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Rapidly Reverse Ketosis

Nutrition Test 3

Nutrition Test 3

Home > Preview The flashcards below were created by user jgething on FreezingBlue Flashcards. Your roommate Demetrius is participating in a weightlifting course and complains of a burning pain during workouts. You explain to Demetrius that the rapid breakdown of glucose in his muscles produces large amounts of pyruvate, which leads to a fall in pH within the muscle and that the muscle responds by converting excess pyruvate to what? Author: jgething ID: 267656 Filename: Nutrition Test 3 Updated: March 3, 5877521 Tags: Jack Folders: Description: Jack Show Answers: Home > Flashcards > Print Preview Continue reading >>

Nutrition & Meal Replacement Programs

Nutrition & Meal Replacement Programs

The nutrition and meal replacement programs at NYU Langone’s Weight Management Program are designed for you to lose weight safely, conveniently, rapidly, and comfortably, without hunger, pills, or shots and while under clinical supervision. We offer two options for nutrition-focused weight loss. The New You program, created by Dr. Holly Lofton, offers doctor-supervised meal replacement as well as a healthy meal of your choice each day. The Dietitian Led Weight Loss Program is supervised by a registered dietitian, and combines meal replacement items with a diet focused on well-balanced meals. About the New You Program New You is a medically supervised weight management program. Depending on the plan you choose, it includes three to five meal replacements per day, along with one meal consisting of lean protein and flavorful, filling vegetables. This daily meal is made up of 300 to 600 calories, depending on your gender and weight. Each meal replacement is comprised of 27 grams of whey protein and 10 grams of carbohydrates. The essence of the program is to learn how to keep hunger at bay by using behavioral tools and low-glycemic, high-protein foods at every meal. Dr. Lofton's goal is to help each patient to develop his or her unique eating lifestyle, which promotes sound cardiovascular, behavioral, and nutritional health. As part of the program, you are required to meet biweekly with a member of our medical team, which includes Dr. Lofton, a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or registered dietitian. We also provide you with nutritional and behavioral support. Support groups designed to maximize your weight loss potential, help you make lifestyle changes, and reinforce the nutritional aspects of weight loss are also available to all New You™ members. New You is Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet (or keto diet) has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvement. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) for energy to dietary fat and, critically, your own body fat after the stage of “ketosis” is reached. Meanwhile, beyond its outstanding potential to help people lose weight and burn off fat stores, research shows that the ketogenic diet helps to fight serious diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer’s. Table of Contents 1. What Is the Keto Diet? What Is Ketosis? How to Get Into Ketosis What Are the Stages of Ketosis? Does the Keto Diet Work for Women? 2. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet 3. What Is the Ketogenic Diet Plan? 5. Keto Side Effects and the Keto Flu What Is the Keto Diet? The ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet plan that was originally designed in the 1920s for patients with epilepsy by researchers working at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. (1) Researchers found that fasting — avoiding consumption of all foods for a brief period of time, including those that provide carbohydrates — helped reduce the amount of seizures patients suffered, in addition to having other positive effects on body fat, blood sugar, cholesterol and hunger levels. (4) Unfortunately, long-term fasting is not a feasible op Continue reading >>

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A keto or ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many proven benefits for weight loss, health and performance, as millions of people have experienced already. 1 Here you’ll learn how to eat a keto diet based on real foods. You’ll find visual guides, recipes, meal plans and a simple 2-week get started program, all you need to succeed on keto. Get even more, custom meal plans, ask the experts and low-carb TV, with a free trial. 1. Introduction: What is ketosis? The “keto” in a ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”. 2 This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then used as fuel throughout the body, including the brain. The brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day, 3 and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose… or ketones. On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low, and fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is obviously great if you’re trying to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, such as less hunger and a steady supply of energy. When the body produces ketones, it’s said to be in ketosis. The fastest way to get there is by fasting – not eating anything – but nobody can fast forever. A keto diet, on the other hand, can be eaten indefinite Continue reading >>

Dr. David Ludwig Clears Up Carbohydrate Confusion

Dr. David Ludwig Clears Up Carbohydrate Confusion

When our country embraced low-fat diets, we also unwittingly committed ourselves to carbohydrates. As nutrition research has advanced, however, we’ve learned that healthy fats are an important part of a well-balanced diet, and that carbohydrate quality is crucial to health. Dr. David Ludwig, MD, PhD, a professor in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, is one of the foremost experts when it comes to carbohydrates. His research focuses on the effects of diet on hormones, metabolism and body weight, and he developed a “low glycemic load” diet – one that decreases the surge in blood sugar after meals – for the treatment of obesity-related diseases. In a 2013 editorial (1), he and Dr. Walter Willett explain that “Many starchy foods, particularly highly processed grains and potato products, have a high glycemic index, raising blood glucose and insulin more rapidly than an equivalent amount of sucrose” – going on to explain that refined grain and potato products have metabolic effects comparable to those of sugar. In a JAMA viewpoint article (2), Dr. Ludwig examined the health effects of fructose, explaining that “Excessive intake of refined sugar plays a significant role in the epidemics of obesity and related diseases.” He also noted that rapidly absorbed forms of glucose—present in both sugar and high glycemic index starch—also contribute to these diseases. Here, we ask Dr. Ludwig to help clear up the carbohydrate confusion. Sugar has been singled out as one of the worst dietary offenders. However, you make the case that highly processed carbohydrates and potato products are just as bad. Should there be more publi Continue reading >>

The Nervous System And Metabolic Dysregulation: Emerging Evidence Converges On Ketogenic Diet Therapy

The Nervous System And Metabolic Dysregulation: Emerging Evidence Converges On Ketogenic Diet Therapy

Go to: A link between metabolism and brain function is clear. Since ancient times, epileptic seizures were noted as treatable with fasting, and historical observations of the therapeutic benefits of fasting on epilepsy were confirmed nearly 100 years ago. Shortly thereafter a high fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) debuted as a therapy to reduce seizures. This strict regimen could mimic the metabolic effects of fasting while allowing adequate caloric intake for ongoing energy demands. Today, KD therapy, which forces predominantly ketone-based rather than glucose-based metabolism, is now well-established as highly successful in reducing seizures. Cellular metabolic dysfunction in the nervous system has been recognized as existing side-by-side with nervous system disorders – although often with much less obvious cause-and-effect as the relationship between fasting and seizures. Rekindled interest in metabolic and dietary therapies for brain disorders complements new insight into their mechanisms and broader implications. Here we describe the emerging relationship between a KD and adenosine as a way to reset brain metabolism and neuronal activity and disrupt a cycle of dysfunction. We also provide an overview of the effects of a KD on cognition and recent data on the effects of a KD on pain, and explore the relative time course quantified among hallmark metabolic changes, altered neuron function and altered animal behavior assessed after diet administration. We predict continued applications of metabolic therapies in treating dysfunction including and beyond the nervous system. Keywords: adenosine, epilepsy, glucose, inflammation, long-term potentiation, metabolism, pain, seizure Go to: The Ketogenic Diet and Ketone-Based Metabolism Metabolism influences brain act Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To A Ketogenic Diet

The Ultimate Guide To A Ketogenic Diet

Time to talk Keto. A Ketogenic Diet is a diet with very low or no carbohydrates. Any guide we make will cover everything we can think of to make this the single best resource around, and due to that, you may want to skip some sections. Like always, we will start with the history of this famous diet, get into some science, and blow you away with all the practical advice you will ever need. For those who want to skip ahead, we included a quick table of contents for this very long (6,000 words or so) article. The Legendary Beginning of the Atkins Diet I very well could have made several articles on the Atkins Diet alone. Yes, this is a fad diet. Unlike most fad diets (Cabbage soup, I am looking at you), the ketogenic diet is based on science. Albeit, the sciece of just one study. The story goes like his, the future Dr. Atkins stumbled upon a study in the Jama network, a leading scientific research collective. After reading the study, which was designed to test fat loss on a medical diet, Dr. Atkins invented the Atkins Diet around 1958. My beef with Atkins is the connection of Atkins to real ketogenic science. The connection is a well-known study by Dr. Wishnofsky. The study proved a diet high in fat, and with moderate protein will cause weight loss. The Atkins Diet claim was that this study demonstrated that you could lose weight without a caloric deficit if you eat the right magic meats and fats. Wait, Lose Weight Without a Caloric Deficit? Atkins claimed that the study proved you could lose weight without a caloric deficit. Is it true? Partly. Including water weight you drop from ketosis, you can lose weight without a caloric deficit. My problem with this is Dr. Wishnofsky never said this. The study was not about some magic weight loss combination. (Yes, I link to the st Continue reading >>

Reversal Of Diabetic Nephropathy By A Ketogenic Diet

Reversal Of Diabetic Nephropathy By A Ketogenic Diet

Go to: Introduction While intensive insulin therapy and other interventions slow the development of diabetic complications [1], there is far less evidence that these interventions reverse diabetic complications. For example, tight glucose control prevented the development of nephropathy (as indicated by proteinuria) in a rat model of Type 1 diabetes, but did not reverse nephropathy once proteinuria had developed [2]. Thus there is a general consensus that diabetes is associated with progressive and cumulative processes that are much more amenable to retardation than to reversal. Nevertheless, from a clinical perspective, reversing pathologies associated with diabetes would be far more valuable than simply delaying their onset. We have proposed that both diabetic complications and age-related pathologies develop due to a progressive and cumulative effect of glucose metabolism that produces a bistable hysteretic effect on gene expression [3]. In addition to glycolytic enzymes that would be expected to produce oxidative stress [3], glucose metabolism also induces a variety of molecular responses such as thioredoxin-interaction protein [4] and p65 [5] that could plausibly contribute to nephropathy. Indeed, the latter induction is persistent, even after normalization of glucose, thus exemplifying glucose-induced hysteresis and its clinical correlate, metabolic memory, including in nephropathy [6]. Furthermore, based particularly on detailed analysis of the hysteretic behavior of the lac operon [7], [8], we have hypothesized that sufficiently prolonged and robust reduction in glucose metabolism or molecular responses to glucose metabolism may reverse this bistable molecular state, leading to reversal of pathology [3]. While examining basic mechanisms mediating molecular respo Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis is an energy state that your body uses to provide an alternative fuel when glucose availability is low. It happens to all humans when fasting or when carbohydrate intake is lowered. The process of creating ketones is a normal metabolic alternative designed to keep us alive if we go without food for long periods of time. Eating a diet low in carb and higher in fat enhances this process without the gnawing hunger of fasting. Let’s talk about why ketones are better than glucose for most cellular fuel needs. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Body Fuel Basics Normal body cells metabolize food nutrients and oxygen during cellular “respiration”, a set of metabolic pathways in which ATP (adenosine triphosphate), our main cellular energy source is created. Most of this energy production happens in the mitochondria, tiny cell parts which act as powerhouses or fueling stations. There are two primary types of food-based fuel that our cells can use to produce energy: The first cellular fuel is glucose, which is commonly known as blood sugar. Glucose is a product of the starches and sugars (carbohydrates) and protein in our diet. This fuel system is necessary, but it has a limitation. The human body can only store about 1000-1600 calories of glucose in the form of glycogen in our muscles and liver. The amounts stored depend on how much muscle mass is available. Men will be able to store more because they have a greater muscle mass. Since most people use up about 2000 calories a day just being and doing normal stuff, you can see that if the human body depended on only sugar to fuel itself, and food weren’t available for more than a day, the body would run Continue reading >>

How To Make A Fat Cell Less Not Thin: The Lessons Of Fat Flux

How To Make A Fat Cell Less Not Thin: The Lessons Of Fat Flux

I do still plan to finish the third, and perhaps a fourth, part on the “Ketosis – advantaged or misunderstood state?” mini-series. However, a question I get often makes me realize a tiny bit of housekeeping is in order before we go there. The question is basically a variation on this theme: Does being in ketosis automatically translate to fat loss? For those too busy to read ahead, let me give you the punch line: No. For those who want to understand why, keep reading (hopefully this is still everyone). This topic is — surprise, surprise — very nuanced, and almost always bastardized when oversimplified, which I’m about to do, though hopefully less than most. Without oversimplifying, though, this will turn into a textbook of 1,000 pages. From the ketosis series, or at least the first and second part, along with the video in this previous post, you should have taken away that ketosis is not some ‘magical state of mystery.’ It’s simply a state of physiology where our liver turns fatty acid (both ingested and stored) into ketones. In part III (and possibly a part IV) of that series, I’ll go more into the actions of ketones and why you may or may not want to consider putting yourself into a state where your liver makes them. There seems to be great confusion around ‘nutritional’ ketosis (a term we use to distinguish ‘dietary-induced’ ketosis from the other 2 forms of ketosis: starvation ketosis and ketoacidosis, the latter a serious complication of type I diabetes). But, before I try to dispel any of the confusion, we need to go through a little primer on what I like to call “fat flux.” One point before diving in, please do not assume because I’m writing this post that I think adiposity (the technical term for relative amount of fat in the bo Continue reading >>

The Many Benefits Of Ketosis

The Many Benefits Of Ketosis

Along with living an alkaline lifestyle, one of the key principles of my Magic Menopause hormone reset program is eating a ketogenic-friendly diet. This diet puts your body in a fat-burning state called ketosis. My program’s Keto-Alkaline™ Diet includes ketogenic methodologies. It also incorporates the “reality of everyday life” into one’s diet. I’ll explain what I mean about this in just a moment. First, for those of you who aren’t familiar with ketosis, let me give you a short overview. A ketogenic diet is a diet which is low in (unhealthy) carbs and high in (healthy) fats and (healthy) protein. So how does a ketogenic diet work so well at supporting fat loss and other health benefits? It’s really a simple concept at the surface, a bit more complex when you look at the actual physiology. Ketosis is all about what your body uses as fuel. Eating high carbs = high blood glucose (sugar), high insulin, stored fat… and low fat burning, low metabolism and belly fat. Your body’s fuel source is glucose, not fat. Let me explain. When you eat carbs your body’s blood glucose increases and spikes your blood sugar. Your body releases more insulin as a reaction to elevated blood glucose levels. Insulin is produced to get the glucose from your body and into the cells. There it gets converted to energy. Your body burns the glucose to make its energy and then insulin tells the cells to store their energy as carbs or fat (the unhealthy and dreaded belly fat). When you eat a lot of carbs on an ongoing basis (like many Americans do, eating a lot of processed foods, sugar, alcohol, soda and such!) insulin is continually stimulated. This can lead to a health condition called insulin resistance, where the cells start to resist the insulin. When this happens, your blood Continue reading >>

What Is Gluconeogenesis?

What Is Gluconeogenesis?

Eat fat burn fat. Eat carbs burn carbs. It’s that simple, right? Yes and no. There’s more to it. Your body has many different metabolic pathways that it uses to provide energy for your cells. Glycolysis (using sugar for fuel) and lipolysis (using fat for fuel through beta-oxidation) are the most well-known metabolic pathways, but there are many more. One pathway, in particular, can turn the amino acids from protein into fuel. Why does it matter? Because this may be the one thing that is holding you back from getting into ketosis and losing fat while you are on a ketogenic diet. Gluconeogenesis — Your Liver’s “Magic Trick” If you are under some form stress or consume excess protein, your liver will perform a magic trick called gluconeogenesis. This literally translates to “the making of (genesis) new (neo) sugar (gluco)”. During gluconeogenesis, the liver (and occasionally the kidneys) turns non-sugar compounds like amino acids (the building blocks of protein), lactate, and glycerol into sugar that the body uses a fuel. When glycogen (your body’s sugar storage) is low, protein intake is high, or the body is under stress, amino acids from your meals and your muscle become one of your main energy sources. If your body continues to convert amino acids into fuel, it can keep you from getting into ketosis. This is why some ketogenic dieters may experience an increase in body fat percentage and a decrease in muscle mass during their first couple weeks on the ketogenic diet. But there is no need to worry. The ketogenic diet will still help reverse common health issues like diabetes and obesity and improve health in many ways. When you start the diet, however, gluconeogenesis will get in the way. One of the Problems With Going Ketogenic During the first three d Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference paper. Here's a table of the actual numbers to show the differences in magnitude: Body Condition Quantity of Ketones Being Produced After a meal: 0.1 mmol/L Overnight Fast: 0.3 mmol/L Ketogenic Diet (Nutritional ketosis): 1-8 mmol/L >20 Days Fasting: 10 mmol/L Uncontrolled Diabetes (Ketoacidosis): >20 mmol/L Here's a more detailed explanation: Fact 1: Every human body maintains the blood and cellular fluids within a very narrow range between being too acidic (low pH) and too basic (high pH). If the blood pH gets out of the normal range, either too low or too high, big problems happen. Fact 2: The Continue reading >>

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

One of the most effective ways to tackle type 2 diabetes is to lose weight, and it seems that dramatic weight loss may be particularly beneficial for blood-sugar levels. This surprising effect was first seen in patients who had undergone weight-loss (bariatric) surgery. As well as losing weight, many also reversed their diabetes. We will look at surgery on the next page, but there may be ways to replicate these benefits without major surgery — the answer may be as simple as a drastic, short-term diet. This is very much cutting-edge thinking and is the brainchild of Professor Roy Taylor, director of Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre at Newcastle University. Inspired by the diabetes-reversing effects of bariatric surgery, he decided to investigate the impact of a short-term, low-calorie diet on type 2 diabetes, using regular MRI scans to record exactly what was going on in the body. What he found could help to transform the health of many people with type 2 diabetes, even those who have had it for years. In a study published in 2011, he took 11 people with newly diagnosed type 2 (defined as being diagnosed in the previous four years) and gave them liquid diet formula. This provided 600 calories and was formulated so they received the right amount of nutrients. They also had around 200 calories of non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli and spinach — these provided fibre usually obtained from carbs, which were excluded from the diet. After a week, MRI scans showed the fat around their livers had dropped by 30 per cent; furthermore, their blood-sugar levels were normal. At the end of the eight-week trial, fat levels in the pancreas had also plummeted and they were producing insulin again. Participants also lost an average of 2st 5lb (15kg). At a follow-up scan three m Continue reading >>

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