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Physiological Insulin Resistance Symptoms

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What is INSULIN RESISTANCE? What does INSULIN RESISTANCE mean? INSULIN RESISTANCE meaning - INSULIN RESISTANCE definition - INSULIN RESISTANCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults. Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose. Insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin action; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance may also develop in patients who have recently experienced abdominal or bariatric procedures. This acute form of insulin resistance that may result post-operatively tends to increase over the short-term with sensitivity to insulin typically returning to patients after about five days.

Physiological Insulin Resistance

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I have been doing a little reading on this subject but I`m still not sure if I have a handle on it or not and would like a little advice please. My understanding is as follows: A lot of t2`s have Pathological insulin resistance so that when we produce glucose our pancreas has to produce insulin but we don`t use it very well which means more insulin which causes weight gain and so on... A low carb diet produces less glucose which calls for less insulin which has to be a good thing presumably. However, carb restriction can also cause Physiological insulin resistance which, if I understand correctly, saves the smaller amount of glucose which is produced for the brain by making the muscles insulin resistant which leads to higher bg readings. Is my understanding anywhere close to correct and will these higher bg levels lead to a higher HBA1C ? Thank you for reading and please reply with your opinions. Chris. Hi, I have been doing a little reading on this subject but I`m still not sure if I have a handle on it or not and would like a little advice please. My unders Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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What Causes Antibiotic Resistance | What Is Antibiotic Resistance | How To Stop Antibiotic Resistance - Bacterial Resistance - Antibiotic Awareness Week. Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today. It is estimated that 5,000 deaths are caused every year in England because antibiotics no longer work for some infections and this figure is set to rise with experts predicting that in just over 30 years antibiotic resistance will kill more people than cancer and diabetes combined. Antibiotics help ward off infections during chemotherapy, caesarean sections and other surgery. They also treat serious bacterial infections, such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis, but they are being used for everyday viral infections, such as colds or flu, where they are not effective. Taking antibiotics encourages harmful bacteria that live inside you to become resistant. That means that antibiotics may not work when you really need them. The overuse of antibiotics in recent years means they're becoming less effective and has led to the emergence of "superbugs". These are strains of bacteria that have developed resistance to many different types of antibiotics HOW TO LOOK AFTER YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY: If you or a family member are feeling unwell, have a cold or flu and you havent been prescribed antibiotics, here are some effective self-care ways to help you feel better: Ask your pharmacist to recommend medicines to help with symptoms or pain. Get plenty of rest. Make sure you or your child drink enough to avoid feeling thirsty. Fever is a sign the body is fighting the infection and usually gets better by itself in most cases. You can use paracetamol if you or your child are uncomfortable as a result of a fever. Make sure to use a tissue for your nose and wash your hands frequently to avoid spreading your infection to family and friends. HOW LONG SHOULD YOUR SYMPTOMS LAST FOR? Here are a few guidelines to help you judge how long some common illnesses and symptoms should last for: Earache (middle ear infection) most people are better by 8 days Sore throat most people are better by 78 days Sinusitis (adults only) most people are better by 1421 days Cold most people are better by 14 days Cough or bronchitis most people are better by 21 days Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharma... https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamTh... https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449... https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. KEYWORDS: What causes antibiotic resistance What is antibiotic resistance How to stop antibiotic resistance Antibiotic awareness week Antibiotics and resistance Bacterial resistance to antibiotics Are antibiotics no longer working Are antibiotics not working as well Antibiotic resistance Whats antibiotic resistance Stop antibiotic resistance Stop bacterial resistance Antibiotic resistance explained simply Why do we get antibiotic resistance Antibiotics resistance 2017 Antibiotics resistance 2018

Insulin And Insulin Resistance - The Ultimate Guide

Insulin is an important hormone that controls many processes in the body. However, problems with this hormone are at the heart of many modern health conditions. Sometimes our cells stop responding to insulin like they are supposed to. This condition is termed insulin resistance, and is incredibly common. In fact, a 2002 study showed that 32.2% of the US population may be insulin resistant (1). This number may rise to 70% in obese adult women and over 80% in some patient groups (2, 3). About a third of obese children and teenagers may also have insulin resistance (4). These numbers are scary, but the good news is that insulin resistance can be dramatically improved with simple lifestyle measures. This article explains what insulin resistance is, why you should care and how you can overcome it. Insulin is a hormone secreted by an organ called the pancreas. Its main role is to regulate the amount of nutrients circulating in the bloodstream. Although insulin is mostly implicated in blood sugar management, it also affects fat and protein metabolism. When we eat a meal that contains carbohydrates, the amount of blood sugar in the bloodstream increases. This is sensed by the cells in the Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Insulin Resistance | How to Test for Insulin Resistance | P1 | Performing Blood Sugar Tests. Watch Now : https://youtu.be/MNSgUp4BJ80

Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults.[1] Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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