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Situations In Which Ketosis May Occur

Ketogenic Diet: Benefits, Adverse Effect & Ketogenic Foods

Ketogenic Diet: Benefits, Adverse Effect & Ketogenic Foods

Most people can do a ketogenic diet safely.Following three situations you may need preparation for keto diet- Hypertension- medication for high blood pressure, e.g. breastfeeding-mother The benefits of a ketogenic diet are similar to those of any rigorous(strict) low-carb diet. However, the effect might be even more preponderant since protein is more restricted. This lowers insulin (the fat-storing hormone) more and raises ketones more. Weight loss Weight-lossTurning your body into a fat-burning machine has conspicuous benefits for weight loss. Fat burning is astronomically incremented while insulin – the fat storing hormone – levels drop greatly. This engenders ideal circumstances in which fat loss can occur, without hunger. More around 20 scientific studies of the highest class (RCTs) show that compared to other diets, low-carb and ketogenic diets result in more efficacious weight loss. Diabetes type 2 reversal reverse-t2-diabetes-1200A ketogenic diet is excellent for inverting type 2 diabetes since it lowers blood sugar levels and the negative impact of high insulin levels. Improved Mental (phrenic) Focus Ketosis results in a steady flow of fuel (ketones) to the encephalon(brain). And on a ketogenic diet, you avoid big voluminous swings in blood sugar. This often results in the experience of incremented focus and ameliorated concentration. A lot of people categorically use keto diets categorically for incremented mental performance. Interestingly, a common misconception that eating lots of carbs5 is needed for proper brain function. But it's only true when ketones are not available. After a few days of keto-adaptation people may experience some difficulties in concentrating, have headaches and become irritated – the brain and body can run effortlessly on ketone Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketosis Without Acidosis

Diabetic Ketosis Without Acidosis

Ketosis and Ketonuria Ketosis and Ketonuria may occur whenever increased amounts of fat are metabolized, carbohydrate intake is restricted, or the diet rich in fats (either “hidden” or obvious). This state can occur in the following situations: a. Metabolic conditions: Diabetes mellitus Renal glycosuria Glycogen storage disease (von Gierke’s disease) b. Dietary conditions: Starvation, fasting High-fat diets Prolonged vomiting, diarrhea Anorexia Low-carbohydrate diet Eclampsia c. Increased metabolic states caused by: Hyperthyroidism Fever Pregnancy or lactation In non-diabetic persons, ketonuria occurs frequently during acute illness, severe stress, or sternous exercise. Approximately 15% hospitalized patients have ketones in their urine even though they do not have diabetes. Children are particularly prone to developing ketonuria and ketosis. Ketonuria signals a need for caution, rather than crisis intervention, in either a diabetic or non-diabetic patient. However, this condition should not be taken lightly. In the diabetic patients, ketone bodies in the urine suggest that the diabetes is not adequately controlled and that adjustments of either the medication or diet should be made promptly. In the non-diabetic patients, ketone bodies indicate a reduced carbohydrate metabolism and excessive fat metabolism. Positive ketone urines in a children younger than 2 years of age is a critical alert. Difference between Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Diabetic ketosis or ketonuria The criteria for diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) include: Blood glucose >250 mg/dl Ketonemia or ketonuria (plasma beta0hydroxybutyrate >3 mmol/l or urine ketones ≥3+) pH <7.3 or serum bicarbonate <15 mEq/L In a patient with diabetes, presence of hyperglycemia and ketosis in the absence of aci Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis (dka) Vs Ketosis What’s The Difference?

Ketoacidosis (dka) Vs Ketosis What’s The Difference?

Although ketosis and ketoacidosis may sound the same, they are two distinct things. We are going to be talking about the difference between ketoacidosis and ketosis and what makes the two diverse from one another. In order to provide a good explanation of what these conditions are and how they affect the body, we must talk about their main common denominator, the ketones. These are organic compounds that the body will provide when it starts to burn stored fat instead of burning glucose or sugar when it requires energy. What is Ketoacidosis? DKA applies to diabetic ketoacidosis and is a complication of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition that makes it difficult for your body to be able to produce a good level of insulin. Your levels of ketones can rise to very dangerous levels, which will also increase your blood sugar. The ketones create a very acidic environment inside your body, and the function of certain organs will be affected severely. It becomes a life-threatening situation when presented with high levels of ketones and excess blood sugar. Anyone not given proper treatment for DKA could end up in a coma and even die. The kidneys and liver are affected more than most other organs, and this can create a very serious health issue. Once a person develops what is known as diabetic ketoacidosis, they will show severe symptoms within as little as 24 hours. When a person has type one diabetes, they are in great danger of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. What is ketosis The best way to explain ketosis is to consider it a very mild form of ketoacidosis, and the truth is that this is not going to be harmful most of the time. In your lifestyle, if you’re on a ketogenic diet nutrition plan or any long-term low-carb diet, you might be experiencing ke Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Difference Between Keto And Fat Adaptation

Difference Between Keto And Fat Adaptation

What is the difference between Ketosis and Ketoacidosis, Keto adaption and Fat adaption and something I refer to as metabolic flexibility? So let’s start with the difference between Ketosis and Ketoacidosis. Wikipedia says Ketosis is a metabolic state in which most of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides most of the energy. Dr Peter Attia of Eating Acedemy says – Ketosis is a state, achieved through significant reduction of carbohydrate intake (typically to less than 50 grams per day), at which point the body makes a fundamental change from relying on glycogen as its main source of energy to relying on fat as the primary source of energy. In particular, the brain shifts from being entirely dependent on glucose, to being primarily dependent on beta-hydroxybutyrate – a so-called “ketone body.” Ketone bodies are chemical structures made by the liver (also somewhat in the kidney) out of fatty acids, primarily. Ketosis is simply the mechanism in which the body begins to burn fat for fuel by producing ketones in the liver rather than glucose. This happens when carbohydrate/glucose is removed from the diet and the body begins to produce ketones, this is ketosis. Ketoacidosis is typically a state that occurs in T1 diabetics and is a combination of high ketones and high BG, although it can happen in other situations including alcoholics. The cause is extremely elevated ketone levels of say 15 mmol or higher and high levels of Blood Glucose. That said there is need for concern should your ketones get above say 10 mmol. Basically what happenes, the body fails to manage or regulate ketone production causing uncontrolled ketosis. It happens when the individuals BG levels are e Continue reading >>

Ketones And Ketosis

Ketones And Ketosis

According to Owsley “The Bear” Stanley This is not a dedicated nor complete article, this page is an extract from Owsley’s correspondence with others. See this page for more info. A zero carb diet does NOT cause ketosis. The body rapidly adapts within a few weeks and begins consuming the ketones from fat metabolism. A fully keto-adapted body excretes no ketones in the urine. A metabolic by product, ‘ketone bodies’ are actually a special kind of carb, and they substitute for glucose at the structures which use it. They have the added advantage of making you feel good- and well fed. Ketone metabolism is not a ‘rapid response mechanism’. Full keto-adaptation takes several weeks, and until that has been done, a slowly reducing level of ketones will spill into the urine. Once adapted, the ketones are barely present in the urine, having been used by the body (in place of glucose). You will not show ketones in your urine if there are carbs in your diet, the ketones are reprocessed- into bodyfat. Your body ONLY burns FAT for muscular work, and it burns fat all the time, 24/7. Ketones do not appear in the urine until all carbs are stopped and then the ketones will disappear again in a few weeks as your body begins using them as glucose-replacement rather than converting them, as it does all carbohydrates, into bodyfat (from which they came). BOTH a keto-adapted and carb-eating person will show no ketones in the urine. SOME people have a problem with fat metabolism while insulin is present, and glucose being converted into bodyfat, but not everyone, which is why some (a few) people do not become fat or obese no matter what they eat. Those who have a problem find any effort very hard and may fall asleep until the fat storing process is over. Ketones are a valuable nu Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

6;91.4 A 4:4'

6;91.4 A 4:4'

OIEGON sure tt.,. HIM .'"., OW. Coml. aad the U S. Cyan.. 1.4516),Nn Ketosis in Dairy Cows Prepared by D. E. ANDERSON and H. P. EWALT Extension Dairy Specialists, Oregon State University, Corvallis Ketosis, or acetonemia, might well be called a prob- lem of high production since prevention and control is more difficult with high milk production. Few animals are challenged to meet the metabolic demands that a high- producing dairy cow must adapt to during the early part of lactation. Common observations and experimental evidence show that cows may be in a negative balance for both protein and energy shortly after calving and for about the first 60 days of lactation. The following data on ketosis are taken from a summary of recent research published in the July 1968 issue of the Journal of Dairy Science. What Is Ketosis? Ketosis is a metabolic disorder in which something goes wrong with the normal body processes and the cow becomes sick. There are no inflammatory organisms involved and the condition is not contagious. There seems to be a situation where the cow is temporarily pro- ducing more milk and thus requiring more feed nutrients than her feed intake provides. Nature may attempt to correct this situation by using body reserves of fat. When this occurs, some intermediary products of fat metabolism, called "ketone bodies," may build up in the system. These can be detected in the milk and urine and are indications of how serious the condition may be. Ketosis may even develop in average-producing animals when the energy needs exceed the energy intake. Ketosis usually occurs more often in winter feed- ing, and three weeks after calving seems to be a very critical period for high-producing cows. Symptoms The first symptom of ketosis is a loss of appetite first for grain a Continue reading >>

Ketone Ester Effects On Metabolism And Transcription

Ketone Ester Effects On Metabolism And Transcription

Go to: PRODUCTION OF KETONE BODIES Ketone bodies are formed in the liver from free fatty acids released from adipose tissue. As the blood concentration of free fatty acids increases, concentration of blood ketone bodies is correspondingly increased (1, 2). Ketone bodies serve as a physiological respiratory substrate and are the physiological response to prolonged starvation in man (3, 4), where the blood level of ketones reaches 5–7 mM (5). If the release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue exceeds the capacity of tissue to metabolize them, as occurs during insulin deficiency of type I diabetes or less commonly in the insulin resistance of type II diabetes, severe and potentially fatal diabetic ketoacidosis can occur, where blood ketone body levels can reach 20 mM or higher (2) resulting in a decrease in blood bicarbonate to almost 0 mM and blood pH to 6.9. Diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a pathological state, differs from the ketosis of prolonged starvation, which is a normal physiological state without known medical consequences. Elevation of blood ketones can however lead to elevation of blood uric acid, which can produce a gouty crisis. This can be prevented by feeding oral potassium citrate (6) Ketosis occurs during starvation in man. It occurs only with difficulty in species other than lactating cows where ketosis can occur due to the large requirement for lactose production in milk production. This form of ketosis can be treated by the administration of glucose. In this situation, ketosis occurs because of the competition for oxaloacetate, required for gluconeogenesis, where its shortage prevents acetyl-CoA in the liver from entering the Krebs cycle with a resultant increase in ketone body production (1). In vitro, ketone body production has been observed d Continue reading >>

Fatty Acide Oxidation, Ketosis And Ketoacidosis

Fatty Acide Oxidation, Ketosis And Ketoacidosis

Sort Uptake of FA into mitochondria 1. Fatty acyl-CoA synthase fatty acid + ATP + CoA --> fatty acyl-CoA + ADP -location = outer mitochondrial membrane -fatty acyl-CoA cannot cross innner membrane of mito 2. Carnitine Palmitoyl transferase I (CPT I) Fatty acyl-coA + Carnitine --> fatty acyl-carnitine + CoA -fatty acyl-carnitine enters mito matrix through carnitine-fatty-acyl carnitine translocase 3. Carnitine Palmitoyl transferase II (CPT II) fatty acy carniitine + CoA --> fatty acyl-CoA + carnitine -carnitine returns to inter membrane space through carninitine fatty acyl carnitine translocase B-oxidation of FA's -Takes place in mitochondria -each round fatty acyl-CoA's are shortened by 2 Carbons releasing CoA -Oxidizing agents = NAD+ and FAD+ -Energy production = NADH + FADH2 = 25% of energy production, acetyl-CoA = 75% of energy production Reaction = fatty acyl coA + NAD+ + FAD+ --> fatty acyl-CoA + CoA + NADH + FADH2 Reguatlion of fatty acid oxidation 1. Insulin = ihibition, epinephrine = activation 2. Muscle cells = regulate concentration of FA transporters 3. Malonyl CoA = inhibits CPT I, inhibiting FA uptake -Note: liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase I synthesizes malonyl-coA in fed state, in muscle acetyl-CoA carboxylase II synthesizes malonyl-coA in fasting state or where there's high AMP (ATP inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase II) 4. PPAR-a --> increases B-oxidation by influencing transcription of enzymes involved -Note: Fibrates = a drug class that lowers triglyceride levels in blood by activating PPAR-a Diseases of FA oxidation -w/o FA oxidation in fasting state, body uses more glucose for energy production. THis glucose can only come from glycogenolysis b/c gluconeogenesis can only occur w/ the input of energy from FA oxidation. -Result = severe hypoglycemia in period Continue reading >>

Natural Ketosis Blog Archive

Natural Ketosis Blog Archive

Not only can stress influence your behaviours, but having high stress levels on a day to day basis can result in chronically elevated cortisol levels. High cortisol levels are strongly associated with weight gain and can make losing weight much more difficult. Hormones which increase your appetite can also be activated when stressed and can cause behaviours or habits to occur that involve comfort eating or emotional eating. In this blog we aim to give you some hints and tips on how best to manage these situations. Stressed? What do you do? Unfortunately it is not always possible to avoid stress altogether, with many situations requiring action so that long term stress does not occur. As everyone has a unique response to stress, you will have to find the right solution to managing it. Discover what makes you feel calm and in control by trying the following options: 1. Try changing the solution: If it is too difficult for you to avoid a stressful situation, then try to change it. Figure out what you can do so that if the problem arises again, you know how to cope with it straight away: a. Don’t bottle up your feelings - make sure you have someone to talk to, either a family member or the NK support team. This is important as your weight loss journey will be filled with lots of different emotions. b. Be more assertive - deal with problems head on, don’t avoid them. This will help you to anticipate problems in the future c. Manage your time- if you find yourself eating sweet treats due to running out of time, such as when working to a deadline, make a set-list of what you need to do and stick to this in order to manage your time. 2. Try adjusting to the stressor: If it is too difficult to change the situation, try adjusting to the stressful situation instead. This will Continue reading >>

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet On The Quality Of Life In 16 Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Pilot Trial

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet On The Quality Of Life In 16 Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Pilot Trial

Go to: Abstract Tumor patients exhibit an increased peripheral demand of fatty acids and protein. Contrarily, tumors utilize glucose as their main source of energy supply. Thus, a diet supplying the cancer patient with sufficient fat and protein for his demands while restricting the carbohydrates (CHO) tumors thrive on, could be a helpful strategy in improving the patients' situation. A ketogenic diet (KD) fulfills these requirements. Therefore, we performed a pilot study to investigate the feasibility of a KD and its influence on the quality of life of patients with advanced metastatic tumors. Sixteen patients with advanced metastatic tumors and no conventional therapeutic options participated in the study. The patients were instructed to follow a KD (less than 70 g CHO per day) with normal groceries and were provided with a supply of food additives to mix a protein/fat shake to simplify the 3-month intervention period. Quality of life [assessed by EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 2)], serum and general health parameters were determined at baseline, after every two weeks of follow-up, or after drop out. The effect of dietary change on metabolism was monitored daily by measuring urinary ketone bodies. Results One patient did not tolerate the diet and dropped out within 3 days. Among those who tolerated the diet, two patients died early, one stopped after 2 weeks due to personal reasons, one felt unable to stick to the diet after 4 weeks, one stopped after 6 and two stopped after 7 and 8 weeks due to progress of the disease, one had to discontinue after 6 weeks to resume chemotherapy and five completed the 3 month intervention period. These five and the one who resumed chemotherapy after 6 weeks report an improved emotional functioning and less insomnia, while several other parame Continue reading >>

Lipids 4

Lipids 4

Sort Lipids are included in the diet for several reasons. Lipids in the diet provide a source of the ___ ___ ___. They are often added to the diet as a concentrated source of ___. A small amount of added fat increases ___ and decreases ___ of a feed. They are required in the diet ONLY to provide ___ ____ ____. essential fatty acids energy palatability dustiness essential fatty acids There are few stated requirements for the EFA. This is a current area of research and greater detail on the requirements and roles of specific fatty acids will likely be available as more research is completed. While these amounts are small, they are critical to ____ function. body ___-___ acid (ω-3) is required, although there are few specifics on the required amount. Generally the thinking is that a ___ percentage in the diet is required than for linoleic acid. A recent publication of Nutrient Requirements of Dogs and Cats (NRC, 2006) suggests the sum of ____ (EPA, C20:5, ω-3) and ____ (DHA, C22:6, ω-3) fatty acids, included in the diet should be ___ to ___%. alpha-linolenic smaller eicosapentaenoic docosahexaenoic 0.01 0.04 Dairy cow - ___ to ___% added fat: This is usually included in early ____ to increase energy without adding more grain. It also gives the flexibility to add energy and maintain ___ levels in the diet. The fiber is needed for proper ____ function. ____ ____ is a feedstuff that is often used. ____, an escape fat source, is another example. 4-6 lactation fiber rumen whole cottonseed megalac Horse - ___ to ___% added: Fat may be added to the diet of high ___ horses. The fatty acids provide energy for ___ and spare ___ because a greater proportion of the energy used by muscle is generated from ___. Vegetable oils, such as ___ oil, ___ oil, or ___ oil are often added. 8-1 Continue reading >>

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