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Really Cold In Ketosis

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet? | Psychology Of Eating

What Is A Ketogenic Diet? | Psychology Of Eating

Here at The Institute for the Psychology of Eating we do NOT endorse or promote any particular diet or nutritional lifestyle. We do highly encourage that each person openly explores the wide variety of nutritional approaches and dietary strategies that are available to them. We seenutrition as an ever-changing journey. We believe that a healthy relationship with food and a well functioning metabolism is possible when we can each be open to what works best for ourselves, and others. Webelieve theres a nugget ofwisdom to be found in just about any dietthats been designed with care in mind for people and planet. As the paleo lifestyle gains more backing and more mainstream acceptance, one of the myths that needs to be consistently dispelled is whether going paleo requires you to adhere to a low-carb/high-protein diet indefinitely. The short answer, of course, is no. There are many, many ways to enjoy a paleo approach without going low carb. Even still, there seems to be some overlap and a persistent misunderstanding that paleo equals low-carb (LC) or even very low carb (VLC) lifestyle only, and that theres some inherent requirement or increased benefit by engaging in whats known as a Ketogenic Diet. Do they share some overlap? Sure but that doesnt necessarily mean that one indicates the other. Ketogenic diets are popular in the fitness world, and as one interpretation of the paleo diet, because of their tendency to alter the metabolic state of the body, their impact on brain chemistry, and therefore, how they change the bodys method (and specifically the brain) of deriving its energy. Basic biology states that every cell in our body runs on glucose, including our brain cells. But when youre on a ketogenic diet, your body switches from glucose to fat as a chosen fuel sourc Continue reading >>

How To Identify Ketosis

How To Identify Ketosis

Expert Reviewed Ketosis is a normal metabolic process by which your body breaks down stored fat for energy, which can also result in a dangerous buildup of ketones in the body called ketoacidosis.[1] Ketosis is often the product of a low-carbohydrate diet that people use to lose weight and gain muscle or it can also be a product of malnutrition. Although the long-term risks of ketosis are not clear, there is some evidence that it can increase your risk of heart disease and certain cancers.[2] By recognizing the signs of ketosis, you can help minimize your risk for developing ketoacidosis.[3] Continue reading >>

Ketosis Experiment Update: I Yield

Ketosis Experiment Update: I Yield

As one commenter put it, I’ve cravenly gone “running back to my ‘safe starches'” after experimenting with nutritional ketosis (NK) for a paltry 6 days. After my update last Thursday, I made it one more day and then gave up. The meal pictured here was the safe starch bomb that rescued me from NK. It was a banana tapioca crepe topped with an entire 10-ounce bag of frozen blackberries cooked in a tablespoon of maple syrup. It was amazing. And it was my second helping, if you couldn’t tell by my soiled plate :) Here’s what happened. I felt like ass last week. I thought I’d felt fatigued before in my life, but I was wrong. For 6 days I felt the cold grips of death taking hold of my body. Plus, I’ve never felt so limited and trapped in a diet before in my life, and I’m pretty freaking good at being on restrictive diets. One commenter said she snacks on bacon grease and butter on this diet. Honestly, kudos to her, but if I did that I think I’d throw up, and either way I can’t do that because I don’t eat butter. So I was at my emotional limit of fat intake at 70+% of my diet. If I could eat cream, butter, or cheese, I may not have felt so limited and bored by my options. I don’t eat dairy, nuts, seeds, or olive oil (sensitive to all), so my fats were the following. Avocados Bacon grease Bacon Coconut oil Coconut milk Coconut manna Any other fat from meat I ate the following on one typical day. Breakfast 1 egg with veggies and salsa 3 pieces bacon 1 tablespoon bacon grease to cook it all in 1/2 avocado 2 tablespoons coconut manna Lunch 3 oz chicken 3/4 avocado with some salsa 1/2 carrot 1/2 celery stalk Dinner Very high fat pork chili with some veggies cooked in a tablespoon extra bacon grease Before bed because I was STARVING 3 tablespoons coconut mann Continue reading >>

Sick Day Management On A Ketogenic Diet

Sick Day Management On A Ketogenic Diet

School is out, flowers are blooming, fireworks are in the air and it couldn’t be a worse time to get sick. Let’s face it, we’ve all had those horrible summer sick days. Throw being on a ketogenic diet into the mix, and the result is far from a “summer break”. KetoVie’s ketogenic dietitian specialists, Rebecca Jennings and Mary Susan Spears, share their tips to help make your sick day more manageable. Rebecca and Mary Susan joined the KetoVie team in order to provide additional resources to our customers. Both are practiced ketogenic dietitians and are always happy to answer any questions you may have about the ketogenic diet! Their biographies and contact information can be found on our website here. While these tips are helpful, they do not replace the necessary communication needed with your keto team to ensure safety. Tip #1. Hydrate. Encourage fluids to avoid dehydration. Aim for at least 1 cup of fluids every hour, more if a fever is present. Use water or calorie free beverage choices. Diluted Powerade Zero can be used as an electrolyte replacement drink. Refer to the Charlie Foundation’s list of Low Carb and Carb-Free Products for more beverage options (Signs of dehydration include decreased urine output, dry eyes and dry lips. Tip #2. Maintain diet if possible. As long as the diet is tolerated, continue the diet as prescribed. If nausea, vomiting or diarrhea are a problem, you can try offering casseroles, soups or ketogenic formula such as KetoVie, so every bite and sip is in the prescribed ratio. You may need to temporarily offer reduced calorie or reduced ratio meals such as broth. Return to the prescribed meal plan as able. Contact your keto team if meals or fluids are not tolerated greater than 24 hours. Tip #3. You may see lower ketones during Continue reading >>

What Is Keto Flu ?

What Is Keto Flu ?

So What is Keto Flu Anyways!? I posted this What is Keto Flu article below back in the summer of 2013 when I had no idea what I was doing or what keto flu was. All I knew is that I was sick as a dog! I’ve learned so much since then and so many people manage to find this article, so I thought I should update it with the solutions that work! The Keto flu is also called Ketosis Flu, Ketogenic Flu, Induction Flu and Carb Flu depending on what groups you hang out in. It normally is what happens after your first couple of days without carbs. Not to every single person, but most people go through some sort of carb withdrawal and/or carb detox. What actually causes the Keto Flu Symptoms? Keto flu happens when our bodies shift from glucose or sugar burning mode to fat burning mode. It is basically an electrolyte imbalance. On a keto diet we need more magnesium, potassium and sodium. Luckily, this is a pretty easy problem to solve and I wish I had known about this 3 years ago! Can You Stop Keto Flu ? You know, for some of us, the keto flu is something we just have to go through for a few days. Think of it as a detox because bottom line, that is what is happening. You are detoxing from sugar, carbs, wheat, all those things that are holding you back from optimal health. But even though you likely can’t stop keto flu, you sure can minimize the symptoms! Drink lots of salty chicken broth. Use a magnesium supplement. You will be amazed at how helpful this will be! I recommend using Lo Salt or any similar blend that has potassium and sodium. My other go to remedy is a nightly drink of Calm. This is a magnesium drink that I swear by and I still use it almost every night. Not only does Calm prevent leg cramps but it also keeps me regular, which can be an issue for low carbers. It is Continue reading >>

Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling And Overtraining

Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling And Overtraining

“My training, racing, and health were all great… until I crashed.” For athletes, it’s not uncommon for the transition to a ketogenic diet from a standard high-carbohydrate diet to look something like this: Take all the carbs out of your diet, cold-turkey - feel awful… Build the metabolic machinery to burn fat more efficiently - feel great! Suddenly, out of nowhere - crash. Like a rollercoaster, you went from feeling terrible to feeling on top of the world, and then back to feeling terrible. The question is “why the crash??” You think: maybe I just need to do a few more fasted training sessions each week. Or, maybe I need to drop my carbs from 30 grams per day to 20 grams per day (broccoli just has too many carbs)... Nope. You might just need to train less and eat more. Still here? Good. This is part one of a series of articles examining potential reasons why a ketogenic diet may fail to produce the expected benefits. Regardless of whether things are just now starting to go downhill, or you never saw results in the first place, the most important step is recognizing that something isn’t right. Getting into nutritional ketosis is one thing, but just because you’re registering 2.0mmol/L on the blood ketone meter doesn’t mean the diet is working for you. Ultimately, performance and health are the goals, and they may or may not coincide with high blood ketones. There are many aspects of life as an endurance athlete that must be accounted for in the equation of optimal health and performance. The most important one that we regularly see is people struggling on a ketogenic diet because they’re underfueling and overtraining. So that’s where we’ll begin! Ultimately, performance and health are the goals, and they may or may not coincide with high blood k Continue reading >>

Vlcd And Ketosis Side Effects - Feeling The Cold - Smldiet Blog

Vlcd And Ketosis Side Effects - Feeling The Cold - Smldiet Blog

* Feeling colder than usual (cold hands, cold feet). Feeling colder is very common and this is because when we are in ketosis, the body naturally tries to preserve energy where it can and one thing it does is to slow certain processes down and that's why we usually feel colder with our extremities such as hands and feet really feeling it. What can I do about feeling the cold on a VLCD? Depending on the time of year, you may not notice the cold as much (slimmers in the summer sometimes welcome that cooler body temperature feeling) but if you are on a VLCD in Autumn or Winter, you may notice it more and here's what you can do to help yourself warm up. Ensure you drink plenty of hot drinks - teas, coffees, SMLDiet fat burner made up with hot water or SMLDiet hot chocolate drink can certainly help you warm up quickly. With our plans you are allowed a small amount of semi or skimmed milk so you can easily enjoy you tea or coffee with milk as usual. There are some AMAZING flavoured teas and coffees out there - Beanies is a range of coffees that VLCD slimmers love because it has a huge range of flavours and you can easily pick up a jar in your local supermarket. For teas, I personally love the Twinings range. They have brought out a range of flavours such as caramel green tea so I know I'm getting the good stuff whilst satisfying that sweet tooth itch. Boullion is a MUST - VLCD companies will HATE me for telling you about this product. The reason being is that VLCD companies sell a 'savoury broth' which is basically boullion re-packaged (but for alot more money than you would buy in your supermarket). Boullion is made by Marigold and is available from supermarkets (usually found in the gravy or broth aisle). It costs less than 2 a tub and is delicious. Do get the reduced salt Continue reading >>

The Ketosis Promise Land

The Ketosis Promise Land

(Week 7-11) How the search for additional marginal gains led me to the path of tenuous benefits and brought me (almost) nothing but misery. While studying various aspects of LC way of living, It wasn’t difficult to stumble upon the term “keto-adaptation” or ketosis, that seemed to pop up very frequently, especially with relation in endurance training. This keto adaptation approach entails severely limiting your carbohydrate intake, usually to less than 50g per day, in order to teach your body metabolism to burn and use exclusively fat for fuel, i.e. to use ketone bodies instead of glucose. The body’s reliance on fat as a primary fuel in endurance exercise is the “holy grail” in sports nutrition, as even the leanest of athletes have enough body fat stores for a couple or Ironman races. The theory behind this approach was obtained from excellent book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance from Phinney and Volek and various internet sources, most notably from Peter Attia’s eatingacademy.com. The theory behind keto-adaptation seemed plausible and very compelling, therefore decision was unambiguous: bring on even more fat! I got myself a blood ketone body measuring device (Precision Xtra NFR Blood Glucose Monitoring System ), and after some additional tinkering with my nutrition, I managed to get myself into “keto-adapted” state. For me to achieve this, I needed to cut my carbs to less than 50g per day and limiting protein intake to fewer than 140 g (less than 2g per kg of body weight). Time wise it took me 7 weeks from starting LC to get to keto-adapted state. The results were most dramatically seen in my body composition. I leaned out even more reaching a body weight of 67 kg, lowest in 5 years. But most striking difference from a couple of w Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 3—being Sick On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 3—being Sick On A Ketogenic Diet

The good, the bad, and the confusing…I am fascinated by this experience and I love this diet, but it continues to leave me with more questions than answers. This week, my biggest challenge was being sick on a ketogenic diet and the associated struggles with maintaining ketosis and energy. Note: this post was originally published on Aug 1, 2013. It was edited to streamline content and improve graphics, then re-posted in June 2016, therefore some older comments may pertain to content that was removed during revision. This post is part of a series describing my attempt to follow Dr. Seyfried’s dietary recommendations for cancer. To start at the beginning, please go to the first post: Seyfried’s Ketogenic Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-Start to Ketosis. Notes: Sleep was terrible—slept for 3 hours then wide awake from 1:30 am to 5:00 am, then back to sleep, slept through the alarm. Woke up with mild headache and dry eyes, and felt slightly bloated. Mild cough and sore throat. Not hungry at all in the morning. Day 16 (2/15/13) Notes: Mild headache and dry eyes in the morning. Slightly bloated. Cold symptoms continue. Appetite was nice and low and I was able to work a very full and busy day without any problems other than feeling a little irritable. Sleep horrendous again. Day 17 (2/16/13) Notes: A bit hungry in the morning (stomach growly, slightly lightheaded). Cold symptoms worsening. No dry eyes (no olives yesterday). One hour after eating leg of duck I felt sleepy and achey. I wonder if the meat wasn’t fresh enough (it was one of those vacuum-packed meats with a longer shelf life) or if the protein grams were too many too eat all at once? I checked my blood sugar out of curiosity and it was 84. I napped for 90 minutes. I avoided olives, vinaigrette, bacon, and avo Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Part Two: Troubleshooting

The Ketogenic Diet Part Two: Troubleshooting

Since writing about the ketogenic diet, I received a slew of inquiries on the “how-to’s,” and the process of keto-adaptation. I have also received emails from some who are having a hard time breaking into ketosis. There are numerous factors involved in the adaptation process and properly following the diet for success; however, I believe more research is needed to learn why some people become efficient fat burning machines and others struggle to keto-adapt and lose fat. I have learned a lot working with so many weight loss resistant individuals, and will attempt to bring more clarity to some of these difficult questions. Since each of our bodies is different, the diet needs to be fine-tuned to gain the greatest benefits, but there are conditions like perimenopause, hypothyroidism, and neurotoxicity that I have found will keep someone from adapting to an efficient fat burner. The complex topic remains an ongoing subject of interest for me and many of my clients, and following are some common questions I’ve been asked, as well as strategies I developed to help those who struggle to break through into fat burning machines. Some people confuse being in nutritional ketosis (NK) with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which is very different. DKA is a serious condition affecting people with diabetes (mostly type 1), and occurs due to a massive shortage of insulin in the body that forces the body to burn fatty acids for energy and gives off a massive amount of the byproduct from the fat burning (ketones > than 10). The lack of insulin also leads to an increased release of glucose by the liver and dangerously high blood sugar levels, and can result in death. Conversely, NK is safe, produces normal levels of blood ketones from fat burning (.5 to 5), and can provide outstanding Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Are In Ketosis

7 Signs You Are In Ketosis

The Ketogenic Diet (also known as “keto”) has been all over social media. You’ve probably seen ripped fitness models claiming that Keto gave them their physique, and the even more inspiration stories of normal people like you and me, who lost weight and reclaimed their lives through this diet called Keto. If you’re not sure what the Ketogenic Diet is, head on over to What is a Keto Diet? (Ketogenic Diet 101). Over there I’ve detailed what exactly Keto is and isn’t, given you meal plans, snacks, and answered all of your questions about the diet. But let’s say you’ve jumped into Keto with both feet, and now you want to know “Is this working?” I don’t blame you. It can be hard to tell what’s going on inside your body. Are you in Ketosis? Are you eating few enough carbs? Are you shedding fat? Well, there are 7 obvious ways to tell if you’re in ketosis, without testing your blood or urine. Here are the signs you’re in Ketosis: 1. Weight Loss Weight loss is the first and most obvious sign that you’re in ketosis. The weight loss happens for a variety of reasons, but it’s important to note that it’s very fast in the beginning. This is because when you switch to a low-carb diet, your muscles start losing water. Carbohydrates are what bind water to your muscles, so when you’re not eating carbohydrates, your muscles start dumping them, and the attached water. That’s one of the things that causes Keto Flu (which you can read about in Keto 101), but drinking plenty of water and keeping your salt intake up will keep you hydrated and feeling healthy. After the initial water leaving your body, then you’ll start to see steady fat loss. Related Reading: My 60 Day Keto Challenge Results (I lost 23 pounds!) 2. Little or No Appetite When you stop eati Continue reading >>

Keto Induction Vs Hypoglycemia

Keto Induction Vs Hypoglycemia

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member I had what must have been false hypos when I switched to low carb, which I treated with a few grapes, then a sit down for a few minutes until the feeling passed. I think that if I had allowed myself to become anxious and consumed a lot of carbs I'd have been bouncing around like a ping pong ball. The relief did not last all that long, but I was at home so it was not all that dangerous - though I did get lost on my way to bed - I turn out all the lights and walk from the landing to bed in almost total darkness, but we have lived here for decades so it was quite a strange feeling to become disoriented. After a day or so the feeling passed and I went into ketosis, but I did have to persist. I could have dropped the carb count more slowly to allow time for my body to adapt - but I have never been afraid of low carb, and still aren't despite the hypo feeling. The article you have just posted is written by people who haven't got a clue about the symptoms and how RH happens, it is a supposition that everyone has reactive hypoglycaemic and it is normal for those who have episodes of RH is normal. The condition they are describing is post prandial symptoms that are not hypos, there is a condition that is not RH but has the exact symptoms but don't hypo. My condition is real, my symptoms are real, I have a high intolerance to carbs and sugars. I have been in ketosis for well over two years, it is symptom free and since going into ketosis I have not had an episode of Hypoglycaemia. I know I still have the condition because of my last eOGTT (extended or prolonged oral glucose test) and I still went into hypo. Don' Continue reading >>

Drink Cold Water For Fast Fat Loss

Drink Cold Water For Fast Fat Loss

What if we said that ice can rev up metabolism and increase weight loss? (And no, were not talking about Nattie Ice .) When the body is exposed to cold temperatures like ingesting a glass of icy water it burns extra calories to keep itself warm, increasing metabolism by up to 50% in the process. Looks like Mr. Freeze had the right idea! The human body is constantly trying to maintain a static temperature of 98.6 degrees . The colder the surrounding or internal conditions, the more calories the body burns to keep warm Fat metabolism, exercise, and the cold. . Shephard, RJ. School of Physical & Health Education, University of Toronto, Ontario. Canadian Journal of Sport Sciences. 1992 Jun; 17(2):83-90. . Metabolism acts like a furnace that must burn fuel to keep the body nice and toasty. Luckily, the bodys fuel of choice for keeping warm is brown fat, more commonly known as the stuff comprising muffin tops (and not the tasty kind). Drinking iced water is one of several ways to harness this mechanism for weight loss, since the body must compensate for the sudden temperature drop. One 16 ounce glass of cold water can burn up to 17.5 calories, no treadmill required. Cold showers, a lowered thermostat, and vigorous swims in pools full of orange juice concentrate all utilize this same mechanism. But dont run off with the penguins just yet: exposure to extreme cold might do a lot more harm than good and can cause severe complications in people with cardiovascular conditions. Plus, fewer than 20 calories per glass will hardly transform modern-day Val Kilmer back into Iceman . Still looking to melt off extra pounds (or at least ounces)? For that thermodynamic edge, throw some ice in a drink and get ready to harness that inner, slimmer cool cat . Drink ice water to speed metabolis Continue reading >>

How To Get Into Ketosis For Optimal Cognitive Performance

How To Get Into Ketosis For Optimal Cognitive Performance

How To Get Into Ketosis For Optimal Cognitive Performance SelfHacked has the strictest sourcing guidelines in the health industry and we almost exclusively link to medically peer-reviewed studies, usually on PubMed. We believe that the most accurate information is found directly in the scientific source. We are dedicated to providing the most scientifically valid, unbiased, and comprehensive information on any given topic. Our team comprises of trained MDs, PhDs, pharmacists, qualified scientists, and certified health and wellness specialists. All of our content is written by scientists and people with a strong science background. Our science team is put through the strictest vetting process in the health industry and we often reject applicants who have written articles for many of the largest health websites that are deemed trustworthy. Our science team must pass long technical science tests, difficult logical reasoning and reading comprehension tests. They are continually monitored by our internal peer-review process and if we see anyone making material science errors, we don't let them write for us again. Our goal is to not have a single piece of inaccurate information on this website. If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please leave a comment or contact us at [email protected] Note that each number in parentheses [1, 2, 3, etc.] is a clickable link to peer-reviewed scientific studies. A plus sign next to the number [1+, 2+, etc...] means that the information is found within the full scientific study rather than the abstract. Heres a sample protocol. Ive given more options below for you to tinker with, but if you just want clear and simple instructions, here you go. I think this is simple enough and doable Continue reading >>

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