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Reversing Physiological Insulin Resistance

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THE KETOGENIC EDGE COOKBOOK: A Training Manual for Low-Carb, Ketogenic, and Paleo Cuisine - http://www.primaledgehealth.com/produ... free Maca EBOOK: http://www.primaledgehealth.com/prima... For coaching, skype consultations: http://www.primaledgehealth.com/coach... The length which one may wish to maintain ketosis will differ for everyone - here I present some thoughts on how some people may wish to approach the ketogenic diet depending on their goals, past history, and preferences.

Does Long Term Ketosis Cause Insulin Resistance?

“It’s a snake.” “It’s a wall.” “It’s a rope.” “It’s a fan.” “It’s a tree.” “It’s insulin resistance.” I’ve always been fascinated by those describing a “new finding” in medicine. I am reminded of the story of 5 men who, never having seen an elephant before, were blindfolded and asked to describe what he discovered. However, each man was introduced to a different part of the elephant. Each of them had a dramatically different description of the elephant and each made a conclusion that was very different from the others. What is fascinating, is that we usually make our “blindfolded comparisons” to those things we have seen or about which we have some descriptive understanding. Observing and describing human physiology is much like examining an elephant while blindfolded for the first time. This week’s “blind-folded finding” is what has been interpreted by some as “insulin resistance” made worse by a ketogenic diet. Really? This perked my curiosity, because I’ve personally been following a low-carbohydrate/ketogenic diet for 10 years and have thousands of patients doing the same. To this day, I’ve never seen insulin resistanc Continue reading >>

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  1. hunterxgreen

    I have no interest in being Keto any longer so how long does it take to reverse the physiological insulin resistance?

  2. Dynoman

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sAqy1lnWXo

  3. simsalabimbam

    A couple of days.

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What is INSULIN RESISTANCE? What does INSULIN RESISTANCE mean? INSULIN RESISTANCE meaning - INSULIN RESISTANCE definition - INSULIN RESISTANCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults. Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose. Insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin action; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance may also develop in patients who have recently experienced abdominal or bariatric procedures. This acute form of insulin resistance that may result post-operatively tends to increase over the short-term with sensitivity to insulin typically returning to patients after about five days.

Physiological Insulin Resistance

I’ve been meaning to do a deep dive into physiological insulin resistance for quite a while now, but the universe keeps conspiring to take my time. Because I haven’t had time to read, learn more and write about it, I thought I’d share the links I have accumulated thus far. Mostly because I’ve now been asked a variant of the following multiple times, or have seen the following posted on various forums for discussing nutrition, health, and low carbohydrate diets: “Why has my blood glucose gone up on a low carb diet?” Typically this is accompanied by a good deal of anxiety and fretting over glucometers. I should know, I watched my blood glucose increase by a few points as I’ve sustained my low carb diet. My understanding is that this is a known adaptation completely unrelated to the insulin resistance concomitant with diabetes. While I’m not the person you should ask about anything health related, I’ve wanted an answer to this question myself. The explanation I’ve read is that after going low carb, your muscle tissue becomes insulin resistant in order to preserve serum glucose availability for the brain. If your muscle tissue did not do this, reduced availability o Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. hunterxgreen

    I have no interest in being Keto any longer so how long does it take to reverse the physiological insulin resistance?

  2. Dynoman

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sAqy1lnWXo

  3. simsalabimbam

    A couple of days.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d... Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O6rsdo The carb cycling diet is one of my favorite diets because it is one of the fastest way to burn fat while retaining as much muscle as possible. Most people don't know that carb cycling is actually a form of ketogenic dieting. The ketogenic diet is a diet that is lower in carbohydrates, which makes our body convert more dietary fat and body fat in to keytones in the liver. Which it then goes on to use for energy. Like I've said in many of my videos the human body prefers to use carbs as its primary source of energy. You're body won't produce too many keytones on a high carbohydrate diet, because your body won't need extra energy from fat due to the fact that its getting its energy from the more preferred carbohydrates. The only way for our body to use more fat for energy is by not having its preferred source there all the time. Eliminating carbs completely, however can have many drawbacks on our health and well being. Protein, carbs, and fats are all important and necessary for our body. So in comes the cyclical ketogenic diet aka carb cycling and also known originally as the anabolic Diet. There are many different approaches to carb cycling, but the general idea is that At some points of the week you're going to have a high amount of carbohydrates, and at other points of the week you're going to have a low amount of carbohydrates. Setting up the high carb and low carb splits will vary from one plan to the next. Some people may have very small changes in the amount of carbs they have from day to day. An example of this would be to set up a low carb, medium carb, and high carb day. Let's say 300 grams of carbs on high carb, 250 grams of carbs on your medium carb, and 200 grams of carbs on your no carb day. Another more advanced approach would be to do a High carb, low carb, and no carb day. The way that I like to set this kind of split up is by having a high amount of carbs on my high carb day, which for me would be somewhere around 400 grams, I would have one third or at the most half that amount for low carb day, and then try to get as close to 0 grams as possible on my no carb day and then repeat. An even more advanced approach would be to just cycle between high and no carb days. Or take it even a step further and do high, no, no. I don't really recommend having any more than two no carb days in a row. Make sure you don't jump to any extreme carb restrictions. An example of this is doing a 800 calorie diet when you could lose weight and maintain a better body composition with a 1500 calorie diet. Jumping to an extreme will not help you lose weight faster, in fact it'll probably backfire. Also in case you're wondering what kind of food you can eat on your no carb day, some great options are fish, chicken breast, ground turkey, protein shakes, Steak occasionally, and you can also have healthy fat sources like avocados, coconut oil, olive oil. and fatty fish like Salmon. For carbs make sure you are eating good sources of carbs like oats, brown rice, and sweet potatoes and avoid the junk food carbs. You can incorporate one cheat meal on one high carb day in the week, but that's it one cheat meal. You may notice that your strength and energy levels may go down while dieting like this. In fact you may feel like straight up garbage in the beginning. Understand that a lot of people feel this way when creating any kind of a calorie deficit. You're body will take a little while to adapt to using fat for energy instead of carbs. So the first 2 weeks can feel miserable. Give your body some time to adapt. A good idea is to plan your high carb days the day before a heavy lifting day, because this way you have stored glycogen available for your heavy lifts the next day. If you have no idea how many carbs to have on each day, try using a calorie calculator to find your maintenance macros and then add at least 50 grams of carbs to get the number for your high carb day. I'll include a calorie calculator in the description. Once you have your high carb number you should be able to figure out your low carb day. No carb day is obviously no carbs. After doing a carb cycling plan you may need to do some reverse dieting

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower leve Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

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