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Respiratory Acidosis Nursing Interventions

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Respiratory Acidosis

Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scarring and thickening of the lungs) Diseases of the chest (such as scoliosis) Diseases affecting the nerves and muscles that signal the lungs to inflate or deflate Drugs that suppress breathing (including powerful pain medicines, such as narcotics, and "downers," such as benzodiazepines), often when combined with alcohol Severe obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over a long time. This leads to a stable situation, because the kidneys increase body chemicals, such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can return the body to a state of balance. Some people with chronic respiratory acidosis get acute respiratory acidosis because an illness makes their condition worse. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. JackDagniels

    As we all know weight loss = calories out > energy in... and keto undeniably proves as a phenomenal way to go about this!
    Apart from the benefit of satiation, are there any other benefits of consuming fat in larger proportions than protein?

    With greater caloric deficits expediting weight-loss, wouldn't reducing the overall intake of calories, a process more easily accomplished through a (further) reduction of caloric heavy fat increase this?
    Minus the most likely heightened sense of hunger (sprung from reducing fat calories) are there any drawbacks of focusing on protein intake while undergoing larger deficits?
    Would a focus like this allow better muscle retention/maintenance at larger caloric deficits?
    Which brings me to ask:
    At what point does Gluconeogenesis become an issue while trying to decrease weight & ingest protein over fat?
    Tl;dr How2loseweight + musclemaitenance - skinnyfat for winrar.jpg
    Appreciate the help & keto on!

  2. anbeav

    With greater caloric deficits expediting weight-loss, wouldn't reducing the overall intake of calories, a process more easily accomplished through a (further) reduction of caloric heavy fat increase this?
    I think you're missing the point. Regardless of macronutrient intake, you should aim for the same caloric deficit so it's irrelevant.
    Minus the most likely heightened sense of hunger (sprung from reducing fat calories) are there any drawbacks of focusing on protein intake while undergoing larger deficits?
    Yes, muscle loss. Too big of a deficit, if your body can't mobilize enough fat, causes muscle loss. What you're describing is a protein-sparing modified fast and it causes weight loss but also a significant amount of muscle loss.
    Would a focus like this allow better muscle retention/maintenance at larger caloric deficits?
    No, this approach assures more muscle loss since it means a larger deficit. Also it's not sustainable long-term because eventually your energy tanks and it's really important to incorporate this strategy with frequent diet breaks.
    At what point does Gluconeogenesis become an issue while trying to decrease weight & ingest protein over fat?
    It's an overemphasized issue but the amount of protein you can eat and stay in ketosis varies - lean muscle mass, strength training. In general unless you're eating 1.5-2 grams/lb lean body mass it's not an issue. Also ketosis is not required for weight loss.
    If your goal is to lose weight and maintain muscle, you eat at a 15-20% deficit and meet your protein goal (0.8-1.2 grams/lb lean mass)

  3. JackDagniels

    Thanks a bunch for taking the time to reply - it's greatly appreciated!
    It's been a long week so bear with me - I'm not understanding why an emphasis on fat would spare more muscle as opposed to focusing on protein consumption (though still at a caloric deficit).

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