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Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy With Macular Edema Icd 10

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Icd-10, Part 4: How To Code For Diabetic Retinopathy

Written By: Elizabeth Cottle, CPC, OCS, Rajiv R. Rathod, MD, MBA, Sue Vicchrilli, COT, OCS, and E. Joy Woodke, COE, OCS Finding the ICD-10 codes for diabetic retinopathy can be tricky. They are not listed in Chapter 7, Diseases of the Eye and Adnexa (H00-H59), but are in the diabetes section (E08-E13) of Chapter 4, Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases. Retinal complications. To further confuse matters, the most common retinal complications are in Chapter 7, not Chapter 4. Examples include vitreous hemorrhage (H43.1-), traction detachment of retina (H33.4-), and rubeosis iridis (H21.1-). New options. ICD-10 features codes for diagnoses that don’t currently have codes. These include drug- or chemical-induced diabetes mellitus (E09.-); gestational diabetes (Q24.4-); neonatal diabetes mellitus (P70.2); and postpancreatectomy, postprocedural, or secondary diabetes mellitus (E13.-). Changes in Documentation Some terms that you’re using in charts—such as “NIDDM,” “controlled,” and “uncontrolled”—will be obsolete when ICD-10 starts on Oct. 1, 2015. Instead, diabetes documentation should address the following questions: Is it type 1 or type 2? Is there diabetic Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

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Eyes with macular edema caused by retinal branch vein occlusion underwent masked evaluation of fluorescein angiography to determine complete macular perfusion vs incomplete macular perfusion (capillary dropout, ischemia). Cases evaluated as incomplete macular perfusion showed a greater frequency of improvement (91%) in visual acuity than did perfused cases (29%) (P = .003) after a mean follow-up of 39 months. Ischemic edema is often transient, and is associated with a good outcome in visual acuity (median final visual acuity was 20/30). Perfused macular edema has a poorer prognosis for visual acuity (median final visual acuity was 20/80). Macular ischemia is usually associated with a broken foveal capillary ring. Previous animal research on ischemic brain edema has shown that following brain ischemia, an intracellular and an extracellular hypertonic environment lead to intracellular and extracellular edema (cytotoxic edema), which is often followed by vascular protein leakage (vasogenic edema). A similar occurrence in ischemic retina could explain the transient edema reported herein, with good outcome in visual acuity following the spontaneous resolution of edema.

E11.321-351 Diabetic Macular Edema

E11.321Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema E11.331Moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema E11.341Severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema E11.351Proliferative diabetic retinopathy,with macular edema A complication of diabetes that occurs when microaneurysms or dilated retinal capillaries leak fluid into the retina. Diabetes mellitus is a complex, multifactorial and heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by endogenous insulin deficiency and/or insulin resistance. The diseasemanifests itself as a state of chronic hyperglycemia with attendant microvascular and macrovascular complications. Macular edema may be present in any stage of diabetic retinopathy and is defined as any one of the following: Retinal thickening within 500 microns of the foveal center Hard exudates within 500 microns of the foveal center, if associated with the thickening of the adjacent retina Retinal thickening greater than one disc area in size, part of which is within one discdiameterof the center of the macul Walls of the blood vessels in the retina become fragile and weakened Weakened blood vessels have an increase in vascular Continue reading >>

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  1. the_gould

    > Does anyone test for Ketosis? what level do you get?

    Hi there
    I am not 100% interested in Ketosis but you hear everyone talking about it.
    So i thought i would go out and buy a kit and see if i was in ketosis. and i was.
    Anyone else test for ketosis?
    What level do you have?
    When do you test?
    What is your opinion on Ketosis?
    Thanks guys looking forward to hearing from you about this

  2. Kay_Bee

    I test every once in a while. Doing Atkins before I always got "trace", but since upping my fats to 80% of my daily calories, I get the highest levels.

  3. the_gould

    I test every once in a while. Doing Atkins before I always got "trace", but since upping my fats to 80% of my daily calories, I get the highest levels.
    I found that too- once i upped my fats i was at 40 mg/dl ++ ketone levels yesterday morning

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Here's a quick video tutorial on how to translate ICD-9 codes into ICD-10.

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 362.02 : Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

Short description: Prolif diab retinopathy. ICD-9-CM 362.02 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis on a reimbursement claim, however, 362.02 should only be used for claims with a date of service on or before September 30, 2015. For claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, use an equivalent ICD-10-CM code (or codes). You are viewing the 2012 version of ICD-9-CM 362.02. Convert to ICD-10-CM : 362.02 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E11.359 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with proliferative diabetic retinopathy without macular edema Diabetes 2 with retinopathy and retinal edema DM 1 w proliferative diabetic retinopathy DM 1 w proliferative diabetic retinopathy w macular edema DM 2 W diabetic proliferative retinopathy DM 2 w proliferative diabetic retinopathy DM 2 w proliferative diabetic retinopathy w macular edema Drug induced diabetes with proliferative retinopathy Drug induced DM w proliferative diabetic retinopathy Drug induced DM w proliferative diabetic retinopathy w macular edema Postoperative proliferative diabetic retinopathy Proliferative diabetic retinopathy associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus Proliferative diabetic Continue reading >>

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  1. WhoAteMyPsyche

    I've been trying to find the science between how the body reacts in ketosis vs someone who just tries to keep their carbs low. I know some people can be in ketosis with 50 carbs or less, but I do not think that is the case for most people.
    When I first started losing weight I was keeping my carbs between 40-50, and lost between 80-90 lbs. doing that. I then started doing more research (I stalled for a long time) and switched to keto and keep my carbs below 20. However, I'm working on a blog post trying to explain keto and would like to be able to explain, intelligently, the difference in ketosis vs "lowish" carbs.

    Can anyone point me to good research on this? Thank you!

  2. Fiorella

    Honestly, I think the best data or research is testing your own body, as in n=1. Starting at 20 g carbs is a starter's template. From there, you may need to go lower, or get away with pushing it higher. Let's say someone comes up with a bell curve showing where people have there carbs set at. It will still be a snapshot in time, possibly skewed to men/women only, age groups, metabolic diseases, athletic/sedentary, etc. Also, some people noticed that with time, the carb level requirement changed as their bodies health modified, too.

  3. WhoAteMyPsyche

    I completely agree that everyone is different and that the carb levels can change over time. I know, at least in my experience, just because someone knows about low carb doesn't mean they know what ketosis is. When I first started I was going off a plan I had followed in the 90s (Protein Power Plan) and knew nothing about ketosis. I had heard the term "keto" thrown around by a few people but just thought it was a different way of saying the same thing - Protein Power, Atkins, etc. So I guess the key is telling people WHAT keto is and why lowering your carbs works. They can then take that info and learn for themselves what works for them.

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