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Respiratory Acidosis And Alkalosis Ppt

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ABGs Tic Tac Toe Method for Nurses with QUIZ: This video tutorial is on how to set-up arterial blood gas problems using the tic tac toe method. This TIC TACE TOE method is so super easy when solving respiratory alkalosis, acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, or acidosis. Nursing students will be tested on this material in nursing school, and this is one of the easiest ways to solve these arterial blood gas problems. This is an "ABGs made easy for nurses and nursing students" tutorial. Arterial Blood Gas Quizzes: http://www.registerednursern.com/abg-... Video: How to use the Tic Tac Toe Method for PARTIALLY vs FULLY Compensated ABGs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_V8E... Respiratory Acidosis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0Vjn... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

American Thoracic Society - Interpretation Of Arterial Blood Gases (abgs)

Interpretation of Arterial Blood Gases (ABGs) Chief, Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine Bridgeport Hospital-Yale New Haven Health Assistant Clinical Professor, Yale University School of Medicine (Section of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine) Interpreting an arterial blood gas (ABG) is a crucial skill for physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and other health care personnel. ABG interpretation is especially important in critically ill patients. The following six-step process helps ensure a complete interpretation of every ABG. In addition, you will find tables that list commonly encountered acid-base disorders. Many methods exist to guide the interpretation of the ABG. This discussion does not include some methods, such as analysis of base excess or Stewarts strong ion difference. A summary of these techniques can be found in some of the suggested articles. It is unclear whether these alternate methods offer clinically important advantages over the presented approach, which is based on the anion gap. Step 1: Assess the internal consistency of the values using the Henderseon-Hasselbach equation: If the pH and the [H+] are inconsistent, the ABG is probably no Continue reading >>

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  1. lw_onevoice

    I've been on induction for a week, following it very good. No cheating. My net carbs are at 20, I'm turning keto sticks purple..etc. I either gain or maintain every day, except for two days. One day I worked out very lightly, and lost half a lb. Another day I didn't work out at all and lost 2 lbs. All the other days I've worked out 2-4 hours.. pretty intense, because I'm training for a big hike (it's in two more weeks now!)I'm trying to get my body in condition for that.
    I weight 220 lbs (give or take a lb when I maintain, lose, or gain) I am eating between 2,400 and 2,600 calories. (I heard rule of thumb was to eat 10-12 times your weight in calories) and again, keeping the net carbs to 20, total carbs are like 38 or so when i have a MIM, total carbs are lower on days I don't have a MIM.
    Take Monday for example. I ate 2600 calories, lost two lbs. yesterday I ate 2,800 calories, but worked out and burned 1,600 calories.
    I'm getting about 130 grams of protein a day, and my fat percent is between 65-72%.
    Do I need to eat even MORE calories than the 2,600 on the days I work out that much? Is it possible I'm stalling because on days I'm burning 1,600 calories the 2,600 is not enough and causes a stall?
    Just wondering if anyone has any knowledge on that.. if I need to eat even MORE than 2,600.. cause that's like a ton of food! And get's expensive too! lol
    What do you think?

  2. Ghostly1968

    Sounds like, first you are putting on muscle, muscle weighs more than fat, second, you might be shutting down your metabolism instead of revving it up because your body is not getting enough. Just my thoughts.
    If you keep doing what you've been doing, you'll keep getting what you've been getting.
    Life is like a box of chocalates, you never know what you got until you take a bite - Forrest Gump

  3. lw_onevoice

    That's what I was wondering...but it's counter intuitive to me to eat more than 2,600..even with Atkins, yet if I'm burning 1.600...
    I'm not working out heavy to lose weight, I'm doing Atkins to lose weight. I'm working out like a mad woman to get in shape for this hike lol..I've lost great before on induction, but I didn't workout..

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops Continue reading >>

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  1. Jen100

    > Bladder Pain and Ketosis

    I dont know if I am imagining this or not but, but everytime I go into Ketosis, my bladder seems to hurt. Does anyone know if bladder pain can be a symptom of ketosis?? I have bladder pain and some burning sensations when I pee (I know this is a symptom of bladder infection too, but it seems to come and go with ketosis)

  2. mj's page

    Is it possible that you're reading a strong positive for ketosis partially because you're not drinking enough?

  3. Deezil

    Well, I googled 'bladder pain and ketosis' and came across this blurb..
    Ketosis is a metabolic state in which the body produces ketones to be used as fuel by some organs so that glycogen can be reserved for organs that depend on it. It is important when looking for information on ketosis that it is not confused for ketoacidosis - a very unhealthy state of being. It is unfortunately all too common for information sources to conflate these two and thus pronounce ketosis as bad.
    Because glucose is commonly accepted as the body's primary fuel source, putting the body into a state where burning something other than glucose for fuel is subsequently regarded as a form of starvation. Yet, the human body has a well-defined mechanism for literally burning fat for fuel (I think it's important to realize that even in the presence of glucose, some tissues in the human body still prefer to use fat for fuel. Ironically, the heart is one of those, despite the fact that the intended purpose of low-fat diets is to save your heart). When the body uses fat as energy, it's in a state of ketosis.
    When you stop eating glucose (ie: carbohydrates), your body begins the process of ketosis. In ketosis, the liver starts unpacking fat cells so that your body can use the fatty acids for fuel. It also produces ketone bodies, which the body also uses for fuel - especially the brain. The benefits of ketosis are numerous - lowered blood pressure, lower cholesterol, low triglycerides, improved insulin sensitivity, and weight loss without regard to calorie count. Other reported benefits are common - lack of hunger, lack of cravings, improved mood, lessened anxiety, and greater mental concentration. Variations on ketogenic diets are used to control various medical conditions including acne, heartburn and acid reflux, thyroid problems, epilepsy, and type 2 diabetes.
    Negative side effects of a ketogenic diet include light-headedness, headache, lethargy, weakness, feeling cold, diarrhea, and nausea. These side effects are only temporary and go away once the body has fully made the switch from burning glucose to burning fat (within the first week). They are almost universally acknowleged as symptoms of withdrawal from sugar.
    The body is very capable of regulating ketone bodies, so unless there is a major problem (Alcoholics and type 1 diabetics often have problems with ketone regulation), you should be just fine. For those people who do have a major problem, however, they can develop ketoacidosis. Essentially, their bodies no longer regulate the ketones in their blood, and they start building up. The more they build up, the more they change the acidity of the blood in your body, and that's very dangerous. The complications of ketoacidosis include halitosis, extreme thirst, frequent urination, contant fatigue, dry skin, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, and mental confusion.
    If you're looking to lose weight without eating less, improve your mood and mental acuity, or even to solve some common health issues like acne or acid reflux, a ketogenic diet (also called a homeostatic diet) may be exactly the right tool for you. Just keep an eye out for the symptoms of ketoacidosis, and you should have no problems at all once you get past those nasty withdrawal symptoms.
    http://ezinearticles.com/?Ketosis---Restoring-Health-Around-the-Globe&id=2289059
    Hmmmmm......

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Hello guys In this video discuss about the basic concept of acidosis and alkalosis and Discuss the topic of respiratory acidosis The cause Sign symptom and treatment Please subscribe my channel for more video And comment which video you want discuss in next videos. Thanks

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosisis an acid-base imbalance characterized by increased partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide and decreased blood pH. The prognosis depends on the severity of the underlying disturbance as well as the patients general clinical condition. Compensatory mechanisms include (1) an increased respiratory rate; (2) hemoglobin (Hb) buffering, forming bicarbonate ions and deoxygenated Hb; and (3) increased renal ammonia acid excretions with reabsorption of bicarbonate. Acute respiratory acidosis:Associated with acute pulmonary edema, aspiration of foreign body, overdose of sedatives/barbiturate poisoning, smoke inhalation, acute laryngospasm, hemothorax / pneumothorax , atelectasis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), anesthesia/ surgery , mechanical ventilators, excessive CO2intake (e.g., use of rebreathing mask, cerebral vascular accident [CVA] therapy), Pickwickian syndrome. Chronic respiratory acidosis:Associated with emphysema , asthma , bronchiectasis; neuromuscular disorders (such as Guillain-Barr syndrome and myasthenia gravis); botulism; spinal cord injuries. Condition, prognosis, and treatment needs understood. Plan in place to meet needs after disch Continue reading >>

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  1. Andy030

    HELP!
    I'm kicking as and taking names with Intermittent Fasting and periodic low carb on top but my breath is scaring the children.
    Other than brush my teeth every 20 min, what the heck works?
    I'm constantly chewing gum and using breath spray and mouthwash but even then my wife says she can smell rotton iron on my breath.
    Years ago I heard about something you drink to take the smell out of your stomach but I can't remember what it is and I don't know if it can be used during fasting.
    I'm dying here...... well, others are

  2. CaptShady

    This is a cut and paste, but sounds worthy of trying:

    Good advice to lessen bad breath problems is drinking water and chewing parsley. If you drink more water you will go to the toilette more frequently, so more of the ketone bodies will leave your body with the urine.

  3. Steve Freides

    All sorts of weirdnesses are not uncommon when your body detoxifies - hopefully, it goes away with the passage of time, perhaps with eating cleaner along with IF and low-carb.
    I've heard this associated more with low-carb than with WD/IF type eating plans.
    -S-
    KBNJ.COM - Steve Freides, RKC Team Leader

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