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Sides Hurt On Keto

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

The low carb lifestyle is known to sculpt some serious fat off your body. Many followers of the keto diet experience rapid weight loss, low hunger levels, and good energy levels. Since you cut out most of the high sugar foods, controlling your calories becomes a breeze. Sounds like an easy plan to success, right? Those who joined the ketogenic army can attest that the early weight loss comes with a toll. The first week of low carb living can be daunting, both mentally and physically. As your brain and body are adapting to a life without glucose, you may become outright miserable. Don’t go shoving cake down your neck just yet – the misery passes. To have an idea what you’ll go through, check out these common side effects that most go through when switching to a keto diet. Usually they only last for the first few days to a week, but preparing yourself for what might come will always help. Mental and Physical Fogginess The first major sign – coming 2 or 3 days into your ketogenic transition – will be the fogginess. You’re brain likes to take it easy and it if had a choice, would run on only glucose. As your body is switching from glucose to ketones as its main source of energy, your body will continue to burn the last stores of glycogen. This results in a foggy haze that might make it hard to concentrate. You might find yourself staring into space or feeling lethargic, but have no fear – it will pass. Headaches might pound at your door, nausea can pit in your stomach, muscle cramps can ruin your day and irritability can spark arguments, but knowing this can help you plan. Switch your diet in the middle of the week, so you will have the weekend to fully rest and recover from your transition. What we suggest is to go super low carb for the first week, which mea Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Ketogenic Diets On Inflammation And Chronic Pain

The Effects Of Ketogenic Diets On Inflammation And Chronic Pain

A great unmet need exists for pain therapies that are non-addictive and/or address pain that remains intractable to treatments available currently. Opiates, the most powerful drugs to treat pain, pose serious side effects and addictive potential and are sometimes ineffective. Two major non-opioid strategies to address pain are focused on either reducing inflammation and inflammatory pain (particularly relevant to arthritis) or reducing neural activity and neuropathic pain (particularly relevant to diabetes and nerve injury). There is emerging evidence to suggest that a ketogenic diet may alleviate pain. A ketogenic diet is a regimen that it is high in fat and low in carbohydrates, similar to the Atkins diet. The carbohydrate restriction decreases the metabolism of glucose and increases the metabolism of ketones. To date, the ketogenic diet has shown proven clinical efficacy in epilepsy and demonstrated basic research potential for neuroprotection in several types of acute and chronic brain injuries. A number of biochemical consequences of a ketogenic diet - decreased reactive oxygen species, decreased neural activity, increased adenosine and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors - all suggest that a ketogenic diet will be effective in increasing baseline pain thresholds and reducing both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Our central hypothesis is that a ketogenic diet will alleviate pain, including intractable pain, based on its anti-inflammatory potential and akin to its success in treating intractable epilepsy. Despite multiple lines of evidence supporting our central hypothesis, the efficacy of a ketogenic diet in treating pain has not been tested either clinically or in animal models. The present objective is to test the effects of a ketogenic d Continue reading >>

Keto Os Review

Keto Os Review

Created by Prüvit, Keto OS, which stands for Ketone Operating System, is a “revolutionary drink mix based on a proprietary ketone energy technology. It delivers advanced macro nutritionals and promotes optimized cellular regeneration, energy and longevity.” [1] Also known as the keto diet, KETO OS is a line of supplements that promise to turbocharge your metabolism and send your body into ketosis without resorting to the draconian no-carb, all-fat diet. The History of Ketones Known for centuries, it wasn’t until a hundred years ago that ketones (Beta-hydroxybutyrate) were used to treat seizures in kids with epilepsy. A “neuroprotective effect” was produced, which calms the nervous system. Soon researchers were exploring an expanded use of ketones to help with mental, emotional and cognitive health, according to Prüvit spokesperson Andra “Dr. Andy” Campitelli , a naturopathic doctor. She says ketone use was expanded as a tool to enhance athletic performance. Ketones result when the body burns fat for fuel. [2] Prüvit on Better Business Bureau There are two Prüvit profiles on the Better Business Bureau site, one in Indiana and one in Texas. Both sell Prüvit products, but have no website link. The Texas profile has an F rating, mostly for lack of response to customer complaints about return issues. The Indiana profile has an A rating, but no reviews or complaints, and it’s only been open a year. Neither profile lists the CEO the same as the website. There is no phone contact on either the Prüvit website or the Texas BBB profile, only an “Ask a Question” form that goes via email. The Indiana profile does have a phone number: (812) 631-4282. [3] [4] [5] What Keto OS Does? So Prüvit claims Keto OS supplementation helps shed fat, build a better body Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

You’ve probably seen dozens of headlines about the ketogenic diet by now, which has made its way into popular culture largely by celebrities and supermodels giving the long-standing fad diet a repeated stamp of approval. Is this the diet to follow if you have diabetes? Studies suggest the answer isn’t so simple. Some science shows its meal plan may be helpful, while other research, like one study published in September 2016 in Nutrients, highlights the importance of whole grains in the diets of people with diabetes — a restricted food category in the ketogenic diet. While the keto diet can offer many potential benefits for diabetes management, following it requires pretty serious commitment. So take a beat before you take the plunge — and consider these questions that can help you and your medical team determine if it’s right for you: How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work Exactly? There’s a good reason the ketogenic diet is also referred to as a low-carb, high-fat diet. Indeed, following the ketogenic diet means reducing carbohydrate intake to typically less than 50 grams (g) of carbohydrates per day, while increasing fat and protein intake, according to a review published in August 2013 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. To put that into perspective, an individual on an average, non-restricted diet can easily eat more carbohydrates than that in one typical meal — for instance, a turkey, cheese, and veggie sandwich on whole-grain bread with a small, 1 ounce (oz) bag of classic potato chips would come in at around 51 g of carbs. These dietary changes drive down insulin levels, eventually leading your body into a state of ketosis, during which it is burning fat rather than carbohydrates. What Are Some of the Potential Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet for Continue reading >>

‘strange Pain’ In Side Related To Low-carb?

‘strange Pain’ In Side Related To Low-carb?

A reader e-mailed me yesterday about something that reminded me of something my wife Christine has been going through this year. You might remember me talking about Christine having a mysterious pain in her side that was causing her a lot of pain and test after test after test kept coming back negative. Finally, she saw a surgeon about it last month and he determined it was her gall bladder. It was removed a few weeks ago and Christine is now feeling a million times better. So when I read about this very active 26-year-old, 115-pound woman having “a strange pain appear on my lower right abdominal side,” I immediately perked up. However, unlike Christine who is NOT livin’ la vida low-carb, this woman has been on a low-carb diet for health reasons since April 2006 and was seeing fantastic improvements in her health and skin. But then that “strange pain” hit her with a nearly constant feeling that felt like she was “stabbed inside, swollen, crampy.” It has come and gone several times, but has gotten progressively worse and worse with no signs of improvement. She has gotten tested with x-rays, an ultrasound of various regions of her abdomen, blood tests and everything has come back normal. In fact, since she started livin’ la vida low-carb, her lipid profile has been excellent and she has not had any problems with indigestion or acid reflux. One area of her health that has change is her period cycle which she said has been “messed up” since all of this started. “I bleed between periods for a day or two, and also the first period after I began with my low-carb diet was missing (or was at least very delayed),” she wrote. There are a lot of things this could be and I wrote back to her stating I am by no means an expert on these kinds of conditions, espe Continue reading >>

The 5:2 Diet Works — But The Side Effects Are Pain, Misery And Bad Breath

The 5:2 Diet Works — But The Side Effects Are Pain, Misery And Bad Breath

The body is a temple. In January, for the most part, it is a rather large and overfed temple. This year, under the pressure of constant lifestyle and dietary advice, I decided on a remedy: the intermittent fasting diet. The regime, which instructs dieters to feast for five days a week and fast for the remaining two, originally took the States by storm in 2013. It has gradually crept over the pond, with numerous bestselling books (The Fast Diet: Lose Weight, Stay Healthy, Live Longer and The Fast Diet Recipe Book) and celebrity adherents (Benedict Cumberbatch). In fact, it’s not just contemporary ‘celebs’ who are singing its praises: Plato once said ‘I fast for greater physical and mental efficiency’; Aristotle was said to be a faster, too. Martin Luther announced: ‘It is right to fast frequently in order to subdue and control the body.’ So what is it? The diet — more commonly known as the 5:2 diet — dictates that you only need acknowledge it twice a week. On these ‘fasting days’, dieters are advised to consume 25 per cent of the recommended daily calorie intake (that’s 500 calories a day for women, and 600 for men). The 5:2 was originally championed by TV medic Dr Michael Mosley and journalist Mimi Spencer. There are, famously, two golden rules of dieting: never crash diet and never skip meals. Yet the 5:2 seemingly encourages the former, and, it would seem, does not reject the latter. A website claims that ‘it’s easy to comply with a regime that only asks you to restrict your calorie intake occasionally. It recalibrates the diet equation, and stacks the odds in your favour’. So far, so easy. Five hundred calories a day seems shockingly restrictive, yet Mosley and Spencer’s book suggests it is easily possible to divide such a meagre allow Continue reading >>

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

This is not a “feel-good” post. We are going to talk about some of the not-so-pleasant side effects of transitioning into ketosis, especially looking at why ketones (and transitioning to ketosis, in general) can cause stomach pain. We will also talk about what you can do to solve the issues. Some are practical solutions; others have to do with summoning the mental strength to just deal with a little discomfort to get the rewards and results you want. If Captain Jack Sparrow were doing the ketogenic diet, he would probably say. “The stomach pain is not the problem… it’s your attitude about the stomach pain which is the problem.” I’ve been there too. The first time I ever tried exogenous ketones, I was about 16 hours removed from carbohydrates (In-N-Out burger) and I was feeling awful. I thought Perfect Keto would make it all better. I took a heaping scoop of Peaches and Cream and waited 30 minutes. The results? Significant stomach issues, to put it kindly. I thought surely these ketones are bad and I quit my attempt to “go keto” on the spot. Why Ketosis Causes Stomach Pain The short answer is dehydration. The process of keto-adaptation is going to dehydrate us. Remember that one purpose of taking exogenous ketones is to speed up keto-adaptation. This means taking ketones will also speed up the side-effects of keto-adaptation. Why Does Ketosis Dehydrate? Transitioning to keto means we are moving from using glycogen and carbs to using fat and ketones. There are two reasons this dehydrates us. 1) One of the main inefficiencies with glycogen and carbs is that it must be stored with water. It takes 4 grams of water to store a gram of glycogen.[1] As you run through your glycogen you will lose tons of water (not literally tons but you get the point). 2) High Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Side Effects

Ketogenic Diet Side Effects

Although the adverse effects related to the ketogenic diet are generally less serve than those of anticonvulsant medications used to treat epilepsy, individuals following the diet may experience a number of undesirable effects. Short-Term Side Effects There are several short-term side effects that are most evident at the beginning of therapy, particularly when patients commence the diet with an initial fast. Hypoglycemia is a common side effect in this instance, and noticeable signs may include: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Hunger Confusion, anxiety and/or irritability Tachycardia Lightheadedness and shakiness Sweating and chills Additionally, patients may also experience some constipation and low-grade acidosis. These effects tend to improve when the diet is continued, as the body adapts to the new diet and adjust the ways in which it sources energy. Alteration in Blood Composition As a result of the changes in dietary consumption and the body’s adaptive mechanisms to cope with the reduced carbohydrate intake, there are several changes in the blood composition of individuals following the ketogenic diet. In particular, the levels of lipids and cholesterol in the blood are commonly higher than what is considered to be normal. More than 60% of patients have raised lipid levels and more than 30% have high levels of cholesterol. If these changes are profound and there is some concern about the health of the child, slight changes to the diet can be made for the individual patient. For example, saturated fat sources can be substituted for polyunsaturated fats. In some cases, it may be necessary to lower the ketogenic ratio and reduce the proportion of fat to carbohydrate and protein in the diet. Long-Term Effects When the ketogenic diet is continued for exte Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

When starting a ketogenic diet, some people experience initial side effects from carbohydrate restriction known as ‘keto flu.’ These symptoms can have some mild and potentially severe effects on the body. While the condition is popularly known as keto flu, people also commonly refer to it as induction flu, low carb flu, and Atkins flu. This article will explain what it is, why it happens, and the best strategies for avoiding or beating it. What is the Keto Flu? Firstly, it is not the real flu. It just shares the name because it has several of the same symptoms. Coming from a high carbohydrate diet, the body is well-adapted to using glucose for fuel. However, when restricting carbohydrate, the supply of glucose falls before the body has adapted to burning fat for fuel. In other words, your body is in ketosis but not fully keto-adapted. If you are curious about this, you can find out your level of ketosis by using ketone strips. The liver and gall-bladder need time to upregulate the number of fat-burning enzymes to burn larger amounts of fat efficiently. Severely restricting carbohydrate is a massive change to the way the body works and your body needs time to adjust to the metabolic changes. When Does it Start? There is no exact timeframe, but symptoms may appear as quickly as 10-12 hours after starting to restrict carbohydrate. For some people, it might be slightly earlier or later. Of course, there are also people who won’t experience the dreaded keto flu at all. How Long Does it Last? Based on anecdotes, this induction flu lasts somewhere between two days and about two weeks. The worst symptoms appear in the first few days and then taper off. Regarding the intensity of the symptoms, this likely depends on the previous diet, hormonal state, and prior carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

Pruvit Keto Os Review

Pruvit Keto Os Review

We wanted to get to the bottom of things with Keto OS. Right off the bat there was an outpouring of negative reviews on taste, making our team jump straight into the ingredients. Then we noticed a rash of comments about side effects, which was enough to make us tackle the science head on. We took the information we found, summarized it, and now share with you – the truth about Keto OS. What is Keto OS? Pruvit Keto OS supplement is a powdered drink offering weight-loss support. If this drink is as terrible as some of the customer comments make it out to be, we have a hard time believing that anyone is seeing results. Before we get into the ingredients, according to the company itself, they can cause side effects. “Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores.” And that wasn’t all. Before we get ahead of ourselves, here are the Keto OS ingredients: MCT Powder Beta-Hydroxybutyrate Stevia Keto OS Max offers the same, but l-leucine, l-taurine, and a few others are added. Just one scoop or packet a day is supposed to force you into ketosis [2], so your body burns fat instead of carbs. This idea is what low-carb diets are based on. Ketosis is not to be confused with ketoacidosis, a medical condition that can be life-threatening. Pruvit, the makers of Keto OS, started online in 2013. You have various options to choose from on the official website including a canister of powder or prepackaged servings, which makes the Keto OS diet plan a bit easier. We like the addition of caffeine but that’s not the best part. Pruvit Keto OS Competitors Product Price Review Ketopia read Ketocana read Thrive Patch read Shakeology read Burn HD (Sample offer) read Other similar produ Continue reading >>

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. These programs generally recommend that dieters get 30% to 50% of their total calories from protein. By comparison, the American Heart Association, the National Cholesterol Education Program, and the American Cancer Society all recommend a diet in which a smaller percentage of calories come from protein. Normally your body burns carbohydrates for fuel. When you drastically cut carbs, the body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, and it begins to burn its own fat for fuel. When your fat stores become a primary energy source, you may lose weight. Some experts have raised concern about high-protein, low-carb diets. High cholesterol.Some protein sources -- like fatty cuts of meat, whole dairy products, and other high-fat foods -- can raise cholesterol, increasing your chance of heart disease. However, studies showed that people on the Atkins diet for up to 2 years actually had decreased “bad” cholesterol levels. Kidney problems. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys. This could worsen kidney function. Osteoporosis and kidney stones. When you're on a high-protein diet, you may urinate more calcium than normal. There are conflicting reports, but some experts think this could make osteoporosis and kidney stones more likely. If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables, and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Risks, Is The Keto Diet Dangerous?

Keto Diet Risks, Is The Keto Diet Dangerous?

There are many people talking about the advantages of a keto diet but very few people mentioned the possible keto diet risks. This article will try to look at some of the most likely risks with a keto diet and look into if there is any truth or danger behind these statements. Keto diet risks heart problems The most common motivation why people should not go on a keto diet is the risk of having a heart attack or similar heart problems. There is a research report published by researchers at the Cincinatti Children’s Hospital Medical Center that describes possible life threatening cardiac complications. This study was made by studying children who were following a ketogenic diet to see what the possible keto diet risks were. The keto diet that the children were following was used to control seizures. In the study it mentions a 5 year old child who got heart weakening and when this was discovered they started a full study of all the children who were following the same ketogenic diet in the clinic. It was then found that 15 percentage of the children had physical and electrical heart abnormalities. The conclusion was then made that the reason for these heart abnormalities was the keto diet that they were following. The strange part with this study and what is not shown is that there was no study on how many of the children who had heart problems before they started with the keto diet. These 15 percentage with heart abnormalities could just as well have had these problems before starting with their diet. Keto diet risks liver damage In a Korean study from 2005 it was also said that a keto diet can give you liver damage, pancreatitis and electrolyte imbalances. There is also a possibility for getting osteopenia, kidney stones and cardiac problems after following a low carb Continue reading >>

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