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Sore Tongue Ketosis

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb diets may be good for your waistline, but you might not be able to say the same for your breath. Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic! Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet. "Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. Pass the Bread? This is not an oral hygiene problem, Burrell says, so "all the brushing, flossing, and scraping of the tongue that you can do is not possibly enough to overcome this." The bottom line is that you must "reconsider the diet and modify it so this doesn't happen," he says. Sure, "there may be some ways to mask it by using mouthwashes, but you can't overcome the fundamental problem other than by changing the diet -- or at least introducing some carbohydrates." "It's a difficult problem to solve because if one uses any sucking candy or lozenge, one has to be careful that it has no sugar in it" as sugar is a big no-no on many low-carb eating plans, says S. Lawrence Simon, DDS, a New York City periodon Continue reading >>

Jaw Pain: 3 Little Known Causes Of Tmj

Jaw Pain: 3 Little Known Causes Of Tmj

For years doctors and dentists believed that malocclusion (teeth that don’t line up correctly) cause pain in the TMJ. However, newer research shows that while structural abnormalities may be part of the picture, this disorder is also associated with biological, behavioral and cognitive factors. This is a guest post written by staff dietitian Kelsey Marksteiner, RD. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) cause pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and those with TMD usually have difficulty opening their mouths widely and may experience clicking or popping of the joint. TMD is also associated with neck and tooth pain, as well as dizziness and tinnitus. In this article, I’ll describe some of the current theories regarding TMD and what you should do to improve your symptoms if you suffer from this painful condition. HPA Axis Dysregulation Anyone with TMD can attest that stress tends to make their symptoms worse. When you’re stressed your muscles tense, and in the case of TMD, this clenching can cause pain. But stress also causes physiological changes in the body that can lead to symptoms. Those with TMD have been shown to have altered cortisol rhythms indicative of HPA axis dysregulation (i.e. “adrenal fatigue”). They have high levels of cortisol in the morning, and also exhibit an enhanced release of cortisol when stressed. (1, 2) Pain itself is a stressor, so it’s important to note that there have also been studies looking at TMD patients who had resolved their pain that also show elevated levels of cortisol, indicating that it is not just the pain causing higher levels of this stress hormone. (3) While the normal response to acute stress is an increase in pain tolerance, researchers have shown in rat TMD models that chronic stress causing HPA axis dysre Continue reading >>

Signs That You Are In Low-carb Ketosis

Signs That You Are In Low-carb Ketosis

The idea behind restricting your carb intake is to reach a state of ketosis in which your body, having used all its glucose stores, begins burning fat for energy. Urine and blood tests can confirm ketosis, but certain signs can also reveal the body's switch from glucose use to ketones for fuel, including the presence of acetone breath, a decrease in appetite and constipation. While low-carb diets help you lose weight, not much is known about the long-term effects of ketosis, so you should consult with your doctor before starting a low-carb diet. Video of the Day Noticeable Signs of Ketosis It takes about three to four days for your body to burn through your glucose and start using fat for energy. One of the first things you -- or more likely your friends -- may notice once you hit ketosis is your breath. Ketone production creates acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyric acid and acetone. Acetone is a toxic chemical you may know better as nail polish remover. It causes your breath to smell sweet or fruity, similar to nail polish. Feeling less hungry may also be a sign you've reached ketosis. Its been theorized that ketosis affects appetite hormones, decreasing your desire to eat, according to a 2013 article published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Although not a pleasant sign, constipation may also indicate ketosis. Without carbs, you're not getting enough fiber, which may make it more difficult to have a bowel movement. Measurable Signs of Ketosis Your breath, appetite and bowel function may indicate you're in ketosis, but you may want to confirm it with measurable tools. Your body excretes ketones through urine. Urine ketone testing strips, which you can find at your local pharmacy, are commonly used to test for ketosis. These strips may be able to tell you wh Continue reading >>

The Interplay Of Exercise And Ketosis – Part Ii

The Interplay Of Exercise And Ketosis – Part Ii

You’ll recall from last week’s post I did a self-experiment to see if I could learn something about the interplay of exercise and ketosis, at least in myself. To understand this discussion, you’ll want to have read Part I of this post. However, before getting to this, I want to digress and briefly address two unrelated issues: Some of you (about 67 or 68 as of this writing) have sent me various links to news reports released yesterday reporting on a study out of Harvard’s School of Public Health. I was planning to eventually write a post about how observational epidemiology is effectively at the heart of the nutritional crises we face – virtually every nutrition-based recommendation (e.g., eat fiber, don’t eat fat, salt is bad for you, red meat is bad for you) we hear is based on this sort of work. Given this study, and the press it’s getting, I will be writing the post on observational epidemiology next week. However, I’m going to ask you all to undertake a little “homework assignment.” Before next week I would suggest you read this article by Gary Taubes from the New York Times Magazine in 2007 which deals with this exact problem. I confirmed this week that someone (i.e., me) can actually eat too much of my wife’s ice cream (recipe already posted here –pretty please with lard on top no more requests for it). On two consecutive nights I ate about 4 or 5 bowls of the stuff. Holy cow did I feel like hell for a few hours. The amazing part is that I did this on two consecutive nights. Talk about addictive potential. Don’t say I didn’t warn you… OK, back to the purpose of this post: How is ketosis impacting my ability to exercise? Here is the summary of the results from my personal experiment: Let’s take a closer look at what may have been go Continue reading >>

Prurigo Pigmentosa – The Ketosis Rash Nobody Warned Me About

Prurigo Pigmentosa – The Ketosis Rash Nobody Warned Me About

While I haven’t had this rash, I have been on ketogenic diets a few times, usually with herxheimer symptoms. I believe this origined from candida die-off because I had the exact same feeling when on antifungal drugs. It was worst the first times, then substantially less, and during my third course of antifungals I felt nothing. This would suggest the fungal infection had diminished a lot by then. Also, my reactions when on a ketogenic diet were worst the first time, but less so (and with later onset) during subsequent diets. I never dieted in order to lose weight – I am skinny already – but only as a remedy (somewhat desperately) against candida. I had some very bad years where I would react from all kinds of simple carbs, and since doctors didn’t help me a lot, I had to find something myself. In the end, however, my GP did prescribe fluconazol for a month which helped. I did have a rash once, however. All over my torso when I was 22, 16 years ago. My doctor first thought this was pityriasis rosea, a common and harmless rash. Then I got transferred to a dermatologist who diagnosed psoriasis, but at that time, the torso rash had disappeared. Since then, I have had a litle psoriasis on my elbows, but rarely elsewhere. Skin rashes are often a sign of immunological changes – and of infections, of course, as we know from common childhood diseases. (But isn’t the rash of e.g. measles caused by the immune reaction, rather than directly from the infection itself?) But regarding that many of you had a month or year-long and stable rash when being in ketosis, there might be other causes. As I understand, the effect of doxycycline here is not as an antibiotic, but because doxycyline has a direct impact on neutrophils (a sort of white blood cells). It is also well-known Continue reading >>

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

What’s Causing A Sweet Taste In My Mouth?

What’s Causing A Sweet Taste In My Mouth?

What is this condition? Sweetness is one of at least five basic tastes detected by the tongue’s taste buds. Others include sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and a balanced flavor called umami. Normally you’ll only taste sweetness after eating something that contains sugar. This could be something more natural, like honey or fruit, or something processed, like ice cream. Some medical conditions can cause a person to experience a sweet taste in their mouth even if they haven’t eaten something sweet. Continue reading to learn more. Doctors are still learning more about the causes of this unusual symptom. However, some causes appear to include: Metabolic problems, such as diabetes, ketosis, or a thyroid disorder. Metabolic disorders can affect the body’s ability to taste, causing a background sweet taste in the mouth and large preference for very sweet-tasting foods. Neurological problems, such as stroke, seizure disorder, or epilepsy. A sweet taste in the mouth can be an early symptom of neurological issues. Viruses that attack the body’s ability to smell. Disruptions in the body’s olfactory system — the system that allows the body to smell — can result in a sweet taste in the mouth. Infection in the sinuses, nose, and throat. Certain bacteria, especially pseudomonas, can cause a sweet taste in the mouth. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Stomach acid backs up into the throat and mouth, causing a sweet taste. Small cell carcinoma in the lung. A sweet taste is an early symptom of this condition. Pregnancy. Many women experience a strange taste in their mouth in the early stages of pregnancy. Some women might describe it as sweet or metallic. These conditions cause a sweet taste in the mouth by affecting the body’s sensory, or nervous, system. This is Continue reading >>

Vitamin B12 Deficiency The Masking Effect Of Folic Acid

Vitamin B12 Deficiency The Masking Effect Of Folic Acid

What is the big deal with B12? Vitamin B12 is essential for our health. On average, we need 2.4 micrograms a day. Our bodies need it to make red blood cells, nerves, DNA, and carry out other functions. Simply put, we cannot live without it. If left untreated, it may result in death. B12 deficiency - A problem of developing countries? Most people believe that B12 deficiency is a problem of only underdeveloped countries. In the USA and other developed nations, most commonly eaten foods are fortified with vitamins and minerals. Table salt is fortified with iodine the same way as flour products are enhanced with a type of B vitamin: Folic Acid. As a result, claims of B12 deficiency are easily overlooked. A study from 2000 (Framingham Offspring Study indicated that B12 deficiency is far more widespread than formerly believed. It revealed that almost 40% of studied group of 3,000 had low values of B12. This percentage is believed to be even higher these days. If the results of the studied group are extrapolated, it means that almost two fifths of the U.S. population may be suffering from vitamin B12 deficiency. There are many more recent publications suggesting that it has become a bigger problem over the last few years. Animal products are the best sources of vitamin B12, so naturally you would think: let's just eat more of them! Oddly enough, the researchers found no association between B12 levels and animal products intake. According to the Framingham Offspring Study, it’s not because people aren’t eating enough meat, rather the vitamin isn’t getting absorbed. Why does this happen? There could be many reasons as highlighted further below. This video published on 22 Jan 2013 presents cases of four misdiagnosed patients. Its aim is to raise awareness about the B12 defi Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Source Ketosis is the name for a state achieved on a low-carbohydrate diet. According to WebMD, when you are in ketosis, it means your body is burning fat for energy. When that happens, your body releases ketones into your bloodstream, and you are in ketosis. This state may cause a host of temporary symptoms. Understanding the Symptoms Many dieters develop symptoms that let them know ketones are present. For many people beginning a low-carb diet, ketosis kicks in after a few days of strict adherence to the diet. In fact, many low-carbohydrate plans, such as Atkins and paleo, have an initial phase in which dieters take in extremely low amounts of carbohydrates (usually less than 25 grams per day) to kick start ketosis. You can test for ketones in the urine using ketosis strips, or rely on symptoms to tell you ketosis has been achieved. Early Stages Symptoms of ketosis vary, depending how long you've been in the state. In the early stages, the symptoms may be a bit unpleasant. However, as your body adapts to ketones in the bloodstream, symptoms may decrease. Early symptoms usually last for several days or up to a week in some people. This period of symptoms is sometimes called the keto flu. It may continue until your body is used to burning fat instead of glucose. Afterwards, the levels of ketones should lessen, but that doesn't mean you aren't losing weight. It means your body has found a balance and is no longer producing excess ketones. According to Diet Doctor, early stage symptoms include: Flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache Nausea Brain fog Constipation Leg cramps Feeling unusually thirsty Irritability Heart palpitations Dry mouth Ketosis breath, which smells fruity and unpleasant Decreased energy and weakness Dizziness Sleep problems Cold hands and feet Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

What is ketosis? Being in ketosis is truly a magical thing. Ketosis happens when your body starts producing ketone bodies instead of utilizing carbohydrates as energy. Both can be used as energy sources, but I find that converting to a fat-burner over a carbohydrate-burner to be most favorable. Signs of being in ketosis There are a few signs that could suggest you’re in ketosis: a metallic taste in mouth strong smelling urine random bursts of happiness (it’s weird, but it’s true!) decreased appetite How to get into ketosis The best way to get into ketosis is to immediately drop all major carb sources in your diet and focus on high-quality fats. Some find that going extremely low carb for a couple days will jumpstart ketone production and ultimately reaching a state of ketosis. Initially when you first remove a majority of carbohydrates from your diet, most people experience signs of lethargy and flu-like symptoms. This is what people consider the “low carb flu.” The low carb flu could last anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks. It’s important to stay extremely hydrated on a ketogenic diet, so much make sure you’re getting enough water and electrolytes. If you’re one of the lucky ones, you won’t experience any low carb flu symptoms at all. Carbohydrate tolerance varies from person to person to maintain a ketogenic state. Some report that they can eat up to 80 grams and still be in ketosis. A safe spot for most people seems to be between 20-30 grams. Benefits of being in ketosis You will find it hard to believe that an array of benefits can be obtained from following a ketogenic diet, but the proof is in the research! Some of these include: Effortless weight loss Awesome blood sugar regulation Reduced blood pressure Reduced inflammation Appetite Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

Any diet, by definition, is a group of foods consumed for a certain period of time. A “diet” can be as simple as an average daily meal or it can also be part of a treatment program for specific medical conditions. The ketogenic diet, which allows someone to enter a state of nutritional “ketosis”, has long been used in the treatment of epilepsy in children – but its benefits go way beyond this. As you’ll learn, recent studies show that a ketogenic diet can have many uses and benefits – including weight loss, reduced inflammation, cancer-prevention, as more. History of Ketogenic Diets The ketogenic diet was first introduced in 1924 at the Mayo clinic by Dr. Russel Wilder who started the diet to treat epileptic patients. He put his patients on a “fast” and found that epileptic symptoms became less frequent. The popularity of this diet as a means of controlling epilepsy has decreased since this time since powerful anticonvulsant drugs have been invented, but this doesn’t mean that ketogenic diets are not promoted for better health any longer. Since its introduction in the 1920s, the ketogenic diet and entering ketosis remains controversial until today. Although it has many benefits and is a natural approach to controlling disease in some cases, many doctors and patients often find it easier to administer pills than to adhere to a ketogenic diet that they find “strict’ and restrictive. The exact mechanism by which the ketogenic diet works still isn’t 100% known, but the results of ketosis that have been researched for years are staggering. What is A Ketogenic Diet? Today ketogenic diets get the most attention when it comes to weight loss and blood sugar control. “Burn fat by eating more fat” is one simple way to describe the approach that allows Continue reading >>

Is My Diet Causing My Sore Tongue?

Is My Diet Causing My Sore Tongue?

My tongue is sore almost constantly. Especially the sides. Should I change my diet? What could cause this? Soreness of the tongue happens from time to time and there are a variety of causes. Fortunately, the majority of tongue problems are not serious. You've asked whether or not your sore tongue has anything to do with your diet. But what exactly is in your diet? In general, a diet that is deficient in folic acid and vitamin B-12 may cause your tongue to appear reddish and painful. That said, minor infections or irritations are the most common cause of tongue soreness. Grinding and clenching your teeth as you sleep can irritate the sides of the tongue and cause it to become painful. An inflamed taste buds can swell and form a painful bump on your tongue. Heavy smoking can irritate the tongue and make it painful. The herpes virus (HSV-1) that is the typical culprit to give you "canker sores" can cause painful ulcers on the tongue. Most sore tongues are nothing to worry about. In some instances, however, a painful tongue can indicate more serious conditions. It may be a symptom of certain medical conditions including AIDS, diabetes, and anemia or may be due to your immune system. The most worrisome is oral cancer. You should consult a primary care doctor or ENT if you have a lump or sore on your tongue that doesn't go away within a week or two to rule out tongue cancer or a serious medical condition. Good luck. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related question Continue reading >>

Tongue Blisters And How To Treat Them Naturally

Tongue Blisters And How To Treat Them Naturally

Tongue blisters in children and adults; treatment How many times has happened to you that you have a tingle in the mouth? Blisters on the tongue are particularly nasty. They peck, cause pain, create a problem while you eat and drink. White sores on the inside of the cheeks and lips are known to drive you crazy when brushing your teeth. Unfortunately, these small blisters on the tongue are common in adults, and they can come back several times. If you have been for a longer period of time exposed to stress and your immunity is weakened they will appear again. Why do these blisters occur? Do you wonder what is the best natural remedy for blisters on the tongue? Read this article and find out how you can mitigate all the problems in a natural way. What are actually blisters? Blisters on the tongue cause many inconveniences. These tiny sores may occur in almost all parts of the soft lining of the oral cavity. These are actually small wounds that are baked and very painful. Most often they are oval or circular. At first they appear as blisters white to yellowish color. They cause a feeling of irritation and burning, and when eating, drinking and brushing your teeth they cause pain. Around blisters shortly after red rings appear on its edges. Redness is actually due to inflammation of the surrounding mucosa. If you hurt it in any anyway they can bleed. Do not worry, it's not a big deal, not is it dangerous. In addition these blisters often occur in children and adolescent and are most represented in those of 20 and 40 years old. After the forties they become less common, but after 60 almost not at all. Women are much more susceptible to their appearance than men during the second half of the menstrual cycle. But it is still not clear whether there is a link between hormones a Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

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