonate of 15 mmol/L, anion gap of 27 mmol/L, lactic acid of 2.4 mmol/L, and a bandemia of 11%. Rapid flu test was positive. She was admitted to the intensive care unit, resuscitated with intravenous fluid, and started on oseltamivir, cefepime and vancomycin. Hemodialysis was initiated soon thereafter. The patient received no insulin due to her euglycemia. Influenza A was detected by PCR on the second hospital day and antibiotics were discontinued. Her gastrointestinal symptoms improved but her mental status remained poor. Furthermore, while her lactate normalized and blood glucose remained under 120 mg/d, her anion gap persisted at 23-36 mmol/L and her bicarbonate remained low at 15-17 mmol/L. Beta hydroxybutyrate was found to be 4.88 mmol/L. An insulin infusion was started, along with dextrose 5% in water, and her mental status rapidly improved as her acidemia and anion gap normalized. DISCUSSION: Euglycemic DKA is a rare condition that can easily go undiagnosed. It has been previously described in the context of critical illness.1 The pathoge Continue reading >>

Starvation Acidosis

Starvation Acidosis

acidosis [as″ĭ-do´sis] 1. the accumulation of acid and hydrogen ions or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate content) in the blood and body tissues, resulting in a decrease in pH. 2. a pathologic condition resulting from this process, characterized by increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in pH). The optimal acid-base balance is maintained by chemical buffers, biologic activities of the cells, and effective functioning of the lungs and kidneys. The opposite of acidosis is alkalosis. adj., adj acidot´ic. Acidosis usually occurs secondary to some underlying disease process; the two major types, distinguished according to cause, are metabolic acidosis and respiratory acidosis (see accompanying table). In mild cases the symptoms may be overlooked; in severe cases symptoms are more obvious and may include muscle twitching, involuntary movement, cardiac arrhythmias, disorientation, and coma. In general, treatment consists of intravenous or oral administration of sodium bicarbonate or sodium lactate solutions and correction of the underlying cause of the imbalance. Many cases of severe acidosis can be prevented by careful monitoring of patients whose primary illness predisposes them to respiratory problems or metabolic derangements that can cause increased levels of acidity or decreased bicarbonate levels. Such care includes effective teaching of self-care to the diabetic so that the disease remains under control. Patients receiving intravenous therapy, especially those having a fluid deficit, and those with biliary or intestinal intubation should be watched closely for early signs of acidosis. Others predisposed to acidosis are patients with shock, hyperthyroidism, advanced circulatory failure, renal failure, respiratory disorders, or liver disease. Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a severe metabolic complication due to long-term alcohol consumption. The disease is the accumulation of ketones in the blood. Ketones are the by-product of the body when it breaks down fat for energy. A person who drinks alcohol every day can often be malnourished. One of the main reasons for getting the disease is the clear effects of alcoholism and starvation. In this condition, starvation means the glucose starvation of metabolism. Ketoacidosis from alcoholism should be a tigger that you need to seek alcohol addiction treatment. What causes Alcoholic Ketoacidosis? Long-term very heavy alcohol consumption will cause the disease. Prolonged alcohol abuse may cause malnutrition; the combination of these two may lead to Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. How does the body metabolize? For the body to function properly, the cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin. The body can produce glucose when it digests the food, and the pancreas produces insulin. However, when a person drinks alcohol, the pancreas may stop producing insulin for a brief period. Without insulin, the cell cannot produce glucose for the energy that the body needs. To replenish itself with the energy it will start to burn fat. Once the body turns fat for energy, it will produce ketones. Once the body stops producing insulin for long period due to alcohol intake, ketones will start to accumulate in the bloodstream. This buildup will eventually lead to a severe condition called ketoacidosis. Here are the important events when a person drinks heavy for a long period of time: Also, people who drink too much alcohol may not eat properly and regularly. Most often they vomit frequently because of the alcohol intake. Not eating properly and vomiting may result in starvation. Whenever this happens, t Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Kamel S. Kamel MD, FRCPC, Mitchell L. Halperin MD, FRCPC, in Fluid, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Physiology (Fifth Edition), 2017 Introduction Although ketoacidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis because of the addition of acids, it is discussed separately in this chapter to emphasize the metabolic and biochemical issues required to understand the clinical aspects of this disorder (see margin note). We discuss the metabolic setting that is required to allow for the formation of ketoacids in the liver at a high rate and what sets the limit on the rate of production. Removal of ketoacids occurs mainly in the brain and kidneys. We examine what sets the limit on the rate of removal of ketoacids by these organs. We believe that understanding the biochemical and metabolic aspects of ketoacidsis provides the clinician with a better understanding of this disorder and allows for a better design of therapy in the individual patient with ketoacidosis. Relevant to the pathophysiology of this case, the soft drinks the patient consumed contained a large quantity of glucose, fructose, and caffeine. Ketoacids • A ketone is an organic compound that has a keto group (C=O) on an internal carbon atom. • Acetone is a ketone but not an acid. • Only acetoacetic acid is a ketoacid. β-Hydroxybutyric acid has a hydroxyl group (C–OH) on its internal carbon, so it is a hydroxy acid and not a ketoacid. Abbreviations β-HB, beta hydroxybutyrate anion AcAc, acetoacetate anion ADP, adenosine diphosphate ATP, adenosine triphosphate NAD+, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide NADH,H+, reduced form of NAD+ FAD, flavin adenine dinucleotide FADH2, hydroxyquinone form of FAD EABV, effective arterial blood volume PAnion gap, plasma anion gap PGlucose, concentration of glucose in plasma POsmolal gap, plasm Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Damian Baalmann, 2nd year EM resident A 45-year-old male presents to your emergency department with abdominal pain. He is conscious, lucid and as the nurses are hooking up the monitors, he explains to you that he began experiencing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting about 2 days ago. Exam reveals a poorly groomed male with dry mucous membranes, diffusely tender abdomen with voluntary guarding. He is tachycardic, tachypneic but normotensive. A quick review of the chart reveals a prolonged history of alcohol abuse and after some questioning, the patient admits to a recent binge. Pertinent labs reveal slightly elevated anion-gap metabolic acidosis, normal glucose, ethanol level of 0, normal lipase and no ketones in the urine. What are your next steps in management? Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA): What is it? Ketones are a form of energy made by the liver by free fatty acids released by adipose tissues. Normally, ketones are in small quantity (<0.1 mmol/L), but sometimes the body is forced to increase its production of these ketones. Ketones are strong acids and when they accumulate in large numbers, their presence leads to an acidosis. In alcoholics, a combination or reduced nutrient intake, hepatic oxidation of ethanol, and dehydration can lead to ketoacidosis. Alcoholics tend to rely on ethanol for their nutrient intake and when the liver metabolizes ethanol it generates NADH. This NADH further promotes ketone formation in the liver. Furthermore, ethanol promotes diuresis which leads to dehydration and subsequently impairs ketone excretion in the urine. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: How do I recognize it? Typical history involves a chronic alcohol abuser who went on a recent binge that was terminated by severe nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. These folk Continue reading >>

What Are Ketone Bodies And How Are They Related To Diabetes?

What Are Ketone Bodies And How Are They Related To Diabetes?

What are ketones? The human body normally runs on glucose that’s produced when the body breaks down carbohydrates. But when your body doesn’t have enough glucose or insulin to use the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones are byproducts of this breakdown. Those with type 1 diabetes are especially at risk for making ketones. Ketones can make your blood acidic. Acidic blood can cause a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Because the presence of ketones is often one of the signs that a person needs medical help, those with diabetes are often encouraged to check ketones in urine or blood regularly. Ketone levels can range from negative or none at all to very high levels. While individual testing may vary, some general results for ketone levels can be: negative: less than 0.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) low to moderate: between 0.6 to 1.5 mmol/L high: 1.6 to 3.0 mmol/L very high: greater than 3.0 mmol/L Call your doctor if your ketones are low to moderate, and seek emergency medical attention if your ketone levels are high to very high. What are the symptoms of ketone buildup? If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. Examples of early symptoms of ketone buildup include: a dry mouth blood sugar levels greater than 240 milligrams per deciliter strong thirst frequent urination If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress. The symptoms that occur later can include: confusion extreme fatigue flushed skin a fruity breath odor nausea vomiting stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. What causes ketones to build up? Ketones are the body’s alternate way of fueling. T Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Ketoacidosis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that can occur as a complication of diabetes. People with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have high blood sugar levels and a build-up of chemicals called ketones in the body that makes the blood more acidic than usual. Diabetic ketoacidosis can develop when there isn’t enough insulin in the body for it to use sugars for energy, so it starts to use fat as a fuel instead. When fat is broken down to make energy, ketones are made in the body as a by-product. Ketones are harmful to the body, and diabetic ketoacidosis can be life-threatening. Fortunately, treatment is available and is usually successful. Symptoms Ketoacidosis usually develops gradually over hours or days. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis may include: excessive thirst; increased urination; tiredness or weakness; a flushed appearance, with hot dry skin; nausea and vomiting; dehydration; restlessness, discomfort and agitation; fruity or acetone smelling breath (like nail polish remover); abdominal pain; deep or rapid breathing; low blood pressure (hypotension) due to dehydration; and confusion and coma. See your doctor as soon as possible or seek emergency treatment if you develop symptoms of ketoacidosis. Who is at risk of diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 diabetes. It rarely affects people with type 2 diabetes. DKA may be the first indication that a person has type 1 diabetes. It can also affect people with known diabetes who are not getting enough insulin to meet their needs, either due to insufficient insulin or increased needs. Ketoacidosis most often happens when people with diabetes: do not get enough insulin due to missed or incorrect doses of insulin or problems with their insulin pump; have an infection or illne Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Ketoacidosis (kabadi Syndrome): Ketoacidosis Induced By High Circulating Lipase In Acute Pancreatitis

Pancreatic Ketoacidosis (kabadi Syndrome): Ketoacidosis Induced By High Circulating Lipase In Acute Pancreatitis

Broadlawns Medical Center, Des Moines University, Des Moines, Iowa and University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. *Corresponding Author: 17185, Berkshire Parkway Clive, Iowa, 50325, USA Phone +5152823041 E-mail [email protected] Visit for more related articles at JOP. Journal of the Pancreas Abstract Introduction Ketoacidosis is well established as a metabolic complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes Mellitus (Diabetic Ketoacidosis). It is often an initial presentation of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents and occasionally in adults. Alternatively, it is induced of an onset of an acute disorder, e. g, sepsis, myocardial infarction, stroke, pregnancy etc. in subjects with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Ketoacidosis is also known to occur following an ethanol binge (Alcoholic Ketoacidosis). Finally, ketonemia with a rare progression to Ketoacidosis is documented to ensue following prolonged starvation. Methods The review of English literature for over 35 years from 01/1980 till 12/2015 for terms, 'ketonemia, ketonuria and ketoacidosis' 'pancreatic lipase' and 'acute pancreatitis'. Results 1) Description of individual patients presented as case reports, 2) Documentation of a series of consecutive subjects hospitalized for management of acute pancreatitis with special attention to establishing the prevalence of the disorder as well as examining the relationship between the severity of the disorder and occurrence of Ketoacidosis, 3) Studies demonstrating the relationship between progressively rising circulating pancreatic lipase concentrations with ketonuria, ketonemia and Ketoacidosis in subjects presenting with acute pancreatitis irrespective of the etiology and documenting resolution of ketonuria, ketonemia and ketoacidosis following the declining serum lipase leve Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

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