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Sore Tongue Ketosis

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb diets may be good for your waistline, but you might not be able to say the same for your breath. Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic! Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet. "Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. Pass the Bread? This is not an oral hygiene problem, Burrell says, so "all the brushing, flossing, and scraping of the tongue that you can do is not possibly enough to overcome this." The bottom line is that you must "reconsider the diet and modify it so this doesn't happen," he says. Sure, "there may be some ways to mask it by using mouthwashes, but you can't overcome the fundamental problem other than by changing the diet -- or at least introducing some carbohydrates." "It's a difficult problem to solve because if one uses any sucking candy or lozenge, one has to be careful that it has no sugar in it" as sugar is a big no-no on many low-carb eating plans, says S. Lawrence Simon, DDS, a New York City periodon Continue reading >>

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Via Spanish Caravan, a frequent commenter with let’s just say a “medical background.” ~~~ Physiological Insulin Resistatnce (PIR) results from glucose deficiency the same way mucin deficiency induces dry eyes, nostrils, colon and anemia like symptoms. They’re both ways of preserving glucose for your brain. When you VLC, your muscles become insulin resistant to preserve your glucose for the brain. So while your muscles are running on fatty acids, they become insulin resistant. This leaves glucose for your brain but the net result is your BG going up as you’re “physiologically” insulin resistant. There doesn’t really seem to a problem with this state, as there is with mucin deficiency; it’s not known to induce diabetes or make prediabetics diabetic. At least not according to those who advocate VLCing. I have a feeling however, that this is a disease-prone state. The effects of low carbohydrate diets on insulin sensitivity depend on what is used to replace the dietary carbohydrate, and the nature of the subjects studied. Dietary carbohydrates may affect insulin action, at least in part, via alterations in plasma free fatty acids. In normal subjects a high-carbohydrate/low-GI breakfast meal reduced free fatty acids by reducing the undershoot of plasma glucose, whereas low-carbohydrate breakfasts increased postprandial free fatty acids. Why is it disease-prone? Because high serum free fatty acids are implicated in various disease states, especially immune related (and also diabetes in some cases). High serum FFA and very low trigs that we see among those who VLC are associated with nascent autoimmunity, especially rheumatic autoimmunity. See: Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders. We’re talking about triglycer Continue reading >>

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

Ketosis Experiment Update: I Yield

Ketosis Experiment Update: I Yield

As one commenter put it, I’ve cravenly gone “running back to my ‘safe starches'” after experimenting with nutritional ketosis (NK) for a paltry 6 days. After my update last Thursday, I made it one more day and then gave up. The meal pictured here was the safe starch bomb that rescued me from NK. It was a banana tapioca crepe topped with an entire 10-ounce bag of frozen blackberries cooked in a tablespoon of maple syrup. It was amazing. And it was my second helping, if you couldn’t tell by my soiled plate :) Here’s what happened. I felt like ass last week. I thought I’d felt fatigued before in my life, but I was wrong. For 6 days I felt the cold grips of death taking hold of my body. Plus, I’ve never felt so limited and trapped in a diet before in my life, and I’m pretty freaking good at being on restrictive diets. One commenter said she snacks on bacon grease and butter on this diet. Honestly, kudos to her, but if I did that I think I’d throw up, and either way I can’t do that because I don’t eat butter. So I was at my emotional limit of fat intake at 70+% of my diet. If I could eat cream, butter, or cheese, I may not have felt so limited and bored by my options. I don’t eat dairy, nuts, seeds, or olive oil (sensitive to all), so my fats were the following. Avocados Bacon grease Bacon Coconut oil Coconut milk Coconut manna Any other fat from meat I ate the following on one typical day. Breakfast 1 egg with veggies and salsa 3 pieces bacon 1 tablespoon bacon grease to cook it all in 1/2 avocado 2 tablespoons coconut manna Lunch 3 oz chicken 3/4 avocado with some salsa 1/2 carrot 1/2 celery stalk Dinner Very high fat pork chili with some veggies cooked in a tablespoon extra bacon grease Before bed because I was STARVING 3 tablespoons coconut mann Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

An Update On 'tingling' Tongue Problem While On A Low-carb Diet

An Update On 'tingling' Tongue Problem While On A Low-carb Diet

I receive quite a bit of e-mail from people on a daily basis who have all sorts of questions about livin’ la vida low-carb. And it quite literally runs the gamut from how do you start on a low-carb diet to why have I “only” lost 10 pounds after two weeks to some really serious health concerns that people are worried their low-carb diet is either causing or exacerbating. I’ve seen it all and I happily answer every single one of these e-mails by responding myself or copying in any number of the low-carb expert friends I have had the privilege of interviewing on my podcast show. It’s a privilege to be able to serve my readers who have honest questions that they feel need to be addressed. But I do happen to think it’s funny how whenever someone on a low-carb diet gets something odd going on with their body, the first thing many of them tend to blame is the diet itself. I addressed this subject in a blog post a few years back because I was seeing it time and time again from well-meaning people who wanted to know why low-carb was doing this or that to them. I never understood that because you don’t hear people walking around with various aches and pains stating, “Darn that low-fat, high-carb diet!” It just doesn’t happen unless you are on low-carb. Human nature can be a strange lot. I wanted to provide an update on an e-mail that I blogged about in 2005 from a reader at the time who was experiencing a “tingling” sensation in her tongue claiming that it only happened when she was on the low-carb lifestyle. Honestly, I was perplexed at this one and could explain what was physically happening to her. What I did know at the time was that it didn’t seem plausible that eating a carbohydrate-restricted diet could lead to this kind of funky symptom, but I wa Continue reading >>

The Skinny On Dieting And Your Teeth

The Skinny On Dieting And Your Teeth

Embarking on a new diet? You’ve probably got your waistline, not your teeth, in mind. But weight-loss diets can have a major impact on your oral health. Find out how popular dieting strategies can affect your mouth. Low-fat diet Eating a diet low in fat can interfere with the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, such as A, D, E and K. Vitamin D is especially important for oral health — it helps the body absorb calcium. When your body can’t absorb calcium, your teeth and bones start to break down. What’s more, fat helps your brain produce dopamine, a chemical neurotransmitter that improves your mood. When your diet lacks omega-3 fatty acids, your stress and anxiety will increase. Stress can lead to tooth grinding (bruxism) and can worsen pain from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ). Finally, manufacturers often add sugar to reduced-fat products to maintain taste and texture. That added sugar means a higher chance of cavities. Low-carb and ketogenic diets When you’re on a low- or no-carb diet, one way you can tell it’s working is if your breath starts to smell like nail polish remover. The unique scent of acetone — or sometimes rotten fruit — is a tell-tale sign of ketosis, the process in which your body starts burning fat instead of carbohydrates for fuel, releasing chemicals called ketones. You can get rid of keto-breath by drinking more water, brushing your teeth and tongue regularly and chewing on natural breath fresheners like parsley and mint. Not surprisingly, though, the most effective way to freshen your breath again is by eating carbs. And that may not be a bad idea, considering high levels of ketones can induce ketoacidosis, an illness in which your blood levels grow dangerously acidic. An overload of ketones can also make your body start to Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Source Ketosis is the name for a state achieved on a low-carbohydrate diet. According to WebMD, when you are in ketosis, it means your body is burning fat for energy. When that happens, your body releases ketones into your bloodstream, and you are in ketosis. This state may cause a host of temporary symptoms. Understanding the Symptoms Many dieters develop symptoms that let them know ketones are present. For many people beginning a low-carb diet, ketosis kicks in after a few days of strict adherence to the diet. In fact, many low-carbohydrate plans, such as Atkins and paleo, have an initial phase in which dieters take in extremely low amounts of carbohydrates (usually less than 25 grams per day) to kick start ketosis. You can test for ketones in the urine using ketosis strips, or rely on symptoms to tell you ketosis has been achieved. Early Stages Symptoms of ketosis vary, depending how long you've been in the state. In the early stages, the symptoms may be a bit unpleasant. However, as your body adapts to ketones in the bloodstream, symptoms may decrease. Early symptoms usually last for several days or up to a week in some people. This period of symptoms is sometimes called the keto flu. It may continue until your body is used to burning fat instead of glucose. Afterwards, the levels of ketones should lessen, but that doesn't mean you aren't losing weight. It means your body has found a balance and is no longer producing excess ketones. According to Diet Doctor, early stage symptoms include: Flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache Nausea Brain fog Constipation Leg cramps Feeling unusually thirsty Irritability Heart palpitations Dry mouth Ketosis breath, which smells fruity and unpleasant Decreased energy and weakness Dizziness Sleep problems Cold hands and feet Continue reading >>

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

Does Keto//os Have Any Side Effects?

Does Keto//os Have Any Side Effects?

Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores. This can be rectified by supplementing with a good electrolyte or increasing the sodium in your diet. However KETO//OS adds additional sodium to the formulation to counter-act this sodium depletion. The first signs of dehydration are fatigue, headache, dizziness, dry mouth, swollen tongue, constipation, possible elevation of blood pressure, palpitations or muscle cramping. If this occurs, decrease your serving size of Uncharged Keto//OS or BioMax, drink plenty of water. KETO//OS 2.1 and Keto Kreme is blended with medium chain triglycerides, which can often times cause digestive distress. This is due to the fact that your body has not yet adapted to the increased fats in your diet, and is less efficient at utilizing ketones as its fuel source. Once the body has adapted to this increased fat in the diet, the digestive distress should resolve. We recommend to start slowly with a reduced serving size and build up to a full serving twice a day, but it is totally up to the individual. If diarrhea, stomach cramping or constipation occur, reduce your serving size of Keto//OS and/or consume Keto//OS with food (fat or protein) until bowel movements have returned to normal. Do not increase Keto//OS if you are experience digestive stress. Please make sure that you are drinking enough water and taking a multi-mineral supplement or an/ electrolyte. Experiencing Diarrhea and cramping then decrease Keto//OS, drink slower (over 20-30minutes) and consume with food. This will slow down the absorption of the exogenous ketones. Do not increase Keto//OS until bowel movements have returned to normal and use the uncharged version. Experiencing Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

What is ketosis? Being in ketosis is truly a magical thing. Ketosis happens when your body starts producing ketone bodies instead of utilizing carbohydrates as energy. Both can be used as energy sources, but I find that converting to a fat-burner over a carbohydrate-burner to be most favorable. Signs of being in ketosis There are a few signs that could suggest you’re in ketosis: a metallic taste in mouth strong smelling urine random bursts of happiness (it’s weird, but it’s true!) decreased appetite How to get into ketosis The best way to get into ketosis is to immediately drop all major carb sources in your diet and focus on high-quality fats. Some find that going extremely low carb for a couple days will jumpstart ketone production and ultimately reaching a state of ketosis. Initially when you first remove a majority of carbohydrates from your diet, most people experience signs of lethargy and flu-like symptoms. This is what people consider the “low carb flu.” The low carb flu could last anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks. It’s important to stay extremely hydrated on a ketogenic diet, so much make sure you’re getting enough water and electrolytes. If you’re one of the lucky ones, you won’t experience any low carb flu symptoms at all. Carbohydrate tolerance varies from person to person to maintain a ketogenic state. Some report that they can eat up to 80 grams and still be in ketosis. A safe spot for most people seems to be between 20-30 grams. Benefits of being in ketosis You will find it hard to believe that an array of benefits can be obtained from following a ketogenic diet, but the proof is in the research! Some of these include: Effortless weight loss Awesome blood sugar regulation Reduced blood pressure Reduced inflammation Appetite Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

Any diet, by definition, is a group of foods consumed for a certain period of time. A “diet” can be as simple as an average daily meal or it can also be part of a treatment program for specific medical conditions. The ketogenic diet, which allows someone to enter a state of nutritional “ketosis”, has long been used in the treatment of epilepsy in children – but its benefits go way beyond this. As you’ll learn, recent studies show that a ketogenic diet can have many uses and benefits – including weight loss, reduced inflammation, cancer-prevention, as more. History of Ketogenic Diets The ketogenic diet was first introduced in 1924 at the Mayo clinic by Dr. Russel Wilder who started the diet to treat epileptic patients. He put his patients on a “fast” and found that epileptic symptoms became less frequent. The popularity of this diet as a means of controlling epilepsy has decreased since this time since powerful anticonvulsant drugs have been invented, but this doesn’t mean that ketogenic diets are not promoted for better health any longer. Since its introduction in the 1920s, the ketogenic diet and entering ketosis remains controversial until today. Although it has many benefits and is a natural approach to controlling disease in some cases, many doctors and patients often find it easier to administer pills than to adhere to a ketogenic diet that they find “strict’ and restrictive. The exact mechanism by which the ketogenic diet works still isn’t 100% known, but the results of ketosis that have been researched for years are staggering. What is A Ketogenic Diet? Today ketogenic diets get the most attention when it comes to weight loss and blood sugar control. “Burn fat by eating more fat” is one simple way to describe the approach that allows Continue reading >>

Signs That You Are In Low-carb Ketosis

Signs That You Are In Low-carb Ketosis

The idea behind restricting your carb intake is to reach a state of ketosis in which your body, having used all its glucose stores, begins burning fat for energy. Urine and blood tests can confirm ketosis, but certain signs can also reveal the body's switch from glucose use to ketones for fuel, including the presence of acetone breath, a decrease in appetite and constipation. While low-carb diets help you lose weight, not much is known about the long-term effects of ketosis, so you should consult with your doctor before starting a low-carb diet. Video of the Day Noticeable Signs of Ketosis It takes about three to four days for your body to burn through your glucose and start using fat for energy. One of the first things you -- or more likely your friends -- may notice once you hit ketosis is your breath. Ketone production creates acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyric acid and acetone. Acetone is a toxic chemical you may know better as nail polish remover. It causes your breath to smell sweet or fruity, similar to nail polish. Feeling less hungry may also be a sign you've reached ketosis. Its been theorized that ketosis affects appetite hormones, decreasing your desire to eat, according to a 2013 article published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Although not a pleasant sign, constipation may also indicate ketosis. Without carbs, you're not getting enough fiber, which may make it more difficult to have a bowel movement. Measurable Signs of Ketosis Your breath, appetite and bowel function may indicate you're in ketosis, but you may want to confirm it with measurable tools. Your body excretes ketones through urine. Urine ketone testing strips, which you can find at your local pharmacy, are commonly used to test for ketosis. These strips may be able to tell you wh Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Fuzzy Tongue?

Ketosis And Fuzzy Tongue?

Hi hackers, it seems to be a common symptom of fasting or carb restriction, nevertheless it's really annoying - this white fuzzy tongue. I really like the benefits of ketone bodies and eat lots of ketogenic coconut oil and limit my carb consumption to less than 80g per day. But whenever I do that my tongue gets this white coating. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb you will never lose belly fat. healthplus50.com Is it somehow possible to be in ketosis and have a normal pink tongue? And what's actually causing this condition? I read somewhere that it might be fungi thriving on ketones, any experiences? Thanks :) Continue reading >>

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

One of the questions people who are new to the LCHF (keto/ketogenic/low carb) diet frequently ask me is: how do I know if I’m in ketosis? What are the main signs of ketosis? Everyone’s different and while some may experience all of the symptoms of ketosis, some might only feel a couple of them. Some feel none at all. There are basic signs and symptoms that indicate that you’re in ketosis. But please note that I’m differentiating between the signs of keto flu (covered in the post I’m linking to) that many experience in the first days of a ketogenic diet, and the feeling of being in ketosis when the flu has subsided: Dry mouth (eat more salt and drink more water to alleviate this). See my keto breath article here. Weight loss. Yay! Metallic taste in your mouth or a strange taste in the back of your throat. Some describe it as fruity or a little sweet. A kind of “buzzing” feeling that’s hard to describe. Almost euphoric at times. Different kind of urine smell, stronger too! “Ketosis breath” – It can range from being a little sweet to being almost like you’ve had a drink of alcohol. Less appetite. You can go for hours without eating and don’t feel very hungry. Increased energy. If you don’t experience it try to eat more fat. Also, drink more water and watch your electrolytes. A ketone strip you pee on shows a positive result. There are also blood ketone meters, or the popular ketone breath test, that give a more specific result. (Pro-tip: If you get the pee strips, cut them in half ) But do note that even with a positive pee strip it’s not 100% certain that you’re in ketosis. A very dark positive result may only indicate that you’re dehydrated. For me personally, the main signs of ketosis are hard to miss. I just feel different! It’s hard Continue reading >>

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