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Relion Ketone Meter

Glucose Meter Shopping Guide

Glucose Meter Shopping Guide

By the dLife Editors Looking for a blood glucose monitor? Here’s our extensive guide to the products on the market today. dLife does not endorse any product mentioned here. Links to manufacturers’ websites are offered for information purposes only. Abbot The FreeStyle Freedom Lite Blood Glucose Monitoring System has a new ergonomic shape and large numeral display. There is no coding and allows for easy testing with the world’s smallest sample size. This meter uses only FreeStyle Lite test strips. Blood Sample Size Required: 0.3 uL Time to Results: 5-seconds Battery Requirements: (1) CR2032 lithium coin cell Alternative Site Testing: Yes Data Capabilities: Computer download capabilities; stores up to 400 results with date and time User Coding Required: No Other Special Features: Four reminder alarms; ability to add more blood for up to one minute; provides results in 7-, 14-, and 30-day averages Company Contact Information: Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 1-800-522-5226 www.abbottdiabetescare.com The FreeStyle Lite Blood Glucose Monitoring System is a small and discreet system that offers key features such as no coding, the world’s smallest blood sample size, and a test strip port light. The FreeStyle Lite meter uses only FreeStyle Lite test strips. Blood Sample Size Required: 0.3 uL Time to Results: 5-seconds Battery Requirements: (1) CR2032 lithium coin cell Alternative Site Testing: Yes Data Capabilities: Computer download capabilities; stores up to 400 results with date and time User Coding Required: No Other Special Features: Port light and backlight on display; four reminder alarms; provides 7-, 14-, and 30-day averages Company Contact Information: Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 1-800-522- Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Ketone Test Strips

Ketosis & Ketone Test Strips

Discuss this article! By Doreen EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT KETOSIS ... 1. What are ketones? 2. How will ketosis help me to lose weight? 3. But, isn't ketosis dangerous? 4. How do the ketone test strips work, and where do I get them? 5. I'm following Induction strictly; why won't my strips turn purple? 6. Will I lose weight faster if the strips show dark purple all the time? 7. Does caffeine affect ketosis? 8. Will drinking alcohol affect ketosis? What are ketones? Ketones are a normal and efficient source of fuel and energy for the human body. They are produced by the liver from fatty acids, which result from the breakdown of body fat in response to the absence of glucose/sugar. In a ketogenic diet, such as Atkins ... or diets used for treating epilepsy in children, the tiny amounts of glucose required for some select functions can be met by consuming a minimum amount of carbs - or can be manufactured in the liver from PROTEIN. When your body is producing ketones, and using them for fuel, this is called "ketosis". How will ketosis help me to lose weight? Most reducing diets restrict calorie intake, so you lose weight but some of that is fat and some of it is lean muscle tissue as well. Less muscle means slowed metabolism, which makes losing weight more difficult and gaining it back all too easy. Ketosis will help you to lose FAT. Being in ketosis means that your body's primary source of energy is fat (in the form of ketones). When you consume adequate protein as well, there's no need for the body to break down its muscle tissue. Ketosis also tends to accelerate fat loss --- once the liver converts fat to ketones, it can't be converted back to fat, and so is excreted. But, isn't ketosis dangerous? Being in ketosis by following a low carbohydrate diet is Continue reading >>

Precision Xtra

Precision Xtra

SIMPLE BLOOD GLUCOSE & KETONE TESTING IN THE SAME METER The Precision Xtra system offers intuitive setup and simple icon-driven menus that help simplify blood glucose monitoring. The Precision Xtra system tests both blood glucose and blood ketone all with the same meter using the Precision Xtra blood glucose test strips and Precision Xtra blood ketone test strips. EASY, EVERYDAY TESTING Simple 2-Step Testing Insert strip, add adequate blood sample, and test begins Smart Icon-Driven Menu Intuitive setup and easy navigation Easy-to-Use Buttons Easy to review results—with ability to scroll back and forth PRECISION XTRA BLOOD GLUCOSE TEST STRIPS No coding means one less step Accurate results in 5 seconds Small sample size – only 0.6 µL Individually wrapped for easy testing on-the-go PRECISION XTRA BLOOD KETONE TEST STRIP No coding means one less step Accurate results in 10 seconds Sample size - only 1.5 µL Individually wrapped for easy testing on-the-go QUICK LINKS The Virtual Product Manual Owner’s Guide: English | Español Log Book Precision Xtra Glucose Test Strips - Instructions for use Precision Xtra Ketone Test Strips - Instructions for use Data Management Software Continue reading >>

Abbott’s Precision Xtra Monitor Now Being Sold As Relion Ultima At Walmart

Abbott’s Precision Xtra Monitor Now Being Sold As Relion Ultima At Walmart

I was walking through my local Walmart in Spartanburg, South Carolina recently where I ended up browsing around the pharmacy department. I’m always interested in seeing what new health gizmos and gadgets come out and then show up on store shelves for consumers to purchase. When I got close to the glucometers, I noticed their ReliOn brand of blood glucose meters had expanded into several different versions now. One in particular caught my attention because it looked very familiar–the ReliOn Ultima. To confirm my suspicions that this ReliOn Ultima was the same meter as the Precision Xtra, I bought one for $15 at Walmart along with some of their blood glucose testing strips and compared them when I got home. IT’S EXACTLY THE SAME! I took it one step further to confirm that it was the identical meter by putting one of my Precision Xtra blood ketone strips into it and it registered my results exactly the same as the Precision Xtra meter. THIS…IS…AWESOME! If you’ve read my latest book Keto Clarity, then you know measuring blood glucose and blood ketones are the most accurate way of knowing how well you are doing in your pursuit of nutritional ketosis. While this ReliOn Ultima meter available at Walmart currently only measures for blood glucose, it’s MUCH cheaper than the cost you would pay for the Precision Xtra meter and blood glucose strips online. In fact, this meter has been next to impossible to purchase in stores before now, so this is true progress in making the blood monitoring much more accessible to those who want it. Now if Walmart can get Abbott to create the ReliOn Ultima blood glucose device to sell in their stores at a cheaper price, how hard would it be for them to make the blood KETONE strips available for this monitor? And the cost of the strip Continue reading >>

Testing For Ketosis

Testing For Ketosis

I was asked in an e-mail about ketosis testing and thought I'd share what I wrote. There's a few ways to check for ketosis. There are at least three types of ketones running around in your body and each of the three most common testing methods tests for a different one. There are Ketostix which you can get from your pharmacist. It's one of the cheaper ways but... it's not terribly accurate. It can be diluted by how much you drink and will often disappear after your body becomes more adapted at using ketones. These test for Acetoacetate. Next is a device called a Ketonix which costs about $120 on Amazon. More initial cost up front but it can be reused over and over again. You just blow into it and it gives you one of four colors to tell how high it's measuring the Acetone in your breath. (blue, green, orange and red) I'd recommend the sport version over the standard version because it gives you more info. In addition to giving you a color it also flashes to tell you how deep into that color you are. i.e. orange that blinks twice is lower than orange blinking 9 times. The third ketone body is beta-hydroxybutyrate. This is the ketone found in blood and is meausred much like testing for blood sugar. In fact I will usually do both these tests off the same finger prick so I don't have to stab myself more often than I have to. This is the most accurate meathod for checking how well you're doing in ketosis. But it is by far the most expensive. The meter I use is a Precision Xtra. It can test for both ketones and blood sugar. The meter itself isn't expensive but the strips are absolute piracy. I've seen them as high as $5 a strip! Shop around online for them if you go this route. I did find them for about $1.50 each here... . That's the bad news. The good news is that you can ge Continue reading >>

Color Of Urine Strips For Ketosis

Color Of Urine Strips For Ketosis

Ketosis occurs when the body runs out of carbohydrates for energy. As a result, the body begins to process dietary and bodily fat to carry out necessary functions; the presence of ketones in urine thus indicates the metabolism of fat. Ketone testing strips evaluate the presence and concentration of ketones using a urine sample. Ketosis is evidenced by the a chemical reaction on the testing pad, which will change colors based on the concentration of ketones. Presence of Ketones The presence of ketones in urine may be surmised by a simple urinary test. Some test strips offer further evaluation of the presence of glucose, proteins or other material in urine. However, in testing for ketosis, strips need only to test for the presence of ketones. Use of Test Strip Urinary ketone test strips (or reagent strips) are simple to use. The testing pad, on one end of the test strip, is exposed to urine; it can be passed through a urine stream or dipped into a urine specimen. The testing pad contains a chemical that reacts in the presence of ketones, changing color depending on concentration. Ketone Readings For utmost accuracy, ketone readings should be conducted exactly 15 seconds after exposure to urine. On the testing bottle will be a small selection of colored squares demonstrating (in ascending order) what colors the test pad will turn in the event that ketones are present. Test Strip Readings Ketone test strips generally have five categories associated with ketone concentration in blood. A negative reading indicates no ketones are present in urine. Trace (5 mg/dL), small (15 mg/dL), moderate (40 mg/dL) and large (80 to 100-plus mg/dL) are the four positive ranges, indicated by a pale pink (trace) through deep burgundy (large) color on the test pad. Accuracy The testing pad may Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Urine Testing Stix

Urine Testing Stix

Human and animal diabetics both use ketostix or ketodiastix. These are reagent indicator strips that test urine for only ketone (ketostix) or for both ketones and glucose (ketodiastix). These stix are available at any brick-and-mortar or Internet pharmacy that sells human diabetic supplies. Stix do expire, so check the unopened expiration date when you buy them and record the date you open them. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use; prolonged exposure to air can produce false negative urine ketone test result.s [1] Wal-Mart and Sam's Club sell a ReliOn branded urine ketone test strip made by Bayer, the maker of Ketostix. [2][3] If the foil-wrapped Ketostix, rather than the ones in vials are purchased, you may find it less wasteful. After the bottle is opened, the remaining unused strips have only a 6 months' life. By using the foil-wrapped ones, you can extend the "life" of your purchase. The singly-wrapped ones can have a unopened expiration date of up to two years. You are then only using what you need when you need it, having the rest still sealed and potent until the indicated expiration date. [4] You should test your pet's urine for ketones for the reasons discussed at ketones. You may test your pet's urine for glucose because you've been instructed to do so by the vet as a method of gauging regulation or your pet is undiagnosed and you want to determine whether there is hyperglycemia. Some reasons for preferring testing glucose levels by using blood over urine testing is that the urine used in testing may have been in the bladder for hours. Because of this, it may not be a reliable indicator of what systemic glucose levels are at the time of testing. [5] What's seen when testing urine for glucose is an average of what the level of glucose has been over a Continue reading >>

Ketone Strips: Are They Legit?

Ketone Strips: Are They Legit?

These days, everyone is a keto dieter, but very few actually know they’re in ketosis. Sure, you can follow the diet and take the supplements, but if it’s all predicated on reaching a certain metabolic condition, wouldn’t you want to know if you’ve achieved it? Ketone strips fall into two distinct categories that dictate the accuracy of the test you are taking. These two categories are urine and blood. The degree to which ketone strips help you to successfully monitor your blood ketone levels will be greatly affected by which of these you use. Think of a urinalysis as the book jacket version, and a blood test as the entire Moby Dick novel in regard to detail. Depending where you are on the commitment scale, you’ll want to make sure you’re using the right test for your needs. Below, we’ve listed the various types, brands, and benefits/detriments of each of the ketone strips. Check them out, and see which one suits your needs best, and most importantly, helps you remain in ketosis. Ketone Strips: Urine Analysis Using urinalysis to test for ketones is simply getting a “30,000 foot view” of the ketones in your system. The body regularly emits anywhere from 3 to 15 milligrams of ketones a day. Increased amounts of ketones in the urine (acetoacetate) can show you that there is in fact an excess of ketones your system, however ketone strips that evaluate the urine will not report the amount of ketones in the blood – ketonaemia – which is where the real work is done. The benefit of using the urinalysis ketone strips at the beginning of your ketogenic diet, is that you’ll save money of the bat in case you choose not to pursue the diet later on. And, as your body initially gets into ketosis, you’ll find value in the measurements. But once your body adapts Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Urine For Ketones

How To Test Your Urine For Ketones

Are you on a diet where part of the goal is to be "in ketosis"? Some diets, such as the Atkins Diet, recommend testing to find out whether your body is generating ketones. The easiest and least expensive way to do this is to test your urine using Ketostix or a similar testing strip. Although it is not the most accurate method, it can be helpful for home testing, especially when you're new to a ketogenic diet. Testing can be a useful way to tell if you are eating something that is higher in carbohydrate than you realized. Since different people will be in nutritional ketosis with different amounts of carbohydrate (and sometimes protein), it can provide information to help you individualize your diet. It also provides motivation to stay in ketosis. Two Notes About Testing for Ketones Diabetics testing ketone levels to check for ketoacidosis will interpret the reading much differently than someone on a ketogenic diet who desires higher levels of ketones. A reduced-carb diet does not have to be ketogenic to be helpful. Many studies of non-ketogenic low-carb diets have been found to have many benefits. How to Use Ketone Testing Strips In order to test your urine, you will need ketone urine testing strips. There are many brands available, such as Ketostix and Chemstrip. The name "Ketostix" is often used to refer to any ketone testing strip, no matter the manufacturer. When you're ready to test, follow these steps: You can either pass the test end of the strip through your urine as you urinate (be sure to wet it entirely), or collect urine in a clean, dry container and dip the test strip in. Shake off excess drops of urine. Wait for 15 seconds or whatever time is stated on the brand of test strips you are using. Compare the color on your strip to the color array on the side of Continue reading >>

Cheaper Alternatives To Blood Ketone Testing

Cheaper Alternatives To Blood Ketone Testing

I’ve had a couple readers reach out to me asking if there were any cheaper alternatives to blood ketone testing. My most recent check on Amazon.com shows the Precision Xtra Blood Ketone strips going for a whopping $4-$5 per strip, although as you see from the picture above, some places exorbitantly charge up to $9.99 per strip! This post is my attempt to go through some of the cheaper options that are available if you’ve decided that tracking ketones is important to your goals but you can’t afford the cost of these strips. The current gold standard for measuring how deeply in ketosis you are at home is still the Precision Xtra Blood Ketone monitoring system, and you already know how pricey this is. Unfortunately if accuracy on a moment to moment basis is important to you, there’s no way around it: this is your only option. To lessen the cost burden, you can do some online searches to see if you can find a better deal, although your mileage may vary depending on the legitimacy of the site. Some reputable options I’ve come across are: Ebay – You can sometimes get them for as cheap as $3 – 3.50 per strip, although it’s important to pay attention to the expiration date. Sometimes these go for cheaper because they’re expired or near expiration. If you’re ok with that, then have at it. Universal Drug Store – This Canadian pharmacy is where I typically pick mine up. They used to sell it for around $1.99 per strip, but have since raised the price to $2.30 per strip. Depending on how comfortable you are with ordering from across the border, this could be a good option. If your order is over $100, shipping is free. A drawback is that they don’t accept Visa or Mastercard, so make sure you have your American Express handy. Canada Drugs – Another Canadian p Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver breaks down fat to produce ketones. Ketones, on a ketogenic diet, are the primary fuel source for the body. If you’re new to the ketogenic diet and you still have questions, consider reading our Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Keto > There are three main ways to measure the ketones in your body, all of which have their advantages and disadvantages. The most common ways to measure are: Blood Ketone Meter. Very accurate but the strips are extremely expensive. Breath Ketone Meters. More accurate than the urine strips, but can sometimes vary in accuracy. Cheaper than blood strips in the long-run. Urine Stricks. This will answer the question “Am I in ketosis?” but will not provide an accurate measure of blood ketones. Scroll down to read a more in-depth analysis of each, and what we recommend for you. Measuring Ketones with Urine Sticks Urine sticks will always be the cheapest and easiest way to measure ketosis. For beginners, this should cover everything you need – there is no point in getting more complex blood strips so early on when you are still trying to understand the nuances of a ketogenic diet. Ultimately, keto sticks are very easy to use – you hold the sticks in your urine stream for a few seconds, and within 10-15 seconds you should notice a color change in the strip (if you are in ketosis). The color of the stick typically is measured in red: light pink being low in ketone production and dark purple being high in ketone production. While keto sticks can be ideal for a general answer to the question “Am I in ketosis?”, they aren’t precise with their accuracy. They measure the acetoacetate in your urine, which is an unused ketone by the body. As you get deeper into ketosis and your body adapts, your b Continue reading >>

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