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Renal Tubular Acidosis Type 4

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What is systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)? SLE's an autoimmune disease that can affect any tissue or organ in the body, but most often affects the skin, kidneys, and joints. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what youre learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the worlds caregivers with the best learning experience possible.

Symptomatic Renal Tubular Acidosis (rta) In Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: An Analysis Of Six Cases With New Association Of Type 4 Rta

Symptomatic renal tubular acidosis (RTA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: an analysis of six cases with new association of type 4 RTA Correspondence to: L. B. Liou, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San Hsiang, Tao-Yuan County, Taiwan 333. E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Rheumatology, Volume 44, Issue 9, 1 September 2005, Pages 11761180, S. L. Li, L. B. Liou, J. T. Fang, W. P. Tsai; Symptomatic renal tubular acidosis (RTA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: an analysis of six cases with new association of type 4 RTA, Rheumatology, Volume 44, Issue 9, 1 September 2005, Pages 11761180, Objectives. We have analysed the association between different parameters of renal tubular acidosis (RTA) with clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. Review of hospital database records between 1978 and 2003 revealed six SLE patients with RTA. Correlations and comparisons were done by Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the 2 test. Results. Four patients had hypokalaemia (type 1 RTA) and two patients had hyperkalaemia (ty Continue reading >>

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  1. ketogu88

    Had follow-up lipid tests and they are horrible. I have done my research and I know about how these tests aren't the most instructive things in terms of health. However I'm concerned about the dramatic changes for the worst in every category despite having great success with my diet for last 6 months. I have basically lost 30 pounds, 3-4 inches of my waist, and now at 165pounds / 6"0 / M with much more muscle mass + physical health. Before this test I would have told you I was in best shape of my life. I have been strictly on Keto (no cheat days) for 6 months before taking test. My diet was heavy in steaks/chicken/lamb and lots of greeny vegetables + cheese. Snacked on nuts/seeds. I know some will tell me to ignore these results as they are not indicative/correlated with heart disease, but how about for insurance purposes? My rates will be jacked up, and my doctor is already talking about medication. I have follow-up test in 6 months. Is there anything I can do to get better results (even for temporarily) before I take the next test. Before/After results below.
    Before Total: 221.6 Trig: 18.6 HDL: 59.9 LDL: 153.1
    After Total: 367.7 Trig: 35.2 HDL: 54.1 LDL: 297

  2. HamptonSpooner

    Not while I was doing keto but after a cholesterol scare from a life insurance exam, I started psyllium husk fiber capsules. In a few months time, it lowered my cholesterol 50 points. That is with not even taking the recommend amount and with a sedentary lifestyle. Might be something for you to look into.

  3. gogge

    Some people react badly to saturated fat and dietary cholesterol, Peter Attia talks a bit about this in one of his articles:
    However, some readers may interpret the data I present to mean it’s perfectly safe to consume, say, 25% (or more) of total calories from SFA. I realize I may have to turn in my keto-club card, but I am convinced that a subset of the population—I don’t know how large or small, because my “N” is too small—are not better served by mainlining SFA, even in the complete absence of carbohydrates (i.e., nutritional ketosis). Let me repeat this point: I have seen enough patients whose biomarkers go to hell in a hand basket when they ingest very high amounts of SFA. This leads me to believe some people are not genetically equipped to thrive in prolonged nutritional ketosis.
    Peter Attia, "Random finding (plus pi)".
    You might want to focus on unsaturated fats like olive/canola/avocado oil over saturated fats like butter or coconut oil.
    Thomas Dayspring has a great article on low carb and cholesterol values, from another thread:
    Some people react badly to saturated fat and dietary cholesterol (hyperresponders, longer post), they can probably still do keto (depends on how sensitive they are) just don't overdo the coconut oil, butter (eat more olive/avocado/canola oil instead) and cut down on eggs.
    Others might do better on just general non-ketogenic low carb, check out this article from Thomas Dayspring (a lipidologist referenced by Peter Attia and Gary Taubes) with a case very similar to yours (formatted for readability):
    “I started eating paleo/low-carb (with dairy) in Apr 2011. I should add that my diet has never been ultra low-carb -- just lower-carb than most people. My last blood test before going paleo was in Nov 2010 and my past numbers have always been similar:”
    Total cholesterol = 196
    LDL-C =105
    HDL-C = 75
    TG = 78 (all in mg/dL)
    TSH = 2.15
    “I lost 30 pounds in about 3 months and have kept it off ever since. Today I weigh 124 and maintain my weight easily eating this way, even though I am menopausal.”
    The lipid panel was repeated on the new diet:
    TC = 323
    LDL-C = 230
    HDL-C 83
    TG 49 (all in mg/dL)
    Total LDL-P = 2643 nmol/L (99 th percentile population cut point)
    TG/HDL-C = 0.59 (poor man’s marker of insulin sensitivity) Under 2.0 is excellent
    Not great changes, very high LDL cholesterol similar to your reaction, and this likely also means very high LDL particle count.
    Here's what they did:
    The dietary advice was to cut back on saturated fat and use more MUFA and PUFA without increasing carbs. After doing just that for a few months the patient reports:
    “The only modifications I've made because of my high lipids are eating steel cut oats regularly, adding chia seeds to my diet, and eating apples regularly (to increase fiber levels); cutting out most dairy; and watching my saturated fat intake a little more closely--all aimed at getting my high LDL-P down.” Weight has remained stable.
    Here are the follow up labs:
    TC = 178
    LDL-C = 92 (was 230)
    HDL-C = 82
    TG = 21
    Non-HDL-C = 96 (all inmg/dL)
    Total LDL-P: 948 nmol/L (recall it was grossly elevated at 2643) < 1000 nmol/L (20 th percentile population cut point) is desirable
    Small LDL-P: < 90 nmol/L (normal)
    LDL Size: 21.4 nm (quite large)
    CRP was near 0.
    Thomas Dayspring, "Lipidaholics Anonymous Case 291 Can losing weight worsen lipids?"
    The article is a very long read, but it's also absolutely excellent at explaining why some people can react badly and what to really look for in a lipid test, and what to do about it when things look bad.

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This is a review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of Renal Tubular Acidosis intended for 3rd and 4th year medical students and others learning clinical medicine.

Diabetes Mellitus And Hyperkalemic Renal Tubular Acidosis: Case Reports And Literature Review

Diabetes mellitus and hyperkalemic renal tubular acidosis: case reports and literature review Carlos Henrique Pires Ratto TavaresBello 1 Hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism, despite being common, remains an underdiagnosed entity that is more prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus. It presents with asymptomatic hyperkalemia along with hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis without significant renal function impairment. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is not fully understood, but it is postulated that either aldosterone deficiency (hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism) and/or target organ aldosterone resistance (pseudohypoaldosteronism) may be responsible. Diagnosis is based on laboratory parameters. Treatment strategy varies according to the underlying pathophysiological mechanism and etiology and aims to normalize serum potassium. Two clnical cases are reported and the relevant literature is revisited. Keywords:acidosis; acidosis, renal tubular; diabetes mellitus; hyperkalemia; hypoaldosteronism Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) comprises relatively frequent forms of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. This medical condition is underdiagnosed and poorly understood due to the comple Continue reading >>

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  1. karen78

    Hi there,
    I just have my blood test result few weeks back. In my urine test, protein was trace and that the ketone with 2+ was found. What does all this mean?
    Anyone know this? Please help.
    Thanks.

  2. karen78

    Hi Rntdj,
    Thanks for your help.
    During the blood test, I also test for the diabetes. And it shows that my glucose level is 4.5 mmol/l. My diet, I do not think that it's normal becuase I am avoiding (take less) food which is consider as sweet, contain fat or oily food. I am scared to gain any weight. My appetide is not that good so I eat less, facing symptom of hand shaking, tired, lack of energy, dizzy mostly. I do not use alcohol. So, does it mean that I am having malnutrition?
    About protein found in urine, does it also mean that there is possibility the kidney is facing some infection ie vagina infection etc? How about drink less plain water ie mean seldom drink water or any type of drinks?
    Awaiting for your reply.
    Thanks.

  3. Theresa Jones

    is with in normal limits. When the nutrition requirements are less than a person's food intake the body begins using it's own stores in an attempt to halt starvation. Malnutrition can be very serious as initial signs or symptoms may be slow to appear but once they become apparent damage can already be done. My first suggestion is improve your diet. A healthy diet will provide your body with energy to function without causing weight gain. You need adequate fluid intake/water to keep you body hydrated. I would suggest that if your physician is not aware that your dietary habits are less than adequate you discuss this with him/her to find a healthy approach. Malnutrition or starvation is not the answer.

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What is renal tubular acidosis (RTA)? RTA is a type of metabolic acidosis caused by the kidneys failure to properly acidify the urine. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what youre learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Sumant Nanduri Omar Berrios Alex Wright Sabrina Wong Suzanne Peek Arfan Azam Mingli Fng Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the worlds caregivers with the best learning experience possible.

Renal Tubular Acidosis

Significant bilateral nephrocalcinosis (calcification of the kidneys) on a frontal X-ray (radiopacities (white) in the right upper and left upper quadrant of the image), as seen in distal renal tubular acidosis. Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a medical condition that involves an accumulation of acid in the body due to a failure of the kidneys to appropriately acidify the urine . [1] In renal physiology , when blood is filtered by the kidney, the filtrate passes through the tubules of the nephron , allowing for exchange of salts , acid equivalents, and other solutes before it drains into the bladder as urine . The metabolic acidosis that results from RTA may be caused either by failure to reabsorb sufficient bicarbonate ions (which are alkaline ) from the filtrate in the early portion of the nephron (the proximal tubule ) or by insufficient secretion of hydrogen ions (which are acidic) into the latter portions of the nephron (the distal tubule ). Although a metabolic acidosis also occurs in those with renal insufficiency , the term RTA is reserved for individuals with poor urinary acidification in otherwise well-functioning kidneys. Several different types of RTA exist, which all Continue reading >>

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  1. Kodah007

    I'm new here and may be too late for this discussion. Our 8 year old husky was in diabetic ketoacidosis 4 days ago. 3 nights on fluid at vet, started insulin, steroids and pain meds. She cannot walk on her own, like her hind legs are totally numb. She's also been going potty on herself at vet. I'm really worried she won't get better and I don't have the time to be carrying her around and/or cleaning up messes. How long can I expect this yo last? Do all dogs recover?

  2. k9diabetes

    Hi,
    I decided to copy your question to a thread of your own... so sorry such a scary experience brings you here.
    If she can get past the ketoacidosis, whatever leg problems and incontinence coming from neuropathy should gradually diminish with better blood sugar.
    Most dogs I've seen have fully recovered from neuropathy. Sometimes a dog has other spinal issues also involved and in those cases the problems associated with neuropathy go away so things get better.
    So, yes, chances are very good she can get back to normal. Beaming her Get Well wishes.... hang in there.
    Natalie

  3. Rubytuesday

    Hi there,
    If the sole cause of weakness in the backend is diabetic neuropathy, and it could well be, they can recover and go on to be healthy diabetics. Surviving diabetic ketoacidosis can take quite a toll on them and I would not judge her condition now as long as she isn't suffering. weakness isn't a lot of fun for either of you but they can get back to normal.
    I will attach some info about a key role a specific form of B-12 (methylcobalimin) plays in recovery.
    Many dogs here have struggled with hind end weakness. Has the B-12 helped in these cases? I don't know, but it hasn't hurt.
    The single most important thing you can do now is to find the best dose to manage her diabetes. This can be a trying process. To tell the truth this was the best place I found for getting the best information about how to go about that. My dog wasn't an easy diabetic and frankly my vets didn't know what to do to make our situation better. Folks here helped us tremendously. The collective knowledge and creativity was a godsend.
    I found that I couldn't rely on just the guidance from my vet and some stories I have heard have been downright scary. The best advice I can give is read a lot from the home page and threads, ask a bunch of questions and if at all possible give home testing a try. Doing your own home testing not only saves you money and keeps your dog safe, but it will help you progess through the regulation process a bit quicker.
    I will go grab the home page link for you and the b-12 info. Just don't want to lose this post. The ipad sometimes doesn't like me switching around.
    Tara
    ____________

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