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Reintroducing Carbs After Ketosis

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

I had a question for anyone who had gone VLC or Keto and then decided to add fruit or sweet potato back in. I bloat when I eat carbs (possible intolerance?) and am wondering if this could be a simple adaptation period or if you can actually create carb intolerance by going VLC for a longer period of time? I am a semi professional athlete training twice per day, and am thinking of adding more carbs to help with recovery (I am very sore and it is starting to affect sleep). 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Thoughts and experiences? Continue reading >>

Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling And Overtraining

Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling And Overtraining

“My training, racing, and health were all great… until I crashed.” For athletes, it’s not uncommon for the transition to a ketogenic diet from a standard high-carbohydrate diet to look something like this: Take all the carbs out of your diet, cold-turkey - feel awful… Build the metabolic machinery to burn fat more efficiently - feel great! Suddenly, out of nowhere - crash. Like a rollercoaster, you went from feeling terrible to feeling on top of the world, and then back to feeling terrible. The question is “why the crash??” You think: maybe I just need to do a few more fasted training sessions each week. Or, maybe I need to drop my carbs from 30 grams per day to 20 grams per day (broccoli just has too many carbs)... Nope. You might just need to train less and eat more. Still here? Good. This is part one of a series of articles examining potential reasons why a ketogenic diet may fail to produce the expected benefits. Regardless of whether things are just now starting to go downhill, or you never saw results in the first place, the most important step is recognizing that something isn’t right. Getting into nutritional ketosis is one thing, but just because you’re registering 2.0mmol/L on the blood ketone meter doesn’t mean the diet is working for you. Ultimately, performance and health are the goals, and they may or may not coincide with high blood ketones. There are many aspects of life as an endurance athlete that must be accounted for in the equation of optimal health and performance. The most important one that we regularly see is people struggling on a ketogenic diet because they’re underfueling and overtraining. So that’s where we’ll begin! Ultimately, performance and health are the goals, and they may or may not coincide with high blood k Continue reading >>

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

If you are eating a carb-restricted diet, sooner or later, no matter how much weight you've lost or how well controlled your blood sugar has become, you are going to run into the carby treat with your name on it, and when that happens, chances are you're going to eat it. What happens next may be the single most important moment in your diet. Are you going to be taken by surprise by normal physiological changes that occur? Will you start the three month binge-from-hell that leaves you wallowing in self-hatred while you pack on all the weight you lost and more? Or will you use the experience of going off-plan to strengthen your long-term diet success? The choice is up to you. Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking When you boost your carbs above the low carbing threshold--the specific amount varies from person to person--two things will happen. You will become hungry and you will immediately gain a startling amount of weight. The reasons for your sudden weight gain are explained here. Why Carb Intake Causes Hunger Cravings The hunger is a bit more complicated, especially since it may not kick in right after you eat the carbohydrates that send you off-plan but may take a day or two to develop--when you are eating low carb again. If you experience intense hungers immediately after you eat your first carby meal, the explanation is this: After you have been low carbing for a while, your body stops producing some of the enzymes needed to digest complex starches and sugars. It takes a day or two for these to ramp back up. But in meantime, when you eat carbohydrates your blood sugar may go up a lot higher than it normally would, even if you don't usually have blood sugar problems. This is why some researchers have reported that low carbing can actually cause insulin Continue reading >>

Episode 55: What To Expect When Adding Carbs Back Into Your Diet

Episode 55: What To Expect When Adding Carbs Back Into Your Diet

Thanks for joining us for episode 55 of The Ancestral RD podcast. If you want to keep up with our podcasts, subscribe in iTunes and never miss an episode! Remember, please send us your question if you’d like us to answer it on the show! Today we are answering the following question from a listener: “Hi ladies. I’ve been listening to your advice about eating more carbs. For the past few years with Paleo, I’ve definitely been under eating carbs unintentionally. My question is, what is normal to expect with transitioning to a more moderate carb diet? I have a lot more energy and better bowel movements, but I am also having a lot of abdominal pain and bloating. This is a noticeable increase since a lower carb diet. My typical carb intake in a day is white potato or acorn squash with breakfast, chia seed pudding with banana/berries for a snack, potato again with lunch, sweet potato with dinner, and fruit with nuts in the evening, plus lots of non-starchy veggies. I’m a group fitness instructor and quite active. P.S. I’m in Canada and just got accepted to a dietetic internship. Can’t wait to be a real food RD!” Are you experiencing bloating or other digestive discomfort when adding carbs back into your diet after a period of restriction? Don’t throw in the towel just yet! Many people experience some degree of gut issues when adding foods back into their diet. Often times these symptoms are not a sign that you need to keep avoiding the food, but rather a common occurrence when reintroducing foods. The good news is that the majority of the time the symptoms are only temporary as your body readjusts to eating a healthy variety of foods again. We have been learning that restrictive diets may not be so good for us after all. Listen today as we discuss the consequ Continue reading >>

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Via Spanish Caravan, a frequent commenter with let’s just say a “medical background.” ~~~ Physiological Insulin Resistatnce (PIR) results from glucose deficiency the same way mucin deficiency induces dry eyes, nostrils, colon and anemia like symptoms. They’re both ways of preserving glucose for your brain. When you VLC, your muscles become insulin resistant to preserve your glucose for the brain. So while your muscles are running on fatty acids, they become insulin resistant. This leaves glucose for your brain but the net result is your BG going up as you’re “physiologically” insulin resistant. There doesn’t really seem to a problem with this state, as there is with mucin deficiency; it’s not known to induce diabetes or make prediabetics diabetic. At least not according to those who advocate VLCing. I have a feeling however, that this is a disease-prone state. The effects of low carbohydrate diets on insulin sensitivity depend on what is used to replace the dietary carbohydrate, and the nature of the subjects studied. Dietary carbohydrates may affect insulin action, at least in part, via alterations in plasma free fatty acids. In normal subjects a high-carbohydrate/low-GI breakfast meal reduced free fatty acids by reducing the undershoot of plasma glucose, whereas low-carbohydrate breakfasts increased postprandial free fatty acids. Why is it disease-prone? Because high serum free fatty acids are implicated in various disease states, especially immune related (and also diabetes in some cases). High serum FFA and very low trigs that we see among those who VLC are associated with nascent autoimmunity, especially rheumatic autoimmunity. See: Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders. We’re talking about triglycer Continue reading >>

When To Introduce Carbs Back Into Your Diet

When To Introduce Carbs Back Into Your Diet

The subject of when to introduce carbs back into your diet is often a tricky one. I know that people want clear and defined answers but as always with the “artisan craft” that is body composition improvement (it is both a skill that needs to be learned and studied, but also something that requires experience and a feel that cannot simply be picked up from a textbook) there cannot be a one size fits all response. It is one of the countless reasons why I am not an endorser of standard meal plans and I recently made this comment on twitter that I think neatly encapsulates my own position: “A sample meal plan is as valid as me giving you directions to the gym as if you were leaving from my house and not your own! #BeatTheBS Caveats of individuality aside, there are of course some general guidelines and principles that underpin when I would advise someone to look to introduce carbs back into the diet and we will address those later on in this post. I do just want to take a quick time out however and remind you that introducing carbs back into the diet suggests a preceding period of ultra low carbs. I have no problem with some people dieting on ultra low carbs, we have had a lot of success with modifying this approach with countless UP personal training clients, but always remember that minimal carb intake doesn’t work for everyone, that most people feel a bit rough when they switch from running on carbs to running on protein and fat, and that you shouldn’t fall into the all too common dieter’s habit of dropping carbs and (good) fats at the same time. Doing that is setting yourself up for failure on a grand scale as the energy intake will fall too low, you will starve, find the diet impossible to follow, and almost certainly disrupt the hormones you require for th Continue reading >>

6 Easy Steps For Reintroducing Carbs Without Gaining Weight

6 Easy Steps For Reintroducing Carbs Without Gaining Weight

Have you tried a ketogenic diet and discovered it's not the right diet for you? Me too! Maybe, you've arrived at the Atkins pre-maintenance phase, Phase 3, and are now feeling a bit timid about returning carbs to your diet. This article will help you, too. Either way, reintroducing carbs doesn't mean you have to settle for weight regain. While you do have to be mindful, here's the 6 easy steps I used to reintroduce carbs after leaving ketosis. A traditional low-carb diet is very restrictive. Most plans require you to lower your carbohydrates to less than 50 net carbs per day. Some people enjoy eating mostly protein foods and vegetables, and some do not because along with lowering those carbohydrates, most low-carb plans don't let you eat potatoes, rice, bread, or other starchy foods -- even at higher carb levels. Many people begin missing those higher carb foods, especially if you've never adapted to burning fat for fuel or the weight isn't coming off as easily as you thought it would. While you can always adapt your low-carb meal plan to fit your preferences, most people don't know how to do that. If you used low carb as a temporary, lose-weight-quick solution, you might have discovered that body fat doesn't go away any faster than it does on other diet plans. This can be quite frustrating! The frustration increases even more if you don't have the genetics to easily burn fats for fuel, or you have health conditions that interfere with fat burning. If so, you just won't feel well eating at very low carb levels. No matter what your reasons are for leaving ketosis behind, you have probably found carbohydrate restriction to not be sustainable long term. While some people feel better eating at very low-carb levels, others do not. Regardless of what most low carbers believe, Continue reading >>

Targeted Ketogenic Diet: An In-depth Look

Targeted Ketogenic Diet: An In-depth Look

The Targeted Ketogenic Diet (TKD), simply put, is nothing more than a regular keto diet – with the exception of eating carbs around your workout times. That means any day you exercise, you will be consuming carbohydrates. If your goal is still fat loss, make sure to include the extra calories from the carbs in your totals. Assuming that you ARE reading this because you exercise, this means that fewer fats should be consumed on these days. Benefits of a TKD The TKD is a “compromise” between a Standard Ketogenic Diet and a Cyclical Ketogenic Diet, meaning that you can still perform high intensity activity, but you won’t have to be out of ketosis for long periods of time. For most people’s purposes, TKD can withstand performance in high intensity exercise – although not as well as CKD. It’s most appropriate for beginner or intermediate strength trainers or for those who cannot use a CKD diet for health reasons. As of now, there are no studies out that will show the limitations of weight training based on low sources of blood glucose. There are studies that give carbs prior to resistance and strength training, but have not found increased performance over the long run. However, many SKD keto-ers report strength and endurance improvements in high intensity environments if they consume pre-workout carbs. Most people that are involved in anaerobic training on an SKD typically report improved performance with pre-workout carbs. The problem is that SKDs can even be as limiting to low intensity exercise performance due to the limited glucose and muscle glycogen. If you’re an athlete, or in the process of training, I recommend that you experiment with carbohydrates around your training. Although performance increase is a great benefit of a TKD, it is not the primar Continue reading >>

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The “rule of thumb” for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not “net”): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Fat: to satiety Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right — an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK — but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get “into” ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. I’m a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one per Continue reading >>

Getting Off Your Low-carb Diet Without Gaining Weight

Getting Off Your Low-carb Diet Without Gaining Weight

As predicted, many people are growing tired of #low-carb diets because, like all diets, they have a low long-term success rate, offer little variety and — well, I guess people miss carbs. But the truth is that you can continue to lose weight, or maintain the weight you lost on your low-carb #diet, if you follow a few simple rules. PATIENCE You’re not going to lose weight as quickly when you go off your low-carb diet, and, in fact, you might actually gain a few pounds at first. “Don’t freak out. When you start #eating healthy carbs, you may gain some water weight, because some of the weight you originally lost was water, especially in the intro stages,” says Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., senior clinical nutritionist at New York University Medical Center in New York City. How long do you have to give yourself to adjust? “Give it about three to four weeks,” suggests Dawn Jackson, R.D., L.D., of Northwestern Memorial Wellness Institute and a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. DON’T GO WHITE One of the biggest mistakes low-carb dieters make is going back to the white stuff. It’s very easy to overindulge in empty-calorie foods, such as cookies, cakes, white bread, potatoes and pasta. “And white carbs are also convenient — too convenient! — available at every turn: in the vending machine, the open box in the pantry, as side orders in restaurants,” explains nutritionist Molly Kimball, M.S., R.D., of the Ochsner Clinic Foundation in New Orleans. Instead, make sure your starchy carbs come from whole grains. “When you reintroduce carbs, the whole grains give you a more consistent release of energy, whereas eating foods with refined white flour or sugar may make you hungry sooner,” says Heller. Whole grains have a high fiber content, whi Continue reading >>

Losing Weight By Giving Up Carbohydrates

Losing Weight By Giving Up Carbohydrates

Last August, a routine physical left me surprised. I learned that I had gained 20lbs since college, roughly 40% of which came in the last year. I had an exercise routine, I walked a lot, and I thought I ate well. I didn’t think I felt or looked noticeably fatter, but the data doesn’t lie. This was not the “up-and-to-the-right” graph that I like. In retrospect, I think I indulged in the free sweetened drinks and desserts at work a little too much. It was clearly time for a dietary change. At the time several of my coworkers were espousing the virtues of a keto diet, one that significantly reduces carbohydrate intake and replaces it with fats and protein. The overly simplified premise is that consumption carbohydrates spike secretion of insulin, and insulin is responsible for fat storage. By eliminating the carbohydrates, there is significantly less fat storage. Without carbs, the body goes into a state of ketosis where it uses ketones for fuel. Ketones are from the breakdown from fat stores when there’s not enough glucose. This causes weight loss and a variety of metabolic improvements. I’m missing a lot of detail, of course, but this is the gist of it. The TL;DR: I lost 15lbs in 2 months by giving up carbohydrates. Then 5lbs more in the months that followed. After my first couple days, I experienced the “keto flu”, the uncomfortable transition of entering ketosis. I had a headache, felt lethargic, and endured a stomach cramp, but the symptoms only lasted for a day. I didn’t see any weight improvements after a week, but after two, the improvements were noticeable. I’ve heard people who claim that this diet gave them more energy, and they felt sharper, etc. Mentally, the only change I noticed was that I would wake up quicker and feel less bleary-eyed. Continue reading >>

Cheating And You

Cheating And You

Cheating, or eating hidden carbs, whatever you want to call it. Let’s have a brief talk. What is cheating? Cheating is, in the most simple terms, eating a lot more carbs than you would normally. There’s no hard and fast figure, suffice to say that if you had somewhere in the realm of 50g – 100g you would likely break your ketosis, but it wouldn’t be the end of the world. It also stands to reason that you would possibly not have to go through unpleasant keto-flu again. How does it happen? Cheating can happen for a number of reasons, but there seem to be two main causes. Emotions Alcohol Comfort eating is something everyone I know does, and I’ll admit to eating an entire pint of Ben & Jerry’s on my own, no problems at all, when feeling down. Though those days are also long gone. You could be stressed, sad, angry, or any number of other things, and may choose to seek comfort in sugary foods. After all, they raise your mood, though it’s only short term. You’ll probably feel down that you’ve stalled your progress or simply eaten foods that aren’t great for your body. You might even drink alcohol for a range of the same reasons, or, as is very often the case, it may be a social event. A birthday, after work drinks, oh how I could go on… One thing’s for sure, too much can and will impair judgement. The last time I cheated was definitely after a few refreshments and I said “Hey, you know what, chocolate is a GREAT IDEA!” But it wasn’t really. You’ll Feel Like a Failure – But that’s OK! The worst part is knowing that you’ve failed, but you must remember that it’s ok to fail, if you don’t, then you’re probably not doing a lot of trying or learning. I recently read some great advice on failing. It stressed one point, and one point only, Continue reading >>

How To Eat Carbs After Low-carb Dieting

How To Eat Carbs After Low-carb Dieting

Low-carb dieting is a great way to lose weight quickly and get that super-lean conditioning that is necessary for a competition-winning physique. However, adding carbs back to the diet after a stint of low-carb dieting can cause a "yo-yo" effect if done too fast or incorrectly. Carbs can cause the body to overcompensate by storing large amounts of body fat. Follow a few simple guidelines to prevent gaining weight after low-carb dieting. Video of the Day Add carbohydrates to the diet slowly. For example, a typical low-carb diet involves eating 30 to 50g of carbs a day for five days, then carb-loading 100 to 200g for one or two days. Try adding 30g extra carbs a day for the first week, without loading carbohydrates on the sixth and seventh day of the week. Stick to low-glycemic carbs. Eating high-glycemic carbs causes a huge spike in insulin, which could quickly trigger body fat storage. Instead, eat oatmeal, brown rice, whole-grain breads and pastas and fresh fruit. Avoid carb binges to prevent fast weight gain. Time your carbs to further discourage them from being stored as body fat. For example, add your carbs to a pre- or post-workout meal, when they are less likely to be used for fat storage. Or, take most of your carbs in during the day when they will be burned for energy. Avoid large amounts of carbs close to bedtime. Drop your dietary fats to keep calories stabilized. You may have added extra fats to your diet while on your low-carb regimen. When they add carbs back, the hike in calories is sufficient to cause weight gain. Do not cut your healthy fats completely--just cut down your fat intake, especially saturated fats. You can also stagger your meals by alternating between healthy fat and protein and low-glycemic carbs and protein. Continue to have one cheat meal Continue reading >>

Carb Reloading

Carb Reloading

Guest post written by: Sarah Strange I’d like to share with you my recent journey out of the low carb maze, which I’ve been more or less stuck in since 2010. My initial launch into Paleo started off like most people’s as a 30 day reset 4 years ago. I fell for Robb’s used car salesman pitch and gave it a shot. I felt so great and I liked it so much that it’s still going on today and now I even work for the guy! Imagine that! When I started this whole thing, I consciously decided that I wanted to try no starches or fruit for the 30 days, really only because I found it interesting (thanks Vilhjamur Stefansson) and wanted to see what would happen. I’m curious that way. I was having amazing results at 30 days, so I extended it to 60. Then I planned on reintroducing starches and fruit, and including them regularly from then on forward. I tried… but it didn’t go so well. I was a little surprised. (I wish I was smart enough to turn that “and then I got high” song into something that would cleverly explain what I was going through every time I tried to bring the carbs back in, but I know my talents and rappin’ ain’t one.) Basically, trying to eat modest, normal amounts of fruits and starches sucked for me. It seemed to reverse all of the joy and warm fuzzy feelings from my initial Paleo high. I’d experience a whole grab bag of symptoms: joint inflammation (I have some creaky worn out business from all the ballet and hypermobility plus carpal tunnel), 5lb’s of instant water retention, wicked PMS… and I mean every symptom there was, aaand weight gain- which was always hard to gauge with the stupid water retention, but when I’d return to low carb and shed the water there was some undeniable extra weight. I wasn’t in freak out mode about it I just t Continue reading >>

What Is A Keto Diet? (the Ketogenic Diet 101)

What Is A Keto Diet? (the Ketogenic Diet 101)

The Ketogenic Diet (also known as Keto) has gone mainstream, leaving many people (including me!) asking: What is a Keto Diet? After all, you’re seeing ripped bodybuilders, figure competitors, and even normal men and women who just lead busy lives shed massive amounts of weight through this things called Keto. What is it? Why do it? Is it sustainable? What are the benefits? What are the downsides? These, and many more questions, I’m going to answer in this article, so if you’re asking “what is a keto diet?” you will have all the information you need to decide if a Ketogenic Diet is for you, you’ll have all the tools you need to get started. Related Reading: How I lost 23 pounds & 20 inches in 60 days of Keto What Is A Ketogenic Diet? A Ketogenic Diet, also know as the Keto Diet, is a very high fat, very low carb, moderate protein diet that is very popular because it can cause you to lose body fat very fast, and study after study after study has linked Keto with benefits against cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more. Eating Ketogenically involves cutting carbohydrate intake from 200-300g daily down to 20-50g daily and replacing those missing carbs with fat. Reducing carbohydrates this drastically puts your body in a state of Ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which you body uses fat for fuel, rather than carbohydrates. When you eat normally, when you consume more carbohydrates than you body needs to run for the next 24 hours or so, you body turns those excess carbs into fat and stores them as (unwanted) body fat. But if you cut the carbs in your diet drastically, your body enters Ketosis and starts burning that stored fat for fuel, resulting in better health and body composition for you. 4 Types of Ketogenic Diets Cutting your carbs sounds Continue reading >>

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