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Should I Try Ketosis

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

“There are a lot of similarities between Paleolithic (Paleo) and ketogenic diets (KD), particularly when compared to the now discredited ‘Standard American’ low fat, high carbohydrate diet. As a result, people may reasonably assume that all low carb diets are pretty much equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth, and the resultant confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. The similarities between Paleo and keto cluster around what they exclude: all grains and grain products (refined and unrefined), peas and beans, and refined sugars. In addition, the paleo diet excludes all dairy (milk, cream, and cheese), whereas the ketogenic diet allows butter, full fat cream and natural cheeses. The differences between the Paleo diet and KD are many, including: Range of foods allowed Recommended amounts of protein Amounts and sources of carbohydrates allowed or recommended Type, quality, and quantity of science supporting diet safety and efficacy Most importantly, the source and consistency of fuel to supply brain energy needs – specifically the availability of ketones at adequate levels to replace glucose as the brain’s primary fuel” “This diagram points out the similarities between ketogenic and Paleo diets, especially when compared to the now discredited low fat diets of the past. But clearly the Paleo and well-formulated ketogenic diets nonetheless are different, with little overlap in their respective compositions. Thus the major metabolic difference between Paleo and KD is encompassed in the phrase ‘nutritional ketosis’. By definition, a ‘ketogenic diet’ allows your body to be in nutritional keto Continue reading >>

When Should You Try A Low Carb Diet?

When Should You Try A Low Carb Diet?

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her popular blog or visiting her on Facebook. And if you need one-on-one help with your diet, click here to learn more about her nutrition consulting services. Recently, I wrote an article about the potential pitfalls of following an excessively low carb diet, and the symptoms to watch out for to know if you’d benefit from adding carbs back into your diet. While I repeatedly pointed out that there are many people who thrive on a very low carb or ketogenic approach, there were commenters who staunchly disagreed with my recommendations. While I stand by my original article (as well as Chris’s subsequent supporting articles here and here), I wanted to make sure that those who would benefit from a very low carbohydrate or ketogenic diet were aware of the positive impact this nutritional approach can have when implemented correctly. Yes, you read that correctly: there are many people who can do incredibly well on a properly designed, nutritionally adequate ketogenic diet. Some people find that they thrive on a very low carb or ketogenic diet. Could you be one of them? In this article, I’ll describe seven different classes of people who could experience improved health and wellbeing by following a ketogenic diet, as well as briefly explain the precautions you’ll need to take if choosing to experiment with this therapeutic diet strategy. Overweight and Obesity One of the biggest draws of a low carbohydrate diet is that it can be a highly effective tool for rapid weight loss, especially in those who are significantly overweight and/or obese. When compared to low fat diets, Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

But he didn’t start dropping the pounds until a friend who had lost a lot of weight suggested he try a ketogenic diet. Gross switched to the high-fat, ultra-low-carb diet and lost 70 pounds in seven months. And he’s kept at it for five years. Though online searches about ketogenic diets started spiking last year, the diet was created in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy. When you’re on a keto diet and you’re in what’s called ketosis, a metabolic process forces the body to burn stored fat because there’s not enough glucose for energy. Fans of the keto diet say they have more energy and better focus. The diet, however, is restrictive and can be difficult to maintain. A group of local nutrition experts say the diet is safe, but they were split over whether they would recommend it for everyone. Burning fat How does the diet work? Our bodies break down carbohydrates when we eat. Those carbs are turned into glucose that fuels our cells, giving us energy. Eating keto A difficult start Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

When Trying To Get Into Ketosis (while On A Ketogenic Diet), Should You Count Carbs Or Net Carbs?

When Trying To Get Into Ketosis (while On A Ketogenic Diet), Should You Count Carbs Or Net Carbs?

If you want to get into ketosis quickly, count all carbs and keep that count extremely low (under 20 g. per day; fewer will help speed the process more). Keep protein levels at no more than 30% of your daily calories--excess protein will be converted into glucose by the liver, slowing or preventing ketosis. Eat lots of fat--saturated fat is fine, but I'd recommend coconut oil, butter, olive oil, avocado oil, fair trade palm oil--basically anything that people have been eating for thousands of years. (No canola oil or corn oil, for example.) Don't eat if you're not hungry, but when you do eat, eat fat, fat, protein, and just a little bit of carbs that you can't avoid. Do not eat any form of sugar or grain (flour, rice) or starch (potatoes, bread, plantains), including things like breading on fried foods or sauces. If you have access to artificial sweeteners, you can use those, but stay away from sugar alcohols at first--stick to sucralose or stevia at the beginning. If you just avoid sweets completely, you'll lose the taste for them over time. When you do eat more carbs, make them complex and natural, like non-root vegetables and salad. Don't forget to include the small amount of carbs in things like cheese, heavy cream, and eggs. Once you are in ketosis, you can switch to counting net carbs. You can use this system from the beginning, if you don't mind it taking longer to get into ketosis. Use the ketosis strips (google them) to tell when you're in ketosis, and check to make sure that what you're eating doesn't pull you out of ketosis. Why? Because every person is different. Some can eat a lot of carbs and remain in ketosis; others need to eat very few carbs to remain in ketosis. You'll need to figure out which where your personal limits are. Also, keep in mind that the Continue reading >>

I Tried The Keto Diet For A Week, And This Is What Happened

I Tried The Keto Diet For A Week, And This Is What Happened

Americans are always finding the “best” way to lose weight, hence the wide variety of diets we have available to us. There’s “raw-til-4,” Paleo, juice cleanses, the blood type diet, cabbage soup diet, and more. Now, another diet, or as people like to call it now, lifestyle, is emerging called keto, which is very comparable to the popular 1970’s Atkins diet. Keto requires you to severely limit your intake of carbs to 25 grams net carbs a day, have a moderate intake of protein, and a high intake of fats. This will set your body to run on ketones instead of glucose. There are so many pros and cons to this diet, and no one can seem to come to a definite conclusion, partly because it hasn’t been studied long enough. As a society, we go through waves of fearing a certain macro nutrient, to all of a sudden praising it. Keto could just be another phase, or maybe it actually provides the health benefits it claims to from simple weight loss to curing cancer. I decided to try it out myself for one week to see what would happen. My goal wasn’t to lose weight, or to reinforce the health claims. I just wanted to experience what it would be like, and what people go through when practicing keto. The Night Before I did my research, calculated my macros, and prepped some meals that I can have. The amount of eggs I have in my fridge right now is ridiculous. I also got avocados, Earth Balance vegan butter, low-carb vegetables, and cheese. My goal is to hit 25 grams carbs, 75 grams protein, and 137 grams fat. I love peanut butter, eggs and cheese for sure, but…yikes. I dragged my boyfriend to do it with me so I’d be encouraged to finish out the week. He was ecstatic for it, though, and kept talking about how much butter and steak he was going to eat. I joked about how I Continue reading >>

From Dr. Josh Axe, Dnm, Dc, Cns

From Dr. Josh Axe, Dnm, Dc, Cns

The ketogenic diet (or “keto,” for short) is a very low-carb diet that has been used by doctors since the 1920s to help their patients heal from diseases including epilepsy, high cholesterol, and, of course, obesity. In fact, research shows that the keto diet is one of the most effective dietary approaches for encouraging weight loss, in addition to preventing neurological disorders and normalizing blood sugar levels, thus offering protection against conditions like diabetes. Unlike most diets that focus on calorie restriction as a means of weight loss, the goal of the ketogenic diet is to cut off the body’s supply of glucose from carbohydrates. While low-carb diets like the Atkins Diet have been popular for many years, not everyone is able to achieve the results they’re looking for. As a result, some who have tried a moderate low-carb diet may find that transitioning to a the stricter keto diet can finally help them to reverse symptoms they’ve been dealing with for years, including stubborn weight loss or fatigue. But there is certainly no “one size fits all” dietary strategy that will work well for every person. To help you decide which type of low carb diet might be the best fit for you, here are five key differences between the keto diet and most other low-carb diets: 1. Only Keto Puts You into Ketosis Low carb diets and the ketogenic diet have similar positive affects on the body’s ability to burn stored body fat. However, only the keto diet will put you into a true state of “ketosis.” Ketosis is the metabolic state in which ketone bodies are used for fuel, rather than glucose—which is typically provided by high-sugar and high-carb foods, and is the body’s preferred source of energy. When the body relies on fat for energy, this fat comes fro Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Recently I had a client tell me that she and her husband were eating more than 2 pounds of bacon a week—usually three strips for breakfast and one or two with a salad for dinner. I’ve been a dietitian for almost 20 years. Few things surprise me. But I had to ask: “Why?” She told me that her husband had heard about a new diet on TV, the keto diet, and they decided to try it. Six months and countless packages of bacon later, her husband had lost 20 pounds and said he felt more energetic. I’m beginning to hear more and more people lecture me about the benefits of the ketogenic diet. “Keto burns fat fast! It turbo-charges your energy! It fights disease! You can eat all the bacon you want!” But as is so often the case with diets, underneath all the initial excitement, there’s a gut check. Here’s everything you should know about the ketogenic diet and whether or not you should try it for yourself. Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so your brain signals it to tap its reserve of ketones. It’s like a hybrid car that runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity. Okay, but what are ketones? They’re compounds created by your liver from your fat stores when blood insulin is low. “Your liver produces ketones all the time, but the rate depends on carbohydrate and protein intake,” says Jeff Volek, Ph.D., R.D., a professor of human sciences at Ohio State University. Eat a normal amount of carbs and protein, and ketogenesis idles. Cut carbs and protein back, and you push to half throttle. This takes about three days to induce. A ketogenic diet requires that fat comprise 60 to 80 percent of your total calo Continue reading >>

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

One of the reasons The Bulletproof Diet with Bulletproof Coffee works so well for people looking to lose weight is that Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting helps your body to more easily enter a state called cyclical ketosis, which is great for a whole bunch of reasons. Ketosis is a cornerstone of becoming Bulletproof; listen to these recent Bulletproof Radio episodes with ketosis experts Jimmy Moore and Dominic D’Agostino to get the scoop on how and why it works. It’s what happens when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar for energy, and it only happens when you eat almost no carbohydrates, or when you hack it using certain kinds of oils. Many people first stumble upon the idea of ketosis while looking for a weight loss strategy. That can be a major part of it for so many people out there who have tried just about every other diet out there but haven’t seen the results they’d hoped for. But when people experience the mental clarity and focus that ketosis brings, the game changes! This post walks you through one of the most important yet underrated mechanisms that makes ketosis so effective for people who have tried everything else to lose weight and failed to keep it off: appetite suppression. Ketosis works for weight loss in the short term, but that’s not why it’s so amazing. Short term weight loss is easy (I’ve lost at least 200 pounds of short term weight…because it always roared back on with a vengeance so I could lose it again!) When you look at keeping your weight off forever, ketosis provides a level of appetite suppression that is actually liberating. Ketosis helps you literally stop thinking about food all the time. Why Calorie Counting Is So Ineffective One of the reasons old-fashioned, calorie-restricted diets tend to fail is becau Continue reading >>

Everyone's Calling This Diet The New Paleo

Everyone's Calling This Diet The New Paleo

It's the low-carb, high-fat eating plan fitness fanatics swear by. But is it actually worth doing? A dietitian explains. The ketogenic diet has gained popularity in recent years, with some claiming this way of eating can have incredible benefits to long-term health. But what is a ketogenic diet, and does the evidence truly stack up to back up the claims? This is what you need to know, according to accredited practicing dietitian Chloe McLeod. What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a diet very low in carbohydrates and very high in fat. The reduction in the consumption of carbohydrates places the body in a state of ketosis, which is a metabolic state where fat provides most of the fuel the body requires to function. What constitutes a diet that’s low-carb and high-fat? A standard ketogenic diet is usually comprised of approximately 20 per cent protein, 75 per cent fat, and 5 per cent carbohydrates, where approximately 10-50g of carbohydrates are consumed each day. When compared to a general healthy diet, the distribution is far more even, with approximately 20-30 per cent protein, 20-30 per cent fat and 30-40 per cent carbohydrates. Who should do it? Ketogenic diets are reportedly useful for weight management. When reducing carbohydrates, it is normal to see the number on the scales go down, due to the body losing water as a result of carbohydrate stores being used up. Fat and protein are also very satiating, meaning that it is possible you will feel fuller. This means potentially fewer calories are consumed, so weight loss is as a result of reduced calorie consumption, rather than the low-carb diet. That said there is some research which indicates that low carbohydrate diets can assist with weight loss, particularly in severely obese individuals. The cons? Some Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And The Ketogenic Diet

Weight Loss And The Ketogenic Diet

It’s pretty obvious the well-known advice to “eat less, move more” for losing weight is not working for most people — if any. In fact, at least ⅔ of dieters who lose weight not only gain it back, but often do so with some extra weight. Yikes. So the question is, can there be a real solution to this problem? There just might be, and it’s a little-known process that more and more people are catching on to: ketosis for weight loss. Ketosis on a low-carb, ketogenic diet works because it helps suppress your appetite unlike other ways of eating. Not only that, it can also support increased focus and mental clarity. Imagine no longer obsessing about food or worrying about eating too much because your appetite is just… under control. No more counting calories! No more cravings. No more crazy amounts of exercise. Just satiety and a regulated appetite. Not only that, a ketogenic diet might even be able to help you lose weight faster than other methods — while keeping the weight off. If this idea appeals to you (and come on, how could it not?), you might be ready to try a ketogenic diet for weight loss. But you’re still left with some questions, so let’s cover all of the details you need to know to get started. Before you can use a ketogenic diet for weight loss, it’s a good idea to have an understanding of how it works. Here are some important points about the ketogenic diet: A ketogenic diet is centered around bringing the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis is metabolic process in which the body burns fat for energy instead of its primary fuel, carbohydrates. When you drastically cut down on the amount of carbohydrates or calories you’re eating, and there aren’t enough carbohydrates from food to burn for energy, the body switches to the state of keto Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? : Should You Try It?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? : Should You Try It?

The popularity of ketogenic diet has been on the rise lately and for good reason. There is lots of new research about the negative metabolic effects of carbohydrates and the potentially protective benefits of a higher fat diet to prevent heart disease, cancer, and aid in weight loss. Even Dr Mercola is onboard and has just released a new best selling book called Fat for Fuel The ketogenic diet eliminates carbohydrates entirely or is allowed in only in very small amounts. The main macronutrient is dietary fat, usually 70-75% of total daily calories. The rest is broken down into 20% protein and 5% carbohydrates. A typical breakfast might be an egg over a bed of leafy greens with three tablespoons olive oil, ½ avocado and ¼ cup blueberries. Lunch might be an arugula salad with almond slivers, roasted salmon, olive oil and avocado. Choosing high quality fats is the healthiest way to approach ketosis through choices like avocado, unrefined coconut or MCT oil, chia or flax seeds and grass-fed dairy products. There is strong evidence to support that switching to a ketogenic diet can result in weight loss. No calorie counting required. In one study, individuals on a ketogenic diet lost 2.2 times more weight than their cohorts on a low-fat, low-fat diet. Their cholesterol profile also improved with a reduction in triglycerides and HDL levels. Switching your metabolism from carbohydrate-dependent to fat-dependent can result in weight loss, lasting stamina with increased energy. The energy we receive from carbohydrates is short-lived with stores lasting only about 24 hours. When we eat a cookie or piece of bread, insulin (fat storage hormone) rises, leading to our storing any excess sugars we can’t use right away as fat. Eating less carbs automatically decreases the amount of Continue reading >>

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