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Precision Xtra Ketone Meter South Africa

Which New Blood Glucose Meter Should You Buy In 2015?

Which New Blood Glucose Meter Should You Buy In 2015?

The number of blood glucose meters on the market today is staggering, and one of the most frequently asked questions in diabetes forums is “What meter do you use?” So, how do you choose? Do you need a meter that offers more help understanding the values and applying them to your life? Do you need something discreet? Do you want to share your data with a family member or health care provider? Do you care about the software it uses to connect to your computer? Since the development of SMBG (self monitoring of blood glucose) devices in the 1980s, meters have gotten smaller, faster, and sleeker. My first blood glucose meter in 1990 took time and effort to read a sample. It required an enormous sample from my tiny ten year old fingers, the blood had to sit on the pad of the strip for one minute, then I wiped the blood away with a cotton ball, then waited another minute or more to get the sample from the meter – a machine bigger than today’s largest smartphones. The array of meters available in 2015, however, offers options for the patient consumer looking for a meter that fits their lifestyle and even type of diabetes. In an age where we speak of precision medicine catering to the needs of the individual, we have individualized options at our…fingertips. I will unabashedly admit to loving the One Touch Verio IQ blood glucose monitoring system. It is slim enough to pocket, with bright readable data, and – my favorite feature – a port light that spans the top of the device that is substantial enough to check my blood glucose in the dark of night or in a movie theater without being offensive to those around me. The Verio IQ, much like its smartphone-connected sister the Verio IQ Sync, is a rechargeable meter. These two meters are marketed to tech-savvy type 1s or Continue reading >>

Precision Xtra Vs. Novamax Plus: Ketone Meter Evaluation

Precision Xtra Vs. Novamax Plus: Ketone Meter Evaluation

With the rise in interest in the n=1 experiment I’ve been blogging about since May 2012 (read my latest updates about it here, here, here and here), so many of you have begun testing your own blood ketones to see how well you are doing in pursuit of reaching that glorious state of “nutritional ketosis.” Attaining blood ketone levels of 0.5-3.0 millimolar is the optimal level for producing an appropriate level of beta-hydroxybutyrate to commence fat-burning and to serve as an excellent alternative fuel source for your brain and body for optimal performance according to what Dr. Stephen Phinney and Dr. Jeff Volek outline so beautifully in their outstanding MUST-HAVE 2012 book The Art & Science Of Low Carbohydrate Performance. If you haven’t already picked up your own copy of this book, then I cannot recommend it highly enough to you as an invaluable resource in your pursuit of living an optimally healthy low-carb lifestyle. As people have been shopping around for their own blood ketone meter, I’ve been getting a lot of e-mails from readers who have asked me for my recommendation between which of the two major ketone meters they should get to test their blood levels. Is there any difference between the Precision Xtra and NovaMax Plus blood ketone meters? I’ve personally tried both of these meters and have been using the Precision Xtra results to document my n=1 experiment. Let’s take a closer look at the PROS and CONS of each: **Precision Xtra Blood Ketone Meter** PROS: – Accurate and clear blood ketone measuring – Sturdy and strong test strips – More precise than urine ketone testing CONS: – Requires more blood than glucose testing – Test strips can be quite expensive – Not available for purchase in stores **NovaMax Plus Blood Ketone Meter** PROS Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of A Ketogenic Diet And Its Role In Cancer Treatment

The Benefits Of A Ketogenic Diet And Its Role In Cancer Treatment

Could a ketogenic diet eventually be a “standard of care” drug-free treatment for cancer? Personally, I believe it’s absolutely crucial, for whatever type of cancer you’re trying to address, and hopefully some day it will be adopted as a first line of treatment. A ketogenic diet calls for eliminating all but non-starchy vegetable carbohydrates, and replacing them with healthy fats and high-quality protein. The premise is that since cancer cells need glucose to thrive, and carbohydrates turn into glucose in your body, then lowering the glucose level in your blood though carb and protein restriction literally starves the cancer cells into oblivion. Additionally, low protein intake tends to minimize the mTOR pathway that accelerates cell proliferation. This type of diet, in which you restrict all but non-starchy vegetable carbs and replace them with low to moderate amounts of high-quality protein and high amounts of beneficial fat, is what I recommend for everyone, whether you have cancer or not. It’s a diet that will help optimize your weight and all chronic degenerative disease. Eating this way will help you convert from carb burning mode to fat burning. Dr. Thomas Seyfried is one of the leading pioneer academic researchers in promoting how to treat cancer nutritionally. He’s been teaching neurogenetics and neurochemistry as it relates to cancer treatment at Yale University and Boston College for the past 25 years.He’s written over 150 peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters, and has also published a book, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease: On the Origin, Management, and Prevention of Cancer. Ketogenic Diet Accepted as First Line Approach for Epilepsy; Is Cancer Next? The ketogenic diet has actually been used for managing seizures in children for qu Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Blood Strips, Milk Strips And Automated Milk Measurement Of Beta-hydroxybutyrate In Periparturient Dairy Cattle And Resultant Diagnoses Of Ketosis

Comparison Of Blood Strips, Milk Strips And Automated Milk Measurement Of Beta-hydroxybutyrate In Periparturient Dairy Cattle And Resultant Diagnoses Of Ketosis

Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84341 (Wilson), and The Dairy Authority, Greeley, CO 80634 (Goodell), USA *Corresponding Author: David J Wilson Department of Animal, Dairy, and Veterinary Sciences Utah State University, Utah Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory 950 East 1400 North, Logan, UT 84341, USA Tel: 435-760-3731 Fax: 435-797-2805 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Wilson DJ, Goodell GM (2013) Comparison of Blood Strips, Milk Strips and Automated Milk Measurement of Beta-Hydroxybutyrate in Periparturient Dairy Cattle and Resultant Diagnoses of Ketosis. J Veterinar Sci Technol 4:136. doi:10.4172/2157-7579.1000136 Copyright: © 2013 Wilson DJ, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology Abstract Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is a ketone measured in blood or milk of dairy cattle after calving for detection of ketosis. Blood test strips, milk test strips, DHIA milk meter collected samples and hand stripped milk samples, both latter milks tested with Fossomatic analyzer, were compared for BHB measurement. Blood and milk samples were collected on the same day from 446 Holstein cows between 1–14 DIM in 5 herds for BHB testing as described above. Most test methods had continuous results but one (milk strip) had categorical results (ranges of μmol BHB /L); analysis compared whether or not each pair of BHB tests categorized the same cows as ketotic or non-ketotic (concordant, C) or disagreed on their status (discordant, D). Blood strips detected 53 Continue reading >>

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

The problem with diets is that we think that one diet should be good for everyone. But research and N=1 experiments show that’s not the case. Learn about measuring ketones and ketosis to understand how your low carb or high fat diet is really affecting you. If there is one area of our bodies that is debated to extremes, with literally hundreds of differing strong opinions on it, it’s nutrition. For many, beliefs about nutrition and diet are tribal. We put ourselves in different camps and we war agains the other camps. Whether it be paleo, low fat, low carb, Atkins, high fat, low protein, vegan, raw vegan and so on. It’s exactly this sort of area where I see data as essential. Without data we have no hope of cutting through the maze of opinions to get to what really works. Part of the problem with nutrition and diets is that we tend to think that one diet should be good for everyone. But increasingly, research and N=1 experiments, are showing that that isn’t the case. And this is exactly why you should pay attention to today’s show. Today, we’re looking at what has relatively recently become the fastest growing nutrition or diet trend. The high fat diet. Also known in different guises as the ketogenic diet, or the low carb diet. And specifically how this can affect our different individual biochemistries, how we can measure “Ketosis” and other biomarkers to understand how our specific biology is reacting to it… and allowing us to troubleshoot and course correct when it isn’t getting the desired results we’re looking for from it. Today’s guest is Jimmy Moore. In 2004, Jimmy, at 32 years, weighed 410 pounds. Since then he has transformed his own biology, shedding all that additional weight with low carb and ketogenic diets. He has also interviewed n Continue reading >>

Comparative Performance Assessment Of Point-of-care Testing Devices For Measuring Glucose And Ketones At The Patient Bedside

Comparative Performance Assessment Of Point-of-care Testing Devices For Measuring Glucose And Ketones At The Patient Bedside

Go to: Abstract Point-of-care (POC) testing devices for monitoring glucose and ketones can play a key role in the management of dysglycemia in hospitalized diabetes patients. The accuracy of glucose devices can be influenced by biochemical changes that commonly occur in critically ill hospital patients and by the medication prescribed. Little is known about the influence of these factors on ketone POC measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the analytical performance of POC hospital whole-blood glucose and ketone meters and the extent of glucose interference factors on the design and accuracy of ketone results. StatStrip glucose/ketone, Optium FreeStyle glucose/ketone, and Accu-Chek Performa glucose were also assessed and results compared to a central laboratory reference method. The analytical evaluation was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocols for precision, linearity, method comparison, and interference. The interferences assessed included acetoacetate, acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, galactose, maltose, uric acid, and sodium. The accuracies of both Optium ketone and glucose measurements were significantly influenced by varying levels of hematocrit and ascorbic acid. StatStrip ketone and glucose measurements were unaffected by the interferences tested with exception of ascorbic acid, which reduced the higher level ketone value. The accuracy of Accu-Chek glucose measurements was affected by hematocrit, by ascorbic acid, and significantly by galactose. The method correlation assessment indicated differences between the meters in compliance to ISO 15197 and CLSI 12-A3 performance criteria. Combined POC glucose/ketone methods are now available. The use of these devices in a hospital setting requires careful considera Continue reading >>

Freestyle Optium Neo Blood Glucose And Ketone Monitoring System

Freestyle Optium Neo Blood Glucose And Ketone Monitoring System

Insulin Support Tools At Your Fingertips Introducing the FreeStyle Optium Neo System, with a choice of support tools especially designed for people on insulin. Finally a meter that’s as easy1 or as useful as you want it to be! Key Features Accurate blood glucose & blood ketone^ testing 1,2 Trend indicators highlight when your blood glucose patterns need attention Insulin logging helps you track your insulin doses Clear, sharp screen is icon driven & easy to read1 even in direct sunlight No chip or coding required Fast 5 second test time Small blood sample required 0.6 µl Individually foil-wrapped strips protect from air & moisture, are convenient to store & carry3 Meets current ISO 15197:2013 system accuracy standards1 FreeStyle Auto-Assist Neo compatible – download up to 1000 events & print or email reports Owner’s Manual Instructional How to Use Video Test Strips The FreeStyle Optium Neo meter uses FreeStyle Optium Blood Glucose test strips to check for blood glucose. It can also be used with FreeStyle Optium blood β-Ketone test strips to check blood ketone levels. Continue reading >>

Precision Xtra

Precision Xtra

SIMPLE BLOOD GLUCOSE & KETONE TESTING IN THE SAME METER The Precision Xtra system offers intuitive setup and simple icon-driven menus that help simplify blood glucose monitoring. The Precision Xtra system tests both blood glucose and blood ketone all with the same meter using the Precision Xtra blood glucose test strips and Precision Xtra blood ketone test strips. EASY, EVERYDAY TESTING Simple 2-Step Testing Insert strip, add adequate blood sample, and test begins Smart Icon-Driven Menu Intuitive setup and easy navigation Easy-to-Use Buttons Easy to review results—with ability to scroll back and forth PRECISION XTRA BLOOD GLUCOSE TEST STRIPS No coding means one less step Accurate results in 5 seconds Small sample size – only 0.6 µL Individually wrapped for easy testing on-the-go PRECISION XTRA BLOOD KETONE TEST STRIP No coding means one less step Accurate results in 10 seconds Sample size - only 1.5 µL Individually wrapped for easy testing on-the-go QUICK LINKS The Virtual Product Manual Owner’s Guide: English | Español Log Book Precision Xtra Glucose Test Strips - Instructions for use Precision Xtra Ketone Test Strips - Instructions for use Data Management Software Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Illustration of a dog's pancreas. Cell-islet in the illustration refers to a pancreatic cell in the Islets of Langerhans, which contain insulin-producing beta cells and other endocrine related cells. Permanent damage to these beta cells results in Type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, for which exogenous insulin replacement therapy is the only answer. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body's needs. The condition is commonly divided into two types, depending on the origin of the condition: Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called "juvenile diabetes", is caused by destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas. The condition is also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, meaning exogenous insulin injections must replace the insulin the pancreas is no longer capable of producing for the body's needs. Dogs can have insulin-dependent, or Type 1, diabetes; research finds no Type 2 diabetes in dogs.[1][2][3] Because of this, there is no possibility the permanently damaged pancreatic beta cells could re-activate to engender a remission as may be possible with some feline diabetes cases, where the primary type of diabetes is Type 2.[2][4][5] There is another less common form of diabetes, diabetes insipidus, which is a condition of insufficient antidiuretic hormone or resistance to it.[6][7] This most common form of diabetes affects approximately 0.34% of dogs.[8] The condition is treatable and need not shorten the animal's life span or interfere with quality of life.[9] If left untreated, the condition can lead to cataracts, increasing weakness in the legs (neuropathy), malnutrition, ketoacidosis, dehydration, and death.[10] Diabetes mainly affects mid Continue reading >>

Why Ketonix

Why Ketonix

Why Ketonix rather than a urine or blood test for ketones? As always there is a short and a long answer, the short answer is: Ketones are formed by breaking down fatty acids in your liver and can be used instead of glucose. When your body breaks down fat and creates ketones your body is in a state called ketosis. There are many advantages to using fat as energy source instead of sugar (carbohydrates). There are also many reasons for choosing a diet that gets your body into a ketogenic state, some therapeutic uses include the treatment of epilepsy, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, increased fertility and weight loss. Ketosis is not the same state as ketoacidosis which can occur when a person with diabetes type 1 has a very high blood sugar level combined with a high concentration of ketones. High blood sugar is caused mainly by sugar and carbohydrates, not fat. A ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates, moderate in protein and high in fat and it normalises the blood sugar in your body. Any required glucose in your blood, body can be produced from protein. Being in ketosis can have a huge advantage sports men and women. When your body has adapted to using fat as fuel, the muscles use fat and the brain and heart use ketones. The muscles and brain do not compete to get fuel as can happen when glucose fuelled. We have all seen the result of this competition for glucose, a phenomenon called bonking where athletes often collapsed just before reaching the finish line. Additionally the production of lactic acid is minimized when you muscles are burning fat for fuel. There are three main ketones used by the human body being acetoacetate, acetone and beta-hydroxybutyrate. Acetoacetate, is formed either from the breaking down of fatty acids in the liver or from t Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing

Ketone Testing

Ketones are a chemical produced by your body when, due to a lack of insulin, it is not able to use glucose as its source of energy, and instead start breaking down fat ••••• Ketones are a chemical produced by your body when it is not able to use glucose as its source of energy due to a lack of insulin. When glucose can’t be used as energy, your body will start breaking down fat for energy instead and this is when ketones are produced. This is a short term solution for the body as over time the level of ketones will increase and can become dangerously high. If this happens, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can develop which can be life threatening. Having ketones is more common in Type 1 than Type 2 diabetes. You may have continued high glucose readings because you are finding it difficult to manage your diabetes, have missed a few injections, you are ill, have an infection, or for any other reason. It is important to test your level of ketones if you have Type 1 diabetes and your glucose readings are above 15mmols/L. Checking for ketones may be advised by your healthcare professional as part of your diabetes management program. You can test your level of ketones by using urine sticks or blood test strips with a meter that can test for ketones. Not all meters have the ability to test for ketones and you will need separate test strips for ketones to do this. Blood ketone test results Normal blood ketone levels are slightly different from person to person. This table will help you decide if you need to do anything and what you should do. Remember, it is far better to be careful, so if you are not sure contact your diabetes care team straightaway. Blood ketone level What you should do Below 0.6 mmol/L Readings below 0.6 mmol/L are in the normal range. Follow your hea Continue reading >>

At Last: Nutritional Ketosis

At Last: Nutritional Ketosis

It took one whole week after my trip to CT to find my way back into nutritional ketosis (1,5-3mmol/L)! But now I am here… This means: Extra energy Less needed sleep Burning fat at maximum Not so hungry Optimal fuel for the brain Bad breath… So how can you turbo your way into nutritional ketosis? Eat lots, LOTS of fat (butter, ghee, coconut oil) Avoid: berries, nuts, fruit, alkohol, too much dairy Bullet coffee helps Eat only 2-3 times a day In South Africa this is where you can get hold of a blood keton measurer: M-KEM, Durban Road. (At the Durban Road off-ramp from N1 heading out in direction of Paarl). Price: R149.95 B-Ketone strips (Box of 10). Price: R129.90 That’s R12.99 per strip! In Sweden the strips cost R30 each… But it is a pricey hobby, but for me, so worth it. It is very motivating to keep track of what you eat and how it affects your body and definately helps weight loss! Continue reading >>

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