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Sepsis Metabolic Acidosis Anion Gap

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

[full Text] Can Base Excess And Anion Gap Predict Lactate Level In Diagnosis Of Se | Oaem

Editor who approved publication: Dr Hans-Christoph Pape Werapon Pongmanee,1 Veerapong Vattanavanit2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand Background: Lactate measurement is the key component in septic shock identification and resuscitation. However, point-of-care lactate testing is not widely used due to the lack of access to nearby test equipment. Biomarkers such as serum lactate, anion gap (AG), and base excess (BE) are used in determining shock in patients with seemingly normal vital signs. Purpose: We aimed to determine if these biomarkers can be used interchangeably in patients with septic shock in the emergency setting. Patients and methods: A prospective observational cohort study was undertaken at a tertiary hospital in southern Thailand. Baseline point-of-care BE, AG, and serum lactate were recorded in all patients presenting with septic shock at the emergency department. Overall correlations including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) for both BE and AG to predict serum lactate level were calculated. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. One of our CDI noted an elevated lactic acid and queried the physician for a diagnosis. The patient did not have Sepsis. Our physician advisor said not to do that because the next lactic acid was normal. She said we should also be looking for the underlying cause of the lactic acidosis and not querying for the diagnosis. A diagnosis of lactic acidosis will give us a CC. Other CDI's have said that if the elevated lactic acid was treated, monitored or evaluated we should be querying for the diagnosis. Does anyone have any direction on how this should be handled?
    Is lactic acidosis always inherent in other conditions and that's what we should focus on?
    What can we pick up the diagnosis by itself as a CC / when should we query to get to documented in the chart?
    Are there any other clinical parameters we should be looking at when evaluating whether we should query such as the anion gap?
    Is there a specific treatment for metabolic acidosis?
    Thank you,
    Christine Butka RN MSN
    CDI Lead
    CentraState Medical Center
    Freehold, NJ

  2. What a timely comment. Recently, our coding auditor suggested that we should always keep an eye out for the cc "acidosis". It seems to me that lactic acidosis could be inherent to the disease process of sepsis and therefore should not be captured. Any thoughts?
    Yvonne B RN CDI Salinas, CA.

  3. Hello all! I agree, I believe lactic acidosis is inherent to sepsis. It is one of the most important indicators that gives the clnician a clue that sepsis may be present. Our fluid administration policy was actually developed on the lactic acid result: the higher the number, the more fluid we bolused (in non-CHF patients, of course). In cases were Sepsis is determined not to be present, we will query the provider, providing they treated or monitored the acidosis in some manner
    Shiloh

  4. -> Continue reading
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Remember increased Anion gap causes in an easier way than MUDPILES! "Ur LADy PISes ME". Try it! Good luck, study well!

Increased Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis As A Result Of 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic Acid): A Role For Acetaminophen

Increased Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis as a Result of 5-Oxoproline (Pyroglutamic Acid): A Role for Acetaminophen *Department of Internal Medicine; Metabolic Disease Center, BRI Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas Dr. Andrew Z. Fenves, Nephrology Division, Baylor University Medical Center, 3500 Gaston, Dallas, TX 75246. Phone: 214-820-2350; Fax: 214-820-7367; E-mail: fenvesa{at}dneph.com The endogenous organic acid metabolic acidoses that occur commonly in adults include lactic acidosis; ketoacidosis; acidosis that results from the ingestion of toxic substances such as methanol, ethylene glycol, or paraldehyde; and a component of the acidosis of kidney failure. Another rare but underdiagnosed cause of severe, high anion gap metabolic acidosis in adults is that due to accumulation of 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid). Reported are four patients with this syndrome, and reviewed are 18 adult patients who were reported previously in the literature. Twenty-one patients had major exposure to acetaminophen (one only acute exposure). Eighteen (82%) of the 22 patients were women. Most of the patients were malnourished as a result of multiple medical comorbidities, and most had so Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. One of our CDI noted an elevated lactic acid and queried the physician for a diagnosis. The patient did not have Sepsis. Our physician advisor said not to do that because the next lactic acid was normal. She said we should also be looking for the underlying cause of the lactic acidosis and not querying for the diagnosis. A diagnosis of lactic acidosis will give us a CC. Other CDI's have said that if the elevated lactic acid was treated, monitored or evaluated we should be querying for the diagnosis. Does anyone have any direction on how this should be handled?
    Is lactic acidosis always inherent in other conditions and that's what we should focus on?
    What can we pick up the diagnosis by itself as a CC / when should we query to get to documented in the chart?
    Are there any other clinical parameters we should be looking at when evaluating whether we should query such as the anion gap?
    Is there a specific treatment for metabolic acidosis?
    Thank you,
    Christine Butka RN MSN
    CDI Lead
    CentraState Medical Center
    Freehold, NJ

  2. What a timely comment. Recently, our coding auditor suggested that we should always keep an eye out for the cc "acidosis". It seems to me that lactic acidosis could be inherent to the disease process of sepsis and therefore should not be captured. Any thoughts?
    Yvonne B RN CDI Salinas, CA.

  3. Hello all! I agree, I believe lactic acidosis is inherent to sepsis. It is one of the most important indicators that gives the clnician a clue that sepsis may be present. Our fluid administration policy was actually developed on the lactic acid result: the higher the number, the more fluid we bolused (in non-CHF patients, of course). In cases were Sepsis is determined not to be present, we will query the provider, providing they treated or monitored the acidosis in some manner
    Shiloh

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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G382(p)mind The Gap! Elevated Anions Secondary To Paracetamol And Sepsis | Archives Of Disease In Childhood

G382(P) Mind the gap! elevated anions secondary to paracetamol and sepsis British Paediatric Respiratory Society and Association for Paediatric Palliative Medicine and Paediatric Intensive Care Medicine G382(P) Mind the gap! elevated anions secondary to paracetamol and sepsis 1Metabolic Medicine, Sheffield Childrens Hospital, Sheffield, UK 2Paediatric Intensive Care, Sheffield Childrens Hospital, Sheffield, UK 3Clinical Chemistry, Sheffield Childrens Hospital, Sheffield, UK Aim Metabolic acidosis is a common finding in children presenting with sepsis. Hypovolaemia and hypoxia are the common causes for this derangement but sometimes there are other culprits. We aim to highlight the significance of correlating the anion gap with the biochemical picture and, when there are discrepancies, look for alterative diagnoses. An unusual case of transient pyroglutamic aciduria, presenting during an episode of severe sepsis and paracetamol use, will be used to outline the importance of examining the anion gap. Methods We illustrate the case of a 15 month old girl who presented with an 11 day history of diarrhoea and vomiting. She presented to the emergency department in a state of decreased co Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. One of our CDI noted an elevated lactic acid and queried the physician for a diagnosis. The patient did not have Sepsis. Our physician advisor said not to do that because the next lactic acid was normal. She said we should also be looking for the underlying cause of the lactic acidosis and not querying for the diagnosis. A diagnosis of lactic acidosis will give us a CC. Other CDI's have said that if the elevated lactic acid was treated, monitored or evaluated we should be querying for the diagnosis. Does anyone have any direction on how this should be handled?
    Is lactic acidosis always inherent in other conditions and that's what we should focus on?
    What can we pick up the diagnosis by itself as a CC / when should we query to get to documented in the chart?
    Are there any other clinical parameters we should be looking at when evaluating whether we should query such as the anion gap?
    Is there a specific treatment for metabolic acidosis?
    Thank you,
    Christine Butka RN MSN
    CDI Lead
    CentraState Medical Center
    Freehold, NJ

  2. What a timely comment. Recently, our coding auditor suggested that we should always keep an eye out for the cc "acidosis". It seems to me that lactic acidosis could be inherent to the disease process of sepsis and therefore should not be captured. Any thoughts?
    Yvonne B RN CDI Salinas, CA.

  3. Hello all! I agree, I believe lactic acidosis is inherent to sepsis. It is one of the most important indicators that gives the clnician a clue that sepsis may be present. Our fluid administration policy was actually developed on the lactic acid result: the higher the number, the more fluid we bolused (in non-CHF patients, of course). In cases were Sepsis is determined not to be present, we will query the provider, providing they treated or monitored the acidosis in some manner
    Shiloh

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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