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Physiological Insulin Resistance Low Carb

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NEWGEN Direct Supplement https://www.newgendirect.com/4u MY RESULTS...Day 19 on Blood Sugar Diet Update...very long term Type 2 diabetes...stopped taking metformin in 2011...still ate plenty carbs fats protein Started Blood Sugar Diet 10th May 2017 - Fasting blood sugar 11.6mmol 10/05/17 FBS 11.6 mmol 17/05/17 FBS 5.0 mmol - Dramatic drop in 7 days - never happeed even when I was on metformin 18/05/17 FBS 5.1 mmol 19/05/17 FBS 4.8 mmol 20/05/17 FBS 5.7 mmol (7.20am) 20/05/17 Before evening meal - 4.2 mmol (5.40pm) 20/05/17 - 1 hour after last bite - 4.6 mmol (7.15pm) 20/05/17 - 2 hours after last bite - 4.8 mmol (8.15pm) 21/05/17 FBS 5.4 mmol 21/05/17 Before meal 4.3 mmol 21/05/17 2 hours after meal - 4.6 mmol 22/05/17 FBS 5.7 mmol 22/05/17 Before meal 4.6 mmol 22/05/17 2 hours after meal 5.1 mmol 23/05/17 FBS 5.3 mmol 23/05/17 Before meal 4.3 mmol 23/05/17 2 hours after meal 4.2 mmol 24/05/17 FBS 5.8 mmol Weighed 111 kg on 16th March 2017 - Doctors Surgery Weighed 99.9 kg on 18th May 2017 - Doctors Surgery Approx 2 stones lost No more weeing every hour at night My knee bursitis has 90% cleared up I have plenty of energy...etc etc etc I'm a new woman

Ketogenic Diet And Physiological Insulin Resistance | Low Carb Diet And Dawn Phenomenon

Dawn Phenomenon Ketogenic Diet and Dawn Phenomenon ketogenic diet Physiological Insulin Resistance low carb diet Dawn Phenomenon Low Carb Diet Physiological Insulin Resistance Physiological Insulin Resistance Dawn Phenomenon and Physiological Insulin Resistance Have you been on a low-carb or ketogenic diet for some time no and perplexed why your morning blood glucose readings are on the high end? Did you know that it is quite common for long-term ketogenic dieters to have morning fasted blood glucose readings that average 100-125mg/dl? This is rather common, albeit normal and sometimes referred to as Dawn Phenomenon or Physiological Insulin Resistance. Dawn Phenomenon is a natural rise in blood sugar because o a surge of hormones secreted at night which trigger your liver to dump sugar into your blood to help prepare you for the day. Another term for this is Physiological Insulin Resistance. A good description of this phenomenon comes from Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac: Very low-carb diets will produce elevated fasting blood glucose levels. Why? Because low-carb diets induce insulin resistance. Restricting carbohydrates produces a natural drop in insulin levels, which in turn activate Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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In this video I provide some of my current (June 2017) thoughts about physiologic insulin resistance induced by prolonged carbohydrate restriction. Blog: http://cristivlad.com

Physiologic Insulin Resistance

I'm hoping you can give me a simple response to a mess I'veapparently created in my own body. I've queried Petro Dobromylskyj,because it was his blog entry of October 2007 ( )that began to explain to me what was happening to my metabolism. Icontacted Dawn Tasher ( www.peelingbacktheonionlayers.com )because she was a strongly recommended nutritionist, and shesuggested I get in touch with Paul Jaminet, whose work I'd seen onthe internet. I've also had no response from him. My own doctor(s)don't seem to have answers. Like Peter, I am a veterinarian so amused to creative problem solving, often making difficult diagnoseson patients who are incapable of giving any history whatsoever ontheir health condition. So here's my story. I have been a lacto-vegetarian for 45 years.Added in eggs about ten years ago. About 13 years ago, my husbandembarked on the classic Atkins diet - as a vegetarian - to try tolose weight. After two days of eating extremely low carbs, he saidhe didn't care if he never lost an ounce on the diet because hefelt ten years younger and was dedicating himself to living a lowcarb lifestyle forever. (He did end up losing 35 pounds and keepingit off). "Ten years younger" sou Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d... Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O6rsdo The carb cycling diet is one of my favorite diets because it is one of the fastest way to burn fat while retaining as much muscle as possible. Most people don't know that carb cycling is actually a form of ketogenic dieting. The ketogenic diet is a diet that is lower in carbohydrates, which makes our body convert more dietary fat and body fat in to keytones in the liver. Which it then goes on to use for energy. Like I've said in many of my videos the human body prefers to use carbs as its primary source of energy. You're body won't produce too many keytones on a high carbohydrate diet, because your body won't need extra energy from fat due to the fact that its getting its energy from the more preferred carbohydrates. The only way for our body to use more fat for energy is by not having its preferred source there all the time. Eliminating carbs completely, however can have many drawbacks on our health and well being. Protein, carbs, and fats are all important and necessary for our body. So in comes the cyclical ketogenic diet aka carb cycling and also known originally as the anabolic Diet. There are many different approaches to carb cycling, but the general idea is that At some points of the week you're going to have a high amount of carbohydrates, and at other points of the week you're going to have a low amount of carbohydrates. Setting up the high carb and low carb splits will vary from one plan to the next. Some people may have very small changes in the amount of carbs they have from day to day. An example of this would be to set up a low carb, medium carb, and high carb day. Let's say 300 grams of carbs on high carb, 250 grams of carbs on your medium carb, and 200 grams of carbs on your no carb day. Another more advanced approach would be to do a High carb, low carb, and no carb day. The way that I like to set this kind of split up is by having a high amount of carbs on my high carb day, which for me would be somewhere around 400 grams, I would have one third or at the most half that amount for low carb day, and then try to get as close to 0 grams as possible on my no carb day and then repeat. An even more advanced approach would be to just cycle between high and no carb days. Or take it even a step further and do high, no, no. I don't really recommend having any more than two no carb days in a row. Make sure you don't jump to any extreme carb restrictions. An example of this is doing a 800 calorie diet when you could lose weight and maintain a better body composition with a 1500 calorie diet. Jumping to an extreme will not help you lose weight faster, in fact it'll probably backfire. Also in case you're wondering what kind of food you can eat on your no carb day, some great options are fish, chicken breast, ground turkey, protein shakes, Steak occasionally, and you can also have healthy fat sources like avocados, coconut oil, olive oil. and fatty fish like Salmon. For carbs make sure you are eating good sources of carbs like oats, brown rice, and sweet potatoes and avoid the junk food carbs. You can incorporate one cheat meal on one high carb day in the week, but that's it one cheat meal. You may notice that your strength and energy levels may go down while dieting like this. In fact you may feel like straight up garbage in the beginning. Understand that a lot of people feel this way when creating any kind of a calorie deficit. You're body will take a little while to adapt to using fat for energy instead of carbs. So the first 2 weeks can feel miserable. Give your body some time to adapt. A good idea is to plan your high carb days the day before a heavy lifting day, because this way you have stored glycogen available for your heavy lifts the next day. If you have no idea how many carbs to have on each day, try using a calorie calculator to find your maintenance macros and then add at least 50 grams of carbs to get the number for your high carb day. I'll include a calorie calculator in the description. Once you have your high carb number you should be able to figure out your low carb day. No carb day is obviously no carbs. After doing a carb cycling plan you may need to do some reverse dieting

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower leve Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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