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Respiratory Acidosis Labs

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What is ALKALOSIS? What does ALKALOSIS mean? ALKALOSIS meaning - ALKALOSIS pronunciation - ALKALOSIS definition - ALKALOSIS explanation - How to pronounce ALKALOSIS? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Alkalosis is the result of a process reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia). In contrast to acidemia (serum pH 7.35 or lower), alkalemia occurs when the serum pH is higher than normal (7.45 or higher). Alkalosis is usually divided into the categories of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic alkalosis or a combined respiratory/metabolic alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation, resulting in a loss of carbon dioxide. Compensatory mechanisms for this would include increased dissociation of the carbonic acid buffering intermediate into hydrogen ions, and the related excretion of bicarbonate, both of which lower blood pH. Hyperventilation-induced alkalosis can be seen in several deadly central nervous system diseases such as strokes or Rett syndrome. Metabolic alkalosis can be caused by repeated vomiting, resulting in a loss of hydrochloric acid within the stomach content. Severe dehydration, and the consumption of alkali are other causes. It can also be caused by administration of diuretics and endocrine disorders such as Cushing's syndrome. Compensatory mechanism for metabolic alkalosis involve slowed breathing by the lungs to increase serum carbon dioxide, a condition leaning toward respiratory acidosis. As respiratory acidosis often accompanies the compensation for metabolic alkalosis, and vice versa, a delicate balance is created between these two conditions. Metabolic alkalosis is usually accompanied by low blood potassium concentration, causing, e.g., muscular weakness, muscle pain, and muscle cramps (from disturbed function of the skeletal muscles), and muscle spasms (from disturbed function of smooth muscles). It may also cause low blood calcium concentration. As the blood pH increases, blood transport proteins, such as albumin, become more ionized into anions. This causes the free calcium present in blood to bind more strongly with albumin. If severe, it may cause tetany.

Acidosis And Alkalosis

Find an explanation of your pathology test Acidosis and alkalosis are terms used to describe the abnormal conditions when a patients blood pH does not fall within the healthy range. Measuring the pH of blood is a way of determining how acidic or basic (alkaline) the blood is. Normal blood pH must be maintained within a narrow range of 7.35 - 7.45 to ensure that metabolic processes function properly and the right amount of blood is delivered to the tissues. Many diseases or situations can cause a patients blood pH to fall outside of these limits. In the human body, normal metabolism generates large quantities of acids that must be eliminated to maintain a normal pH balance. Most of the acid is carbonic acid which is produced when carbon dioxide (CO2) combines with water in the body. Lesser quantities of lactic acid, ketoacids and other organic acids are also produced. This balance can be disrupted by a build-up of an acid or a base (alkali) or by an increased loss of an acid or a base (see Figure 1, below). Acidosis occurs when blood pH falls below 7.35 Alkalosis occurs when blood pH rises above 7.45 Both of these conditions act as an alarm to the body; they trigger actions intende Continue reading >>

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  1. * DKA explanation

    * DKA explanation

    Below you will find a terrific explanation of DKA from one of the instructors at Med School Tutors. If you like what you see and may be interested in learning more about one-on-one instruction from MST, then please visit their website at www.medschooltutors.com
    In order to understand how to treat DKA, it is useful to first understand what is going on in the body when DKA develops. First of all, DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) typically develops when a Type I diabetic does not take his or her insulin for a prolonged period of time. It may also be the presentation for new onset diabetes. Because these patients are insulin deficient, they are not able to take up glucose into their cells. This results in two important consequences: 1)glucose builds up in the blood and causes hyperglycemia and 2)the body's cells are forced to breakdown fat for energy, instead of glucose.
    These are very significant consequences... The hyperglycemia results in an osmotic diuresis, because the proximal tubule of the kidney can't reabsorb all the glucose filtered into the nephron. What is osmotic diuresis? Simply that the hyperglycemia (usually >300) causes the body to excrete lots and lots of water, because the osmotic pull of all the glucose particles prevents the reabsorbtion of water in the collecting duct. This means that patients with DKA are peeing their brains out!! They pee out sodium, potassium, and water.. And are therefore, very very very DEHYDRATED, sodium depleted, and potassium depleted.
    Now for the metabolism end of things... The body cells are forced to metabolize fat for energy rather than glucose. How do they accomplish this? - beta-oxidation of fatty acids. This results in excess production of ketone bodies which deplete available acid buffers. This causes a significant metabolic acidosis, with a high anion gap due to the presence of ketoacids. The acidosis causes potassium to shift from the intracellular space to the extracellular space. This may result in a normal or high serum potassium level. This normal or high potassium level masks what is typically significant potassium depletion because the person was peeing all their potassium out as a result of the uncontrolled hyperglycemia.
    So what are we going to do now? I will give a very brief answer for now, expect people to ask questions in the meantime, and then provide a more thorough approach to treatment in the coming days.
    1)Give the patient tons of normal saline. Why? - because your patient is dehydrated as all hell. They have been peeing out every last drop of water because of their severe uncontrolled hyperglycemia. These patients require liters of fluid to replenish all the fluid they've lost as a result of the osmotic diuresis.
    2)Give them insulin. Why? - NOT because it will lower the blood glucose level, but because it will cause a shift away from fat metabolism and toward glucose metabolism. This will slow the production of ketone bodies which are precipitating the metabolic acidosis. Thus, I will repeat, we give insulin to shift away from fat metabolism and stop the production of ketone bodies.
    3)Give the patient potassium. Why? - As we discussed earlier, the person has been peeing out all of their potassium stores and are overall very potassium depleted, despite having normal or high serum potassium levels to begin with. In addition to being potassium depleted, the insulin you are giving will cause a shift of potassium from the extracellular space to the intracellular space, which will drop the serum potassium. Thus, we give DKA patients potassium way before they become hypokalemic.
    4)Give the patient dextrose. Why? - They insulin you are giving the patient is obviously going to cause the serum glucose to decrease. We give glucose to prevent hypoglycemia as we continue to give insulin.
    How do we know when we are finished treating these patients? - When the anion gap returns to normal.
    That's all for now. Please ask any questions you have. I will be giving more specifics about DKA management in the near future.
    PS: Does anyone know the dangerous consequence of giving DKA patients fluid too rapidly? What are the symptoms this may cause, and what is the pathophysiology behind these symptoms?

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Arterial Blood Gases - Indications And Interpretation

Severely unwell patients from any cause - affects prognosis. Arterial blood can be obtained by direct arterial puncture most usually at the wrist (radial artery). Alternatives to the radial artery include the femoral and brachial artery - both of which are usually used in emergency settings. The dorsalis pedis artery and ulnar artery may also be used. It is important to ensure good collateral circulation (see below), as there is a theoretical risk of thrombus occlusion. If multiple samples are required then an indwelling arterial cannula can be placed. Allow the patient to titrate with the oxygen for 5-10 minutes (30 minutes if they have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)) before taking a sample. If the radial artery is to be used, perform Allen's test to confirm collateral blood flow to the hand. Elevate the hand and make a fist for approximately 30 seconds. Apply pressure over the ulnar and the radial arteries occluding both (keep the hand elevated). Release pressure on the ulnar artery and look for perfusion of the hand (this takes under eight seconds). If there is any delay then it may not be safe to perform radial artery puncture. Explain the procedure to the patien Continue reading >>

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  1. twosix

    Where can I buy ketostix? Been to many pharmacies like Guardian and NTUC around city area and all of them do not carry it.

  2. Gustoftw

    I bought mine from NTUC unity bukit timah plaza

  3. twosix

    Gustoftw wrote:
    I bought mine from NTUC unity bukit timah plaza Thanks, but the location is far from my place.

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an abnormal clinical process that causes the arterial Pco2 to increase to greater than 40 mm Hg. Increased CO2 concentration in the blood may be secondary to increased CO2 production or decreased ventilation. Larry R. Engelking, in Textbook of Veterinary Physiological Chemistry (Third Edition) , 2015 Respiratory acidosis can arise from a break in any one of these links. For example, it can be caused from depression of the respiratory center through drugs or metabolic disease, or from limitations in chest wall expansion due to neuromuscular disorders or trauma (Table 90-1). It can also arise from pulmonary disease, card iog en ic pu lmon a ryedema, a spira tion of a foreign body or vomitus, pneumothorax and pleural space disease, or through mechanical hypoventilation. Unless there is a superimposed or secondary metabolic acidosis, the plasma anion gap will usually be normal in respiratory acidosis. Kamel S. Kamel MD, FRCPC, Mitchell L. Halperin MD, FRCPC, in Fluid, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Physiology (Fifth Edition) , 2017 Respiratory acidosis is characterized by an increased arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The major cause of respiratory acido Continue reading >>

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  1. Courtney Schumacher

    Ketoacidosis

    Comas

    Medical Treatments

    Medical Conditions and Diseases


    Neuroscience

    Medicine and Healthcare



    Why does Ketoacidosis cause coma? How is it treated?




    1 Answer







    I’m assuming that you do know that ketoacidosis does not have to mean that you have high blood sugar. It means that you have a high level of ketones in your blood, which are usually by-products of your body trying to break down fatty acids for fuel it’s not getting from your food intake.
    It is usually treated with fluids, electrolytes, and insulin. It is much more common in those with type 1 diabetes then type 2, but it can still occur.

    You can look up more specific information on diabetes at the Mayo Clinic site.

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