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Ruminal Acidosis In Goats

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I always get asked how much grain should I feed my horse. It Depends. Horses age, needs, teeth, health, weight, how the horse is kept, how hard the horse is worked and other things. Sweet feed is not food, it is cheap for a reason, it is junk and sugar not much nutritional value. Read This article about the Horse's Gut and digestion: http://www.thinklikeahorse.org/index-... I have more on this topic on my this page: http://www.thinklikeahorse.org/index-...

Grain Overload, Acidosis, Or Grain Poisoning In Stock

What is grain overload? Grain overload (acidosis, grain poisoning) occurs when cattle, sheep or goats eat large amounts of grain. The grain releases carbohydrate into the animal's rumen and this rapidly ferments rather than being digested normally. Bacteria in the rumen produce lactic acid, resulting in acidosis, slowing of the gut, dehydration and often death. What causes grain overload? Wheat and barley are the most common causes of grain overload, but it occasionally occurs with oats and lupins. Crushing or cracking of grain by a hammermill increases the likelihood of grain overload, because these processes result in quicker release of carbohydrates. Cases are often seen when: stock are suddenly grain fed without being gradually introduced to the grain or pellets there is a sudden change in feeding regimen or in the grains being fed stock graze newly harvested paddocks (where there may be spilled grain or unharvested areas) stock get unplanned access to grain or pellets, such as around silos. Which classes of stock are affected? Cattle sheep and goats of any age can be affected if they eat more grain than they can digest normally. Signs of grain overload: depressed appearance ly Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Subodh Kumar

    Dear Usman,
    Have you considered that in nature goats were always self fed only on green leaves.So it would seem you can try increasing the green leaf fodder to start with. Next you may like to recall that good drinking water for goats used to be from clean streams. Now such good clean drinking water is rare even for humans. Good clean mineral rich sweet drinking water slightly alkaline . Its pH can go up to 8.5..
    In my humble opinion try improving these instead of treating with medicines.

  2. Dr.Tadimeti Hanumanta

    I fully agree with Dr.Subodh, however the question by Dr.Usman is the treatment of already affected goats.
    This is rampant even in the indian conditions, when goats are reared in urban places.
    The treatment is to feed Sodium Bicarbonate, around 25 gm saturated in 1/2 litre of water.
    Hope this works for you Dr.Usman

  3. Subodh Kumar

    Sodium bicarbonate - a good suggestion. But take care of water. Make it alkaline if possible.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Sub-acute Ruminal Acidosis (sara) In Dairy Cows

414 T. Mutsvangwa - Research Associate/University of Guelph; T. Wright - Acting Dairy Cattle Nutritionist/OMAFRA Table of Contents Introduction Sub-acute ruminal acidosis (SARA), also known as chronic or sub-clinical acidosis, is a well-recognized digestive disorder that is an increasing health problem in most dairy herds. Results from field studies indicate a high prevalence of SARA in high-producing dairy herds as producers respond to the demands for increased milk production with higher grain, lower fibre diets that maximize energy intake during early lactation. Dairy herds experiencing SARA will have a decreased efficiency of milk production, impaired cow health and high rates of involuntary culling. The economic cost associated with SARA can be staggering. It is estimated that SARA costs the North American dairy industry between $500 million and $1 billion (U.S.) annually, with the costs per affected cow estimated at $1.12 (U.S.) per day. The challenge for dairy farmers and dairy nutritionists is to implement feeding management and husbandry practices that prevent or reduce the incidence of SARA, even in high-producing dairy herds where higher levels of concentrate are fed to Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Subodh Kumar

    Dear Usman,
    Have you considered that in nature goats were always self fed only on green leaves.So it would seem you can try increasing the green leaf fodder to start with. Next you may like to recall that good drinking water for goats used to be from clean streams. Now such good clean drinking water is rare even for humans. Good clean mineral rich sweet drinking water slightly alkaline . Its pH can go up to 8.5..
    In my humble opinion try improving these instead of treating with medicines.

  2. Dr.Tadimeti Hanumanta

    I fully agree with Dr.Subodh, however the question by Dr.Usman is the treatment of already affected goats.
    This is rampant even in the indian conditions, when goats are reared in urban places.
    The treatment is to feed Sodium Bicarbonate, around 25 gm saturated in 1/2 litre of water.
    Hope this works for you Dr.Usman

  3. Subodh Kumar

    Sodium bicarbonate - a good suggestion. But take care of water. Make it alkaline if possible.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Acidosis

Acidosis is also known as toxic indigestion. It occurs when a high proportion of concentrate (carbohydrates) is fed in the ration, either acutely or chronically. Signs: Signs may include depression, lack of appetite, bloat, lack of rumination, staggering, diarrhea or lack of manure, muscle twitching, and teeth grinding. Severe rumen acidosis can be accompanied by systemic and often fatal acidosis. Respiratory distress, shock, cardiovascular collapse, coma, seizures and death occur in severe cases. Treatment: Administer 2 to 3 ounces of sodium bicarbonate by mouth, which will help neutralize acid in the rumen. Magnesium hydroxide or magnesium oxide can also be used to neutralize rumen acid. Encourage consumption of long-stemmed grass hay and water. Many animals with acidosis will require IV fluids to survive. Antibiotics will help prevent secondary bacterial overgrowth with undesirable organisms. Thiamin treatment is recommended because polioencephalomalacia is a potential sequela. Anti-inflammatories will help prevent toxicity and founder. Probiotics should be administered to replace the beneficial rumen organisms that have been killed due to low rumen pH. If a goat is showing clin Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Subodh Kumar

    Dear Usman,
    Have you considered that in nature goats were always self fed only on green leaves.So it would seem you can try increasing the green leaf fodder to start with. Next you may like to recall that good drinking water for goats used to be from clean streams. Now such good clean drinking water is rare even for humans. Good clean mineral rich sweet drinking water slightly alkaline . Its pH can go up to 8.5..
    In my humble opinion try improving these instead of treating with medicines.

  2. Dr.Tadimeti Hanumanta

    I fully agree with Dr.Subodh, however the question by Dr.Usman is the treatment of already affected goats.
    This is rampant even in the indian conditions, when goats are reared in urban places.
    The treatment is to feed Sodium Bicarbonate, around 25 gm saturated in 1/2 litre of water.
    Hope this works for you Dr.Usman

  3. Subodh Kumar

    Sodium bicarbonate - a good suggestion. But take care of water. Make it alkaline if possible.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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