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Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Source Ketosis is the name for a state achieved on a low-carbohydrate diet. According to WebMD, when you are in ketosis, it means your body is burning fat for energy. When that happens, your body releases ketones into your bloodstream, and you are in ketosis. This state may cause a host of temporary symptoms. Understanding the Symptoms Many dieters develop symptoms that let them know ketones are present. For many people beginning a low-carb diet, ketosis kicks in after a few days of strict adherence to the diet. In fact, many low-carbohydrate plans, such as Atkins and paleo, have an initial phase in which dieters take in extremely low amounts of carbohydrates (usually less than 25 grams per day) to kick start ketosis. You can test for ketones in the urine using ketosis strips, or rely on symptoms to tell you ketosis has been achieved. Early Stages Symptoms of ketosis vary, depending how long you've been in the state. In the early stages, the symptoms may be a bit unpleasant. However, as your body adapts to ketones in the bloodstream, symptoms may decrease. Early symptoms usually last for several days or up to a week in some people. This period of symptoms is sometimes called the keto flu. It may continue until your body is used to burning fat instead of glucose. Afterwards, the levels of ketones should lessen, but that doesn't mean you aren't losing weight. It means your body has found a balance and is no longer producing excess ketones. According to Diet Doctor, early stage symptoms include: Flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache Nausea Brain fog Constipation Leg cramps Feeling unusually thirsty Irritability Heart palpitations Dry mouth Ketosis breath, which smells fruity and unpleasant Decreased energy and weakness Dizziness Sleep problems Cold hands and feet Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

Have you just started a low-carb diet? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted and overcome by tiredness? Perhaps you are thinking that going low-carb wasn’t a good idea after all… You might already know that these symptoms are not uncommon, especially if you are doing low-carb for the first time. Also known as “low carb flu” or “Atkins flu”, this phase is completely normal – although by no means pleasant. This condition occurs when you cut your carb intake sharply, to about 20-30g a day, in order to induce ketosis. What is low-carb flu? Your body is used to running on carbs. It’s been operating this way for decades. Cutting carbs in favour of fat is a huge change for your metabolism. Your body needs some time to adjust to this change. This period of adjustment can sometimes cause flu-like symptoms. Fatigue is the most common one, but you could also get muscle cramps, headaches, dizziness and mental fog. Some of these symptoms are markers of sugar withdrawal. Sugar addiction is real and common, so trying to break away can be difficult. Low-carb flu is not actual flu Please note that “low carb flu” does not include fever or respiratory cold-like symptoms such as coughing or sneezing. If you are experiencing any of these, it means that you might have actually caught an infection! So it would be a good idea to postpone starting your diet until you are all clear. How can you fight tiredness and other symptoms of low-carb flu? First of all, remember that it won’t last forever. Low-carb flu usually lasts around 3-5 days (although could be 1-2 weeks for some unlucky people with high metabolic resistance). Here are some simple tips on making this transition easier. 1) Eat more fat Fat is the key to this whole issue. You must eat lots of it – a lot more th Continue reading >>

Cheating And Consequences

Cheating And Consequences

Cheating. It’s no good. Every day I read confessions of cheating and I get messages from people who have “fallen off” the wagon. As my good friend Katrina says, “You didn’t fall. You jumped.” It’s unlikely you waded in and more likely you jumped head first. I hear the argument, “If you don’t allow yourself a cheat now and then that is a set up for failure.” I beg to differ. An intentional failure (allowing a cheat day/meal) is still failure (you don’t get to pretend it’s something else, just because you planned it). For the carb/sugar addicted, cheating is a slippery slope. It’s especially slippery if you suffer no consequences the first time you do it. That just gives you a level of overconfidence to think, “Hey this cheating thing isn’t so bad.” Until it is. Until you find yourself three weeks down the road and ten or more pounds heavier and bloated because, at some point, you went in to carb fog and mindlessly started eating every carb in sight because your cells immediately remembered the sugar rush and wanted more, more, and more. Every time you go off keto, you kick yourself out of ketosis and delay your fat adaption. Don’t delay your success. Don’t fool yourself into thinking “One cheat won’t hurt.” Yes, it will hurt. The hurt may not be the first time, but if you’re lucky, it will be. Some people learn their lesson the first time because they experience physical repercussions. Others don’t and they are the ones most in danger because they go off plan and “nothing happens” and so they deceive themselves in to thinking they can be “normal.” They may get away with it for a little while but eventually they will be right back where they started. And starting over sucks. Keto is not a “diet” in the traditional Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. First, it's necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven't eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn't happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to "adapt" to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the "low-carb flu" or "keto flu." In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead of carbs. It can take some time for your body to adapt to this. In the beginning of ketosis, you may experience a range of negative symptoms. They are often referred to as "low-carb flu" or "keto flu" because they resemble symptom Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Ketosis:

Symptoms Of Ketosis:

If you are considering the ketogenic diet or have already started down this carb-free road, you may wonder what you can expect. Here’s the thing. Ketosis looks different for everyone, but I will share many of the most common symptoms with you today. If something other than what’s listed here is happening to you, just do a quick Google search for that symptom and keto. You should be able to find what you’re looking for! The Early Signs: The early signs of ketosis vary from person to person. The biggest impact on how quickly you notice the symptoms of ketosis will have a lot to do with how you ate before you started the diet. If your diet was very high carb, you might get hit pretty quickly and furiously with what we like to call the “Keto Flu.” This can last anywhere from 3 days to a week or more. Once your body has adapted to burning ketones for energy instead of glucose, you’ll be golden so don’t give up! Here’s what you can expect within the first 2-3 days of starting the Ketogenic Diet: Fatigue & Weakness (lack of concentration) Headaches Metallic taste or sweet taste in your mouth (I experienced this, and it tasted like blood in my mouth) Lightheaded / Dizzy upon standing Heightened Thirst Hunger / Sweet or Carb Cravings Dry Mouth possibly paired with “Keto Breath.” Stomach Discomfort / Mild Nausea / Cramping Trouble Sleeping or Staying Asleep (early waking) Water weight loss (perhaps an excessive loss of weight within the first two weeks) Frequent Urination Allergies or cold like symptoms may flair up For the ladies: Period issues: You may experience a longer, shorter, earlier, later period because of Keto. Seriously it causes all of that. Each woman is different, and I have experienced every one of those issues with my period since starting ket Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets And Pain

Ketogenic Diets And Pain

Go to: Introduction Pain is one of the most commonly indicated health-related factors leading to poor quality of life.1-3 Not surprisingly, persons suffering from pain are more likely to also suffer from anxiety or depression compared to the normal population.2, 3 Pain can be difficult to assess and treat, and it often requires long-term management with a variety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Here we review correlative and direct evidence that ketogenic diets could offer a non-pharmacological option for reducing pain and inflammation. High-fat ketogenic diets have long been known to be effective against seizures,4, 5 and metabolically the high fat, very low carbohydrate and restricted protein content limits available glucose and forces utilization of ketones for cell energy. Similar to epilepsy, pain is a condition that encompasses diverse underlying conditions. Why would one propose that ketogenic diets might also be useful in treating pain, a seemingly disparate condition? There are several lines of evidence, outlined below, that strongly suggest that metabolic approaches to pain could provide new clinical opportunities. Some of these mechanisms have been tested directly and additional research is ongoing. Go to: Ketogenic Diet, Pain and Inflammation: Postulated Mechanisms Multiple hypotheses undergird postulated hypoalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of a ketogenic diet. Here we highlight four main postulated mechanisms: Anticonvulsant drugs are often prescribed for neuropathic pain, which is poorly responsive to typical analgesic drugs (see below). Logically, then, if there is any commonality in the actions of anticonvulsant drugs and the ketogenic diet, the latter should have some effect on neuropathic pain. Reducing glycolytic metabolis Continue reading >>

Keto Os Review

Keto Os Review

Created by Prüvit, Keto OS, which stands for Ketone Operating System, is a “revolutionary drink mix based on a proprietary ketone energy technology. It delivers advanced macro nutritionals and promotes optimized cellular regeneration, energy and longevity.” [1] Also known as the keto diet, KETO OS is a line of supplements that promise to turbocharge your metabolism and send your body into ketosis without resorting to the draconian no-carb, all-fat diet. The History of Ketones Known for centuries, it wasn’t until a hundred years ago that ketones (Beta-hydroxybutyrate) were used to treat seizures in kids with epilepsy. A “neuroprotective effect” was produced, which calms the nervous system. Soon researchers were exploring an expanded use of ketones to help with mental, emotional and cognitive health, according to Prüvit spokesperson Andra “Dr. Andy” Campitelli , a naturopathic doctor. She says ketone use was expanded as a tool to enhance athletic performance. Ketones result when the body burns fat for fuel. [2] Prüvit on Better Business Bureau There are two Prüvit profiles on the Better Business Bureau site, one in Indiana and one in Texas. Both sell Prüvit products, but have no website link. The Texas profile has an F rating, mostly for lack of response to customer complaints about return issues. The Indiana profile has an A rating, but no reviews or complaints, and it’s only been open a year. Neither profile lists the CEO the same as the website. There is no phone contact on either the Prüvit website or the Texas BBB profile, only an “Ask a Question” form that goes via email. The Indiana profile does have a phone number: (812) 631-4282. [3] [4] [5] What Keto OS Does? So Prüvit claims Keto OS supplementation helps shed fat, build a better body Continue reading >>

My Thoughts On Exogenous Ketones

My Thoughts On Exogenous Ketones

Should you supplement with exogenous ketones? What are the benefits? Which product is best? Are there people that shouldn’t use exogenous ketones? There is so much health information out there that when you want to determine whether or not something is good for you it can be challenging to know what’s what. Magic pills, super supplements and promises to a better life are yours for three payments of two hundred dollars. I do not wish to add to the aggravation, which is why I never endorsed exogenous ketones. Then, my mind was changed by many of you. Now, I can say that I’ve personally experimented with this ketogenic supplement and see that it can be helpful for some ketogenic people. Not sure what exogenous ketones are? Basically, they’re a supplement that deepens your state of ketosis by providing supplemental ketones. They can be especially helpful for kicking keto flu and assisting your body in becoming adapted. If you decide to supplement with exogenous ketones, my personal choice is Perfect Keto exogenous ketones. Why Perfect Keto? Well, to start, they are offering us an exclusive 15% off your first order of their exogenous ketones with the coupon code HEALTHFUL. So there’s something. BENEFITS TO EXOGENOUS KETONE SUPPLEMENTATION After personally trying Perfect Keto’s exogenous ketones, I see how they could be extremely useful for those dealing with things like: the keto flu, various conditions preventing certain people from going ketosis (fibromyalgia, thyroid, etc.), needing ketones for therapeutic purposes (for epilepsy, cancer, etc.), beginners on keto trying to get into ketosis for the first time, and those who need to extend a fast for medical reasons. What exogenous ketones are NOT is an absolute fix-everything supplement because not everyone need Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

Your Brain On Ketones

Your Brain On Ketones

The modern prescription of high carbohydrate, low fat diets and eating snacks between meals has coincided with an increase in obesity, diabetes, and and increase in the incidence of many mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. In addition, many of these disorders are striking the population at younger ages. While most people would agree that diet has a lot to do with the development of obesity and diabetes, many would disagree that what we eat has much to do with our mental health and outlook. I believe that what we eat has a lot to do with the health of our brains, though of course mental illness (like physical illness) has multifactorial causes, and by no means should we diminish the importance of addressing all the causes in each individual. But let's examine the opposite of the modern high carbohydrate, low fat, constant snacking lifestyle and how that might affect the brain. The opposite of a low fat, snacking lifestyle would be the lifestyle our ancestors lived for tens of thousands of generations, the lifestyle for which our brains are primarily evolved. It seems reasonable that we would have had extended periods without food, either because there was none available, or we were busy doing something else. Then we would follow that period with a filling meal of gathered plant and animal products, preferentially selecting the fat. During the day we might have eaten a piece of fruit, or greens, or a grub we dug up, but anything filling or high in calories (such as a starchy tuber) would have to be killed, butchered, and/or carefully prepared before eating. Fortunately, we have a terrific system of fuel for periods of fasting or low carbohydrate eating, our body (and brain) can readily shift from burning glucose to burning what ar Continue reading >>

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Four years ago, I realized that I’d been duped. I’d been lied to about carbohydrates. Despite obtaining a graduate degree with advanced courses in human nutrition, biochemistry, microbiology, and exercise physiology, a sports nutritionist certification, and plenty of time with my face stuffed in dietary research journals, I was simply doing things completely back-asswards when it came to fueling my body. See, my physical performance on my “gold-standard” 50-60% carbohydrate intake was just fine. Performance wasn’t an issue. I was quite competitive and very fast in my triathlons, runs, swims, bike rides, and workouts. But I also had bloating. Gas. Fermentation. Wildly fluctuating energy levels. Extra bits of fat around my belly and hips. Inflammation. All the warning signs of high blood glucose. All the signs that I was sacrificing health and longevity for performance…all the issues I talk about in gory detail in my book Beyond Training. So I simply gave a finger to dyed-in-the-wool, orthodox sports nutrition advice that trickles down from companies like Gatorade, Powerbar, and the US Government’s Food Pyramid. I took a deep, deep dive into a more ancestral, natural form of eating. I started eating more greens. More vegetables. More nutrient-dense plants. And I combined those plants with oodles of healthy, natural fats like avocadoes, olive oil, coconut milk, seeds, nuts, fatty fish, grass-fed meats, and yes, even “weird” foods like bone broth, liver, sardines and many of these unorthodox meals and pantry foods. I began eating the “cyclic” low-carbohydrate diet that I outline in my book on low carbohydrate eating for athletes, meaning that I would save the majority of my carbohydrate intake for the very end of the day, and even then, I ate the clean Continue reading >>

More On Ketogenic Diets

More On Ketogenic Diets

"All these molecular changes suggest that a ketogenic diet is protective against brain injury. Remarkably, a long-term ketogenic diet does not seem to be associated with significant side effects..." From Shelly Fan's October 1, 2013 article published in our nation's oldest science-related publication, Scientific American (The Fat-Fueled Brain: Unnatural or Advantageous?) "I am concerned that the federal government, the media, the processed food manufacturers and billion dollar drug and biotech companies have commandeered our food supply and health care systems. Routinely, information and evidence about what truly constitutes healthy eating is altered or hidden from the public in order to advance financial or face saving agendas. And worse, people who aren't aware of the deceptions are being injured and dying because they follow this agenda driven advice. Since the privately owned Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetics Association) receives great sums of money from processed food manufacturers, they can't just suddenly start saying that a high fat, low grain diet is healthiest - they would lose all their funding from companies like Kraft Foods, Hershey's and Coca-Cola." From Ellen Davis' (Master's in Applied Clinical Nutrition) website, Ketogenic Diet Resource. "I remember exactly where I was sitting in a clinic at Johns Hopkins in 2002 explaining to (admonishing, really) a patient who was on the Atkins diet how harmful it was because of DKA. I am so embarrassed by my complete stupidity and utter failure to pick up a single scientific article to fact check this dogma I was spewing to this poor patient. If you’re reading this, sir, please forgive me. You deserved a smarter doctor." From a blog post (Ketosis – Advantaged or Misunderstood St Continue reading >>

Keto Side Effects And How To Combat Them

Keto Side Effects And How To Combat Them

Nearly all diets will have some sort of positive effect on your body. You’ll go through some ups and downs but in the end, you’ll hopefully see a positive result that you’re happy with. The same goes for a ketogenic diet. This diet is going to help you shed a lot of unwanted fat and give you numerous other benefits that will help you later on in life if you decide to stick with this. However, just like every other diet, there are going to be some minor side effects. I only call them minor because your body will be going through a lot of changes and needs time to adjust. The side effects aren’t going to cause you any serious health problems either. They are only going to be somewhat temporary. Keto Side Effects The side effects of the keto diet are, of course, going to be unwanted, but some of them may not be avoidable. So, because of that, it’s better to be prepared and know what to expect than have the effects sneak up on you out of nowhere. Keto Flu The keto flu is something that is more than likely going to happen no matter what. This is going to happen during the initial weeks of starting the diet. The symptoms of the flu include ones that are very similar to that of normal flu symptoms. It’s important to understand that when you start to get the keto flu, it’s going to pass eventually. The flu is not going to stay with you for weeks upon weeks. At worst, it stays with you for a few days. You have to stay with the diet though. If you go off the diet at the first signs of the flu then try to go back to it when the symptoms go away, you are basically starting from scratch again. You will get the keto flu again. Don’t keep forcing yourself to start over. If you stay disciplined with the diet, the few days of suffering are worth a lifetime of health. If Continue reading >>

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

If you're looking for the trendiest diet since Paleo, this might be it—only with more fat, way less protein, and virtually zero carbs. The ketogenic diet, which has reportedly been used by celebs like Kim Kardashian and NBA player Lebron James, is a high-fat, low-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that was originally developed to treat epilepsy in children (experts can't say for sure why it reduces the frequency of seizures, but it does seem to work). The whole diet is based on a process called ketosis, which is when your body is so depleted of carbs that your liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies, which can be used as energy, says Tracy A. Siegfried, M.D., medical director at The N.E.W. Program, a bariatric and metabolic weight-loss center in California. The ketones replace carbohydrates as your body’s main energy source, meaning you are running on (and burning) fat. To tell if your body is in a state of ketosis, you can measure your blood or urine for elevated levels of ketones (Ketostix, used to test keto-dieters ketone levels, are available at many pharmacies). If this sounds familiar, it's probably because ketosis is also the goal of the first stage of the Atkins diet. But unlike the keto diet, the Atkins diet aims to get you into a mild state of ketosis and allows for more carbohydrates. In other words, keto is more hardcore. So What the Heck Do You Eat? To get your body to reach ketosis, 80 to 90 percent of the calories you consume should come from fat, and the rest should come from a combo of protein and carbs, says Siegfried. Plus, your carb intake is limited to 10 to 35 grams per day. That's roughly the amount in a single apple, glass of milk, or piece of bread. In fact, it's pretty much impossible to eat fruit or milk-based products without su Continue reading >>

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