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Respiratory Acidosis Treatment With Sodium Bicarbonate

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scarring and thickening of the lungs) Diseases of the chest (such as scoliosis) Diseases affecting the nerves and muscles that signal the lungs to inflate or deflate Drugs that suppress breathing (including powerful pain medicines, such as narcotics, and "downers," such as benzodiazepines), often when combined with alcohol Severe obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over a long time. This leads to a stable situation, because the kidneys increase body chemicals, such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can return the body to a state of balance. Some people with chronic respiratory acidosis get acute respiratory acidosis because an illness makes their condition worse. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis can arise from a break in any one of these links. For example, it can be caused from depression of the respiratory center through drugs or metabolic disease, or from limitations in chest wall expansion due to neuromuscular disorders or trauma (Table 90-1). It can also arise from pulmonary disease, card iog en ic pu lmon a ryedema, a spira tion of a foreign body or vomitus, pneumothorax and pleural space disease, or through mechanical hypoventilation. Unless there is a superimposed or secondary metabolic acidosis, the plasma anion gap will usually be normal in respiratory acidosis. Introduction Respiratory acidosis is characterized by an increased arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The major cause of respiratory acidosis is alveolar hypoventilation. The expected physiologic response is an increased PHCO3. The increase in concentration of bicarbonate ions (HCO3) in plasma (PHCO3) is tiny in patients with acute respiratory acidosis, but is much larger in patients with chronic respiratory acidosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation and is characterized by a low arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The expected physiologic response is a decrease in PHCO3. As in respiratory acidosis, this response is modest in patients with acute respiratory alkalosis and much larger in patients with chronic respiratory alkalosis. Although respiratory acid-base disorders are detected by measurement of PCO2 and pH in arterial blood and may reveal the presence of a serious underlying disease process that affected ventilation, it is important to recognize the effect of changes in capillary blood PCO2 in the different organs on the binding of H+ ions to intracellular proteins, which may change their charge, shape, and possibly their funct Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesn’t cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of Continue reading >>

The Use Of Sodium Bicarbonate In The Treatment Of Acidosis In Sepsis: A Literature Update On A Long Term Debate

The Use Of Sodium Bicarbonate In The Treatment Of Acidosis In Sepsis: A Literature Update On A Long Term Debate

Volume2015(2015), Article ID605830, 7 pages The Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in the Treatment of Acidosis in Sepsis: A Literature Update on a Long Term Debate 1Internal Medicine Department, University Hospital of Patras, 26500 Rion, Greece 2University of Patras School of Medicine, 26500 Rion, Greece 3Intensive Care Department, Brugmann University Hospital, 1030 Brussels, Belgium 4Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA Received 22 March 2015; Revised 29 June 2015; Accepted 1 July 2015 Copyright 2015 Dimitrios Velissaris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Introduction. Sepsis and its consequences such as metabolic acidosis are resulting in increased mortality. Although correction of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate seems a reasonable approach, there is ongoing debate regarding the role of bicarbonates as a therapeutic option. Methods. We conducted a PubMed literature search in order to identify published literature related to the effects of sodium bicarbonate treatment on metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. The search included all articles published in English in the last 35 years. Results. There is ongoing debate regarding the use of bicarbonates for the treatment of acidosis in sepsis, but there is a trend towards not using bicarbonate in sepsis patients with arterial blood gas . Conclusions. Routine use of bicarbonate for treatment of severe acidemia and lactic acidosis due to sepsis is subject of controversy, and current opinion does not favor routine use of bicarbonates. However, available evidence is inconclusive, and Continue reading >>

Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Abstract The utility of bicarbonate administration to patients with severe metabolic acidosis remains controversial. Chronic bicarbonate replacement is obviously indicated for patients who continue to lose bicarbonate in the ambulatory setting, particularly patients with renal tubular acidosis syndromes or diarrhea. In patients with acute lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis, lactate and ketone bodies can be converted back to bicarbonate if the clinical situation improves. For these patients, therapy must be individualized. In general, bicarbonate should be given at an arterial blood pH of ≤7.0. The amount given should be what is calculated to bring the pH up to 7.2. The urge to give bicarbonate to a patient with severe acidemia is apt to be all but irresistible. Intervention should be restrained, however, unless the clinical situation clearly suggests benefit. Here we discuss the pros and cons of bicarbonate therapy for patients with severe metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis is an acid-base disorder characterized by a primary consumption of body buffers including a fall in blood bicarbonate concentration. There are many causes (Table 1), and there are multiple mechanisms that minimize the fall in arterial pH. A patient with metabolic acidosis may have a normal or even high pH if there is another primary, contravening event that raises the bicarbonate concentration (vomiting) or lowers the arterial Pco2 (respiratory alkalosis). Metabolic acidosis differs from “acidemia” in that the latter refers solely to a fall in blood pH and not the process. A recent online survey by Kraut and Kurtz1 highlighted the uncertainty over when to give bicarbonate to patients with metabolic acidosis. They reported that nephrologists will prescribe therapy at a higher pH compared with Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Acidosis: Sodium Bicarbonate And Other Drugs

Treatment Of Acidosis: Sodium Bicarbonate And Other Drugs

Treatment of Acidosis: Sodium Bicarbonate and Other Drugs Lactic acidosis, defined as a lactate level > 5 mmol/1 and a pH 7.35, is far and away the most-important acidosis during critical illness and most of this discussion of acidosis treatment will focus on treatment of lactic acidosis. Even in the face of maximal supportive therapy, lactic acidosis is associated with a mortality of 60-90% [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ], so physicians have long relied on treatments to lower the [H+], such as sodium bicarbonate. Less common than lactic acidosis, and much more amenable to conventional treatments, are ketoacidoses and respiratory acidosis, but these too occasionally prompt consideration of alkalinizing therapies. Lowering the [H+] in blood depends on manipulating the strong ion difference ([SID]), total concentration of non-volatile weak acid buffer (ATOT), or arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2), or raising the total concentration of weak bases, BTOT (normally sufficiently small that it can be ignored). Therefore, potential treatments include: 1. Raise [SID]: a) add strong cations: bicarbonate, carbicarb, dialysis b) remove strong anions: dichloroacetate (DCA), dialysis, thiamine, riboflavin, vasoactive drugs? 2. Lower the paCO2: raise VE or lower VD/VT or VCO2 3. Reduce ATOT: remove albumin, but very limited effect Acute Lung InjurySodium BicarbonateAcute Respiratory Distress SyndromeLactic AcidosisDiabetic Ketoacidosis These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Weil MH, Afifi AA (1970) Experimental and clinical studies on lactate and pyruvate as indicators of th Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincents Ascension Health, Birmingham Respiratory acidosis is primary increase in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2) with or without compensatory increase in bicarbonate (HCO3); pH is usually low but may be near normal. Cause is a decrease in respiratory rate and/or volume (hypoventilation), typically due to CNS, pulmonary, or iatrogenic conditions. Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic; the chronic form is asymptomatic, but the acute, or worsening, form causes headache, confusion, and drowsiness. Signs include tremor, myoclonic jerks, and asterixis. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurements. The cause is treated; oxygen (O2) and mechanical ventilation are often required. Respiratory acidosis is carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation (hypercapnia) due to a decrease in respiratory rate and/or respiratory volume (hypoventilation). Causes of hypoventilation (discussed under Ventilatory Failure ) include Conditions that impair CNS respiratory drive Conditions that impair neuromuscular transmission and other conditions that cause muscular weakness Obstructive, restrictive, and parenchymal pulmonary disorders Hypoxia typically accompanies hypoventilation. Distinction is based on the degree of metabolic compensation; carbon dioxide is initially buffered inefficiently, but over 3 to 5 days the kidneys increase bicarbonate reabsorption significantly. Symptoms and signs depend on the rate and degree of Pco2 increase. CO2 rapidly diffuses across the blood-brain barrier. Symptoms and signs are a result of high CO2 concentrations and low pH in the CNS and any accompanying hypoxemia. Acute (or acutely wor Continue reading >>

4.5 Respiratory Acidosis - Compensation

4.5 Respiratory Acidosis - Compensation

Acid-Base Physiology 4.5.1 The compensatory response is a rise in the bicarbonate level This rise has an immediate component (due to a resetting of the physicochemical equilibrium point) which raises the bicarbonate slightly. Next is a slower component where a further rise in plasma bicarbonate due to enhanced renal retention of bicarbonate. The additional effect on plasma bicarbonate of the renal retention is what converts an "acute" respiratory acidsosis into a "chronic" respiratory acidosis. As can be seen by inspection of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (below), an increased [HCO3-] will counteract the effect (on the pH) of an increased pCO2 because it returns the value of the [HCO3]/0.03 pCO2 ratio towards normal. pH = pKa + log([HCO3]/0.03 pCO2) 4.5.2 Buffering in Acute Respiratory Acidosis The compensatory response to an acute respiratory acidosis is limited to buffering. By the law of mass action, the increased arterial pCO2 causes a shift to the right in the following reaction: CO2 + H2O <-> H2CO3 <-> H+ + HCO3- In the blood, this reaction occurs rapidly inside red blood cells because of the presence of carbonic anhydrase. The hydrogen ion produced is buffered by intracellular proteins and by phosphates. Consequently, in the red cell, the buffering is mostly by haemoglobin. This buffering by removal of hydrogen ion, pulls the reaction to the right resulting in an increased bicarbonate production. The bicarbonate exchanges for chloride ion across the erythrocyte membrane and the plasma bicarbonate level rises. In an acute acidosis, there is insufficient time for the kidneys to respond to the increased arterial pCO2 so this is the only cause of the increased plasma bicarbonate in this early phase. The increase in bicarbonate only partially returns the extracel Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Is The Correction With Bicarbonate Worth?

Respiratory Acidosis: Is The Correction With Bicarbonate Worth?

Respiratory acidosis: is the correction with bicarbonate worth? Gattinoni L, et al. Minerva Anestesiol. 2006. Institute of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. [email protected] Minerva Anestesiol. 2006 Jun;72(6):551-7. Bicarbonate infusion is traditionally used to increase pH during metabolic acidosis, but it has been also suggested to increase the pH during permissive hypercapnia. In this paper we will discuss the physicochemical effect of adding (Na+ HCO3-), first in a closed system (venous blood) and then in an open system (the blood after the lung). According to Stewart model, in the closed system two independent variables are changed (CO2 and strong ion difference). As a first result changes in pH are negligible. If the CO2 is cleared by the lung and the PCO2 is maintained as before the infusion, the rise in pH is due to the SID increase caused by the (Na+) rise. The effect is independent on (HCO3-) infusion and equivalent to adding (Na+ OH-) instead of (Na+ HCO3-). Continue reading >>

Intravenous Sodium Bicarbonate

Intravenous Sodium Bicarbonate

Robin Gross, William Peruzzi, in Critical Care Medicine (Third Edition) , 2008 Intravenous sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solution is an appropriate intervention for reversing metabolic acidemia, provided that lung and cardiac function are adequate. NaHCO3 solution adds HCO3 to the blood only after the CO2 load inherent in the NaHCO3 solution is eliminated by the lungs. When NaHCO3 solution is administered to a patient with acute ventilatory failure (respiratory acidosis), the Paco2 usually increases, and pH decreases because the CO2 load cannot be eliminated. As illustrated in Figure 14-8, low cardiac output may be a limiting factor in CO2 excretion. When NaHCO3 solution is administered to a patient with very poor cardiac output, the venous blood shows a paradoxical respiratory acidosis. When NaHCO3 is administered intravenously to correct severe metabolic acidemia, it is essential to quantify the abnormality as a guide to therapy. A simple way to calculate the amount of bicarbonate to administer is: mmol HCO3 = base deficit (mmol/L) ideal weight (kg) 0.25 (L/kg) where 0.25 represents the volume of distribution of the bicarbonate. It is generally prudent to administer one half to one third of the calculated deficit, obtain another ABG sample in 5 minutes, and re-evaluate. In Pocket Companion to Brenner and Rector's The Kidney (Eighth Edition) , 2011 In cases of intractable shock, metabolic acidosis may persist despite volume expansion and improved oxygen delivery. Intravenous bicarbonate is often used in this setting in an attempt to improve cardiac function. However, decreased cardiac contractility in the setting of lactic acidosis may be partially due to hypoxemia, hypoperfusion, or sepsis, and establishing the direct effects of the low pH is difficult. Many patients t Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Type 1 Renal Tubular Acidosis, Type 2 Renal Tubular Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Type 1 Renal Tubular Acidosis, Type 2 Renal Tubular Acidosis

Metabolic AcidosisTreatment & Management Author: Christie P Thomas, MBBS, FRCP, FASN, FAHA; Chief Editor: Vecihi Batuman, MD, FASN more... Treatment of acute metabolic acidosis by alkali therapy is usually indicated to raise and maintain the plasma pH to greater than 7.20. In the following two circumstances this is particularly important. When the serum pH is below 7.20, a continued fall in the serum HCO3- level may result in a significant drop in pH. This is especially true when the PCO2 is close to the lower limit of compensation, which in an otherwise healthy young individual is approximately 15 mm Hg. With increasing age and other complicating illnesses, the limit of compensation is likely to be less. A further small drop in HCO3- at this point thus is not matched by a corresponding fall in PaCO2, and rapid decompensation can occur. For example, in a patient with metabolic acidosis with a serum HCO3- level of 9 mEq/L and a maximally compensated PCO2 of 20 mm Hg, a drop in the serum HCO3- level to 7 mEq/L results in a change in pH from 7.28 to 7.16. A second situation in which HCO3- correction should be considered is in well-compensated metabolic acidosis with impending respiratory failure. As metabolic acidosis continues in some patients, the increased ventilatory drive to lower the PaCO2 may not be sustainable because of respiratory muscle fatigue. In this situation, a PaCO2 that starts to rise may change the plasma pH dramatically even without a significant further fall in HCO3-. For example, in a patient with metabolic acidosis with a serum HCO3- level of 15 and a compensated PaCO2 of 27 mm Hg, a rise in PaCO2 to 37 mm Hg results in a change in pH from 7.33 to 7.20. A further rise of the PaCO2 to 43 mm Hg drops the pH to 7.14. All of this would have occurred whi Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosistreatment & Management

Respiratory Acidosistreatment & Management

Respiratory AcidosisTreatment & Management Author: Ryland P Byrd, Jr, MD; Chief Editor: Zab Mosenifar, MD, FACP, FCCP more... Treatment of respiratory acidosis is primarily directed at the underlying disorder or pathophysiologic process. Caution should be exercised in the correction of chronic hypercapnia: too-rapid correction of the hypercapnia can result in metabolic alkalemia. Alkalization of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can result in seizures. The criteria for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) vary from institution to institution but may include patient confusion, lethargy, respiratory muscle fatigue, and a low pH (< 7.25). All patients who require tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation must be admitted to the ICU. Most acute care facilities require that all patients being treated acutely with noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NIPPV) be admitted to the ICU. Consider consultation with pulmonologists and neurologists for assistance with the evaluation and treatment of respiratory acidosis. Results from the history, physical examination, and available laboratory studies should guide the selection of the subspecialty consultants. Pharmacologic therapies are generally used as treatmentfor the underlying disease process. Bronchodilators such as beta agonists (eg, albuterol and salmeterol), anticholinergic agents (eg, ipratropium bromide and tiotropium), and methylxanthines (eg, theophylline) are helpful in treating patients with obstructive airway disease and severe bronchospasm. Theophylline may improve diaphragm muscle contractility and may stimulate the respiratory center. Respiratory stimulants have been used but have limited efficacy in respiratory acidosis caused by disease. Medroxyprogesterone increases central respiratory drive and may Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory acidosis develops when air exhaled out of the lungs does not adequately exchange the carbon dioxide formed in the body for the inhaled oxygen in air. There are many conditions or situations that may lead to this. One of the conditions that can reduce the ability to adequately exhale carbon dioxide (CO2) is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD. CO2 that is not exhaled can shift the normal balance of acids and bases in the body toward acidic. The CO2 mixes with water in the body to form carbonic acid. With chronic respiratory acidosis, the body partially makes up for the retained CO2 and maintains acid-base balance near normal. The body's main response is an increase in excretion of carbonic acid and retention of bicarbonate base in the kidneys. Medical treatment for chronic respiratory acidosis is mainly treatment of the underlying illness which has hindered breathing. Treatment may also be applied to improve breathing directly. Respiratory acidosis can also be acute rather than chronic, developing suddenly from respiratory failure. Emergency medical treatment is required for acute respiratory acidosis to: Regain healthful respiration Restore acid-base balance Treat the causes of the respiratory failure Here are some key points about respiratory acidosis. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Respiratory acidosis develops when decreased breathing fails to get rid of CO2 formed in the body adequately The pH of blood, as a measure of acid-base balance, is maintained near normal in chronic respiratory acidosis by compensating responses in the body mainly in the kidney Acute respiratory acidosis requires emergency treatment Tipping acid-base balance to acidosis When acid levels in the body are in balance with the base levels in t Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Acid-base balance disturbance from alveolar hypoventilation Rapid production of carbon dioxide Failure of ventilation increases partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic In acute respiratory acidosis: PaCO2 is > 45 mm Hg with accompanying acidemia (pH < 7.35) In chronic respiratory acidosis: PaCO2 is > 45 mm HG with normal/near-normal pH (renal compensation) and serum bicarbonate levels > 30 mEq/L Treatment directed at underlying disorder/pathophysiologic process Caution: too-rapid correction of hypercapnia can result in metabolic alkalemia CSF alkalization can result in seizures Due to alveolar hypoventilation from any cause CNS depression causing impaired ventilation most common cause Lung diseases causing abnormal alveolar gas exchange usually don't cause hypoventilation Stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia 2 degrees to hypoxia Hypercapnia only occurs if severe disease, respiratory muscle fatigue Accompanying acidemia (can be severe) Only acute compensatory response is intracellular buffering CNS: CVA, infection, trauma, tumor Pulmonary: PNA, COPD, PTX, PE. Pulmonary edema, Smoke inhalation Neuromuscular disease (myasthenia gravis, ALS, Guillain-Barre) Airway Obstruction: Foreign body, edema Increased dead space ventilation (from increased V/Q mismatch) Decreased diaphragm function (from fatigue and hyperinflation) Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (Pickwickian Syndrome) Severe restrictive ventilatory processes (interstitial fibrosis, thoracic deformities) Usually that of underlying disease Depends on rate of hypercapnia development Slowly developing hypercapnia (mild-moderate) - minimal symptoms When PCO2 > 70 [SI: > 9.3 kPa] acutely Confusion, somnolence, obtundation (CO2 narcosis) Mental status may be depresse Continue reading >>

Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy In Patients With Metabolic Acidosis

Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy In Patients With Metabolic Acidosis

The Scientific World Journal Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 627673, 13 pages Nephrology Division, Hospital General Juan Cardona, Avenida Pardo Bazán, s/n, Ferrol, 15406 A Coruña, Spain Academic Editor: Biagio R. Di Iorio Copyright © 2014 María M. Adeva-Andany et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc inter Continue reading >>

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