diabetestalk.net

Really Cold In Ketosis

Pruvit Keto Os Review

Pruvit Keto Os Review

I'm Mike and I've been a personal trainer for over 10 years and I first heard about ketosis way back before it was even a big thing. I've been more or less on the ketogenic diet full-time ever since. When Keto-OS came out, people had been talking about Keto-OS being the go-to product for quickly getting into ketosis and even allowing you to cheat. Me being a skeptic, I set out on a 3 month strict review project, to get to the bottom of whether or not Keto-OS actually works. After months of testing blood samples and body calibrations, I am about to give you the conclusion of what I found from my review down below. KETO OS is the latest product from Pruvit and stands for "Ketone Operating System." This product is an exogenous ketone drink, which means it may provide a multitude of benefits, ranging from athletic performance enhancement, more efficient weight loss, cancer prevention, cognitive improvement and anti-inflammatory properties, among other things. Its ability to essentially trick the body into burning fat instead of carbs (a state known as ketosis) can also result in more rapid weight loss than you may have thought possible. This is what Pruvit had to say: Keto-OS is your “ketone operating system”. It was one of the First Therapeutic Ketone Supplements on the market. The proprietary blend is owned by Prüvit and is Dr. Approved, Lab Tested, University backed and the technology in Keto-OS is patent pending, developed by one of the most world renown Dr.’s and experts on Ketosis. Prüvit was the first company approved by University of South Florida to acquire the sub-license rights to use this patent pending technology. It is a powder that you mix with 8=10 oz. of water. Keto-OS is Pruvit’s flagship product and is the first product the company sold when it Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Might Be The Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It?

The Ketogenic Diet Might Be The Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It?

Here's what you need to know about the high-fat, low-carb diet everyone's talking about. Google has released the top search terms of 2016, and when it comes to weight loss, it turns out folks were especially drawn to the ketogenic diet. It was one of the 10 most-searched diets this year, landing halfway down the list (just a few notches below the taco cleanse!). But if you weren't among the keto-curious in the last 12 months, you're probably wondering now, Is this something I should try? (And what does ketogenic mean again?) Read on for a quick primer on the plan, and my bottom-line advice. What is the ketogenic diet? In a nutshell, it's a high-fat, low- to moderate-protein, low-carb eating plan. On a ketogenic diet, roughly 75% to 90% of daily calories come from fat; 6% to 20% come from protein; and 2% to 5% come from carbohydrates. It was originally devised as a tool for controlling epileptic seizures (though doctors aren't exactly sure how it works) before there were drugs to treat seizures. In the past few decades, it has reemerged as patients and parents seek alternatives to pharmaceuticals. But the ketogenic diet has also been adopted as a weight loss plan. The goal of the diet is to achieve ketosis, a state in which the body is using fat as its primary fuel, rather than carbs. After three to four days on a ketogenic diet, back-up stores of carbohydrates, called glycogen, become depleted and ketosis kicks in, triggering some weight loss and the appearance of a leaner physique. But in terms of dropping pounds, the primary advantage of a ketogenic diet is that it doesn't leave you hungry, since it involves eating a good deal of satiating fats, and the state of ketosis has been shown to reduce appetite. What does the research say? A recent Spanish study tracked 20 ob Continue reading >>

Why Do I Feel Weak On The Ketogenic Diet?

Why Do I Feel Weak On The Ketogenic Diet?

The Mayo Clinic's R.M. Wilder, M.D., developed the ketogenic diet in the 1920s as a cure for epileptic seizures in children. While conventional medicine now is used to control most cases of epilepsy, the ketogenic diet still is used as an alternative treatment when conventional medicines do not have the intended effect. As the ketogenic diet consists of high amounts of fat, it can deprive the body of essential vitamins and minerals and also can give rise to mood disorders and weight loss. Video of the Day The ketogenic diet consists in extremely low levels of carbohydrates, adequate amounts of protein and high levels of fat. As carbohydrates are the main source of blood sugar, or glucose, this composition of food lowers blood sugar levels significantly. Most cells in the body do not need glucose to thrive. Muscle cells, for example, can use fat or protein. Brain cells, however, cannot use fat or protein as an energy source. When glucose levels are low, it switches to ketone bodies, a byproduct of fat metabolism in the liver. As ketone bodies are an efficient fuel source, their metabolism requires additional mitochondria, or cell engines. These additional mitrochondria stabilize neurons and prevent overexcitement of the kind that can lead to seizures. Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency Vitamins and minerals are essential for body growth, cell repair and metabolism. The main source of vitamins and minerals is vegetables, fruits and legumes. As vegetables, fruits and legumes are moderately high in carbohydrates, you can eat them only in small amounts if you follow the ketogenic diet. Without a vitamin and mineral supplement, the body quickly gets deprived of vitamins and minerals. This can lead to fatigue and muscle weakness. According to Judith Wurtman, director of the Adara Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Cold Hands

Ketosis And Cold Hands

Just trying an experiment and I am 3 days into a ketogenic diet. Planning on sticking with if for 30-60 days and longer if I dig it. So I know it is "normal" to have cold hands in ketosis but I had two questions - 1- What is the cause/mechanism behind this? 2 - For those who have been keto for a long-time, with NO re-feeds does this go away after adaptation? Edit - This is not a starvation diet, I am not significantly hypo-caloric, I am not suffering from a disease and I am not looking for a diagnosis. At 75gm + I have warm hands no matter what. On a ketogenic diet, so far, I feel great and am having no issues other than my hands being cold (not numb). Due dilagence on google shows this is common in Ketosis. However, it doesn't say A - Why people in ketosis have this symptom or B - Whether this symptom abates as keto-adaptation occurs. So for those who have been keto- or are keto- do you have this? Did it go away? Is there any study or consensus on the cause. For instance - Light-headedness on Keto- is almost always related to Potassium and Sodium issues. That is the sort of data I am asking about. Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Are In Ketosis

7 Signs You Are In Ketosis

The Ketogenic Diet (also known as “keto”) has been all over social media. You’ve probably seen ripped fitness models claiming that Keto gave them their physique, and the even more inspiration stories of normal people like you and me, who lost weight and reclaimed their lives through this diet called Keto. If you’re not sure what the Ketogenic Diet is, head on over to What is a Keto Diet? (Ketogenic Diet 101). Over there I’ve detailed what exactly Keto is and isn’t, given you meal plans, snacks, and answered all of your questions about the diet. But let’s say you’ve jumped into Keto with both feet, and now you want to know “Is this working?” I don’t blame you. It can be hard to tell what’s going on inside your body. Are you in Ketosis? Are you eating few enough carbs? Are you shedding fat? Well, there are 7 obvious ways to tell if you’re in ketosis, without testing your blood or urine. Here are the signs you’re in Ketosis: 1. Weight Loss Weight loss is the first and most obvious sign that you’re in ketosis. The weight loss happens for a variety of reasons, but it’s important to note that it’s very fast in the beginning. This is because when you switch to a low-carb diet, your muscles start losing water. Carbohydrates are what bind water to your muscles, so when you’re not eating carbohydrates, your muscles start dumping them, and the attached water. That’s one of the things that causes Keto Flu (which you can read about in Keto 101), but drinking plenty of water and keeping your salt intake up will keep you hydrated and feeling healthy. After the initial water leaving your body, then you’ll start to see steady fat loss. Related Reading: My 60 Day Keto Challenge Results (I lost 23 pounds!) 2. Little or No Appetite When you stop eati Continue reading >>

Tips For Burning More Fat With Cold Thermogenesis (and Why Icing Really Does Work).

Tips For Burning More Fat With Cold Thermogenesis (and Why Icing Really Does Work).

As I write today’s post, I have just finished my usual 5 minute morning cold shower, followed by 10 minutes of morning yoga in my chilly backyard – and I’m currently wearing a cool fat burner vest. I may be no Wim Hof (the “Iceman”, who is pictured above and featured in videos like this), but this type of cold exposure has become a morning ritual for me, and I typically do it in a fasted state – trying to accumulate at least 45-60 minutes of “goose bumps” in the AM. Compared to doing a rigorous morning workout in a fasted state, this kind of cold thermogenesis achieves a similar fat burning effect, but is less stressful on my body and joints than exercise – and let’s face it: I can’t exactly write this article while I’m riding a bike, but I certainly can while wearing an ice-packed vest. And lately, my chilly adventures don’t stop with morning cold exposure… Later today, following my afternoon workout, I’ll go shut down post-workout inflammation and rapidly cool my core by jumping in the nearby 56 degree Spokane river for a 15-20 minute soak while I catch up on my daily dose of NPR’s “Science Friday” podcast. So why do I expose my body to this kind of treatment, and what are the benefits? You’re about to find out, see 3 things I’ve been using to enhance cold thermogenesis, and also get a glimpse into why the argument that “icing doesn’t work” is complete bunk. If you listened to my interview with Jack Kruse about cold thermogenesis, then you know that we discussed a host of benefits from frequent cold exposure done the right way, such as: Lowering body fat Increasing hormone levels Improving sexual performance and fertility Lowering blood sugar Cutting food cravings Improving adrenal function Fixing thyroid issues Enhancing Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Snacks Easy And Delicious Pumpkin Bars

Ketogenic Diet Snacks Easy And Delicious Pumpkin Bars

Home Articles Recipes Ketogenic Diet Snacks Easy and Delicious Pumpkin Bars Ketogenic Diet Snacks Easy and Delicious Pumpkin Bars Ketogenic Diet Snacks Easy and Delicious Pumpkin Bars You know the keto diet basics and have your meal plan, but no matter how well you eateveryone feels a little snackish at times. As the weather gets colder, its natural to crave the one thing that truly signifies cold weather: Pumpkin Spice! Very often, when feeling a craving for sweets, its not so much a hunger youre trying to curb, but a feeling youre trying to fulfill. This time of year, with pumpkin spice all around, is especially hard! Its natural to be feeling a bit like youre missing out because everything is dripping with pumpkin and sugar. To help, we went off and found the perfect Ketogenic Diet Pumpkin snacks to give you that warm fuzzy feeling without the carbs ! First, youll need a little pumpkin pie spice:a blend of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves, combined to invoke that unmistakable feeling of fall is here. This mixture of spices can be added to some of your favorite Keto Diet Recipes to give it the pumpkin spice twist, These delicious small bites of pumpkin pie, topped with vanilla, will have you wishing for the holidays year-round. These are a great addition to any holiday party or cold weather meal. Joel Marion enjoys a Healthy Fat Bomb for a snack on his 14 Day Keto Challenge program to keep energy levels high and hunger at bay. Fat Bombs help maintain acceptable ketone levels to allow your body burn off the most stubborn belly fat. With only 1g carb per serving, these are the perfect guilt-free pumpkin spice treats. Eat these for a quick breakfast, paired with coffee sprinkled with your pumpkin pie spice. These are a great way to satisfy a sweet tooth during the d Continue reading >>

Runketo.com: Guide To Cold Turkey Ketosis: How To Start A Ketogenic Diet.

Runketo.com: Guide To Cold Turkey Ketosis: How To Start A Ketogenic Diet.

Guide to Cold Turkey Ketosis: How to Start a Ketogenic Diet. If you are expecting improved athletic performance you will need to be patient. I would recommend not exercising at all in your first week of low carb. Anthony: " I would strongly recommend working out during your first week as I feel it helps speed up the process. You have to be able to keep your ego out of it. " Dan: "I was a little hesitant about jumping in, so I went low carb first. Honestly, I had such bad eating habits, it took me a month to wean off hot dogs and Atkins bars. Stayed at 100g for that first month or so . . . but if you factor in 'net carbs,' I was probably much lower. Also I did not use keto strips for the first month, so I do not know if I was in ketosis or not, let alone fully understand it. There was only one day where I felt funny or dizzy, I drank water and it went away instantly - a bit dehydrated I guess? So never really experienced the 'Keto Flu.' The second month it started to just click, my food choices improved and my carb intake was cut in half. I also went low carb while recovering from an injury, so I wasn't planning on training anyways. I did not work out for the first two weeks and still lost about 12 pounds." Here is my first run in ketosis: Anthony: " Suplement with MCT oil / coconut oil to help get through the rough spots. " In addition to the possibility of exacerbating the low carb flu there is the chance of demoralizing yourself with sub par workouts. With your extra time make sure you read, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance by Phinney and Volek. As the foremost authority on the subject Dr. Phinney made the following case to me in an email for a quick transition into ketosis: Point #1. It takes most people at least three weeks of staying under 50 gr Continue reading >>

Diet Talk: Ketogenic Diet - Freezing!

Diet Talk: Ketogenic Diet - Freezing!

I started the ketogenic diet to get rid of the last few pounds and just experiment with a new way of eating. I am now about a week into it, and according to the ketostix (which I know aren't always biochemically accurate) I'm in ketosis. I figure I should be in ketosis being that I've been very diligent but now that I am in ketosis I am FREEZING!!! Did any else have this issue or are you having this issue? I was reading that it's a side effect of the body being in ketosis but as per usual on the internet there is always conflicting information. Can anyone else please let me know your experiences being in ketosis? I had various stages of body temp, cold in the winter and hot flushes but, now after 2 or so years I am never cold, unless the temperature says I should be or hot unless the sun is shining too much, actually it's one of the plus points that I like a lot. I was talking to a friend today who is experiencing the menopause with a lot of difficulties and I advised her to try ketosis - so I await the outcome. YES, I tend to freeze when I fast. My hands and my feet. Wrap up. Least you know its working! , I'll keep at it. Going to go to a Bikram class, for a work out but mostly to warm up!!! If it has a minus in front of it you have exercised more than you ate. If not you ate more than you exercises. I appantly is not very accurate in how I enter exercise so I worry more about what the ... Save your money. Anytime you hear of some random trick, research it. You have the internet at your fingertips. I started this RXdiet prescribe bymy doctor, it works great I lost 20 lbs., now I'm on maintenance and keeping it, I survive the Holidays. I have been trying to lose some weight and generally just build healthy habits and keto has been the only thing that's worked for me. M Continue reading >>

Why Does A Low Carb Diet Make You Feel Shaky?

Why Does A Low Carb Diet Make You Feel Shaky?

Never miss a post. Ever. Get notified when a new post is up! Why Does a Low Carb Diet Make You Feel Shaky? [This post has been updated to include information on real hypoglycemia. You can find that newer post here. ] It is a myth that all overweight people have insulin resistance and/or metabolic syndrome. Only 1 in 3 overweight individuals do not respond to insulin correctly. It is also a myth that everyones insulin and blood glucose levels soar into the clouds when they eat carbohydrates. This type of reaction means something is metabolically wrong. If you have normal blood glucose control, your bodys sensitivity to insulin will quickly take care of the small rise in glucose you get after you eat. In fact, typical folks never see a rise in blood sugar levels much above 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) no matter how much starch and sugar they eat. The rise in both blood glucose and insulin is only problematic for those with an abnormal blood glucose or insulin response to the carbohydrates you eat. Reasons for these strange reactions will vary from individual to individual, but taking the necessary steps to correct the problem can often make you feel worse instead of better. The first two weeks of a low-carb diet can send the body into a tizzy. You are: restricting the bodys first-used fuel source coaxing the liver to break down stored body fat While these changes can seriously disrupt your electrolyte balance if you dont get enough sodium and potassium -- what the low-carb flu actually is -- you can also feel tired and crave your favorite foods as your blood begins to clean out the allergens. The labels the low-carb community has adopted for this situation are not accurate. You do not: You do experience body changes and cleansing that sometimes takes several weeks to adjust to Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be on a Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted or keto adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. It also improves cellular healing and mitochondrial biogenesis which supports stronger and healthier cells. All of this leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). Where Ketosis Can Be Extremely Beneficial There are certain cases, where I typically recommend a ketogenic diet as the research appears to support that ketosis significantly improves the functionality of these individuals. Overweight or Obese Neurodegenerative Conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Most Cancers but especially those of the brain, nervous system and blood (leukemia) Chronic Pain Seizure Disorders Non-Elite athletes or individuals looking for higher mental & physical performance The final one is the area that I and many others who have pursued a state of ketosis fall into. At this point in my life, I have no chronic diseases, I feel great 99% of the time, but I am always looking to improve my productivity and performance. I have found being in mild-ketosis to be one of the best ways to improve my energy, mental acuity, creativity, physical strength and overall life performance. There is no one diet that works perfectly for everyone. Ketosis has the potential to benefit everyone, but under unique circumstances it would not be warranted. Here are a list of special cases where long-term st Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

Have you just started a low-carb diet? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted and overcome by tiredness? Perhaps you are thinking that going low-carb wasn’t a good idea after all… You might already know that these symptoms are not uncommon, especially if you are doing low-carb for the first time. Also known as “low carb flu” or “Atkins flu”, this phase is completely normal – although by no means pleasant. This condition occurs when you cut your carb intake sharply, to about 20-30g a day, in order to induce ketosis. What is low-carb flu? Your body is used to running on carbs. It’s been operating this way for decades. Cutting carbs in favour of fat is a huge change for your metabolism. Your body needs some time to adjust to this change. This period of adjustment can sometimes cause flu-like symptoms. Fatigue is the most common one, but you could also get muscle cramps, headaches, dizziness and mental fog. Some of these symptoms are markers of sugar withdrawal. Sugar addiction is real and common, so trying to break away can be difficult. Low-carb flu is not actual flu Please note that “low carb flu” does not include fever or respiratory cold-like symptoms such as coughing or sneezing. If you are experiencing any of these, it means that you might have actually caught an infection! So it would be a good idea to postpone starting your diet until you are all clear. How can you fight tiredness and other symptoms of low-carb flu? First of all, remember that it won’t last forever. Low-carb flu usually lasts around 3-5 days (although could be 1-2 weeks for some unlucky people with high metabolic resistance). Here are some simple tips on making this transition easier. 1) Eat more fat Fat is the key to this whole issue. You must eat lots of it – a lot more th Continue reading >>

More in ketosis