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Peter Attia Ketosis

The Definitive Guide To Keto

The Definitive Guide To Keto

I use my Los Angeles surroundings as a barometer for changes in the mainstream approach to health, and it holds up quite well. Silicon Valley can claim to be the cradle of technology, but L.A. is definitely the cradle of diet and fitness trends; and the latest is most definitely keto. At the local cafe where every species of Malibu fitness enthusiast gathers to gossip and fuel up, I’m seeing fewer gels and energy bars, and way more butter coffees and discarded packets of the new powdered ketone supplement products. Sure enough, keto is entering into mainstream health consciousness everywhere. Google searches for “ketogenic diet” are at an all-time high. The stream of keto-related email queries and comments I receive has seen a major uptick. And early this year, a major publisher approached me with a keto book proposal, which I accepted. I dove headlong into a total immersion/participatory journalism experience where I walked my talk, and pricked my finger for blood tests enough times to get a little scar tissue going, for the past several months. The book is called The Keto Reset Diet and it’s coming out October 3rd. This is a comprehensive presentation to educate you on the science and benefits of ketone burning and to give you step-by-step guidance to go keto the right away, avoiding the common setbacks that happen when many adopt an ill-advised approach to something as delicate and rigorous as nutritional ketosis. You can pre-order a copy from major retailers right now. We are also filming a comprehensive online multimedia educational course to give you a guided immersion experience that will be available in 2018. Meanwhile, it’s definitely time to do a Definitive Guide…. To understand ketogenic diets, you must understand the conditions that promote ketos Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Friend Or Foe?

Ketosis: Friend Or Foe?

Ketogenic diets are getting a lot of attention these days and along with that attention comes a great amount of debate as to whether or not this metabolic state is ideal for individuals to purposely put themselves in. The information available is constantly growing and can be extremely confusing to a newcomer. The good thing about disagreement is that it is one of the best ways to fuel growth and progress. While there are some remarkable things people are doing to improve their health through ketogenic diets, there is still a lot we have to learn about it and the common misunderstanding of this metabolic state is what I intend to address in this post. For the sake of keeping this blog post short and sweet, keep in mind that this is a topic I will continue to build on. Ketosis, and all the dynamics associated with it, are so complex that it would be impossible to write about it all in one post. So where I post links to other, more thoroughly written articles, make sure to take action and read through them to better understand this subject. What does it mean to be in ketosis? The body can run on either glucose or fat (ketones) for fuel. Because the standard American has been told to fear fat and encouraged to consume a diet of at least 65% carbohydrates, it's safe to assume that a majority of the population are using glucose (aka sugar) for fuel. However, there is an alternative to this. It's called being in a state of ketosis which is when the body burns ketones (a byproduct of fat metabolism) to fuel the body. The most important thing to remember is that both are completely normal and mankind has been using both forms of fuel since the beginning of time to get us to where we are today. Without the ability to store fat on our bodies, and later tap into those fat stores d Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol (the Hyper-responder’s Ultimate Guide)

The Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol (the Hyper-responder’s Ultimate Guide)

Ketogenic Diet High Cholesterol: the Hyper-Responders Ultimate Survival Guide for dealing with super high cholesterol on a LCHF or Keto Diet. As discussed in my last article, the ketogenic diet may not be for everyone. One of those reasons is cholesterol and, although most people should experience an improved lipid profile whilst following a LCHF diet, it seems to be fairly common for a subset of people to see detrimental results, especially related to LDL. I am one of those unlucky people and, as a result, I’ve been doing a lot of research on what this is all about. If you’re in the same boat, fear not, things may not be as bad as you think and there are some reassuring things you should understand before you take any further steps. The rationale behind my desire to write about this stems from a very lengthy, confusing and frustrating experience with various GPs which, until now, has been without conclusion. To corroborate that my experience is not unique, and to set the tone for the article, please enjoy the words of Dr.Peter Attia, directly ‘borrowed’ from post 1 of 8 in his ‘The Straight Dope On Cholesterol’ series: “The topic bears an unsettling parallel reality to nutrition science in that virtually all health care providers have no understanding of it and seem to only reiterate conventional wisdom (e.g. “LDL is bad”, “HDL is good”)”. In summary, whilst the standard approach to cholesterol testing has its place, the science of cholesterol has moved on and, if you have high cholesterol, you must look beyond the pale. My objective here is to provide a comprehensive guide to support anyone experiencing issues with high cholesterol after adopting a ketogenic or LCHF diet. Thus, by reading this article you should have a much better idea of what Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Peter Attia’s War On Insulin

The Ketogenic Diet And Peter Attia’s War On Insulin

Being a marathon runner with type 1 diabetes is tricky business. Normally, I eat a very low-carb diet which helps me maintain fairly stable blood sugar. But before a long run, I need to have enough fuel for energy, but not so much that my blood sugar gets out of control. Because this balance is so hard to achieve, I’ve found carbo-loading to be the most difficult part of my long-distance running experience. I’m always looking for a better way to do it. It turns out, there may be one. Thanks to Peter Attia’s new blog, The War on Insulin, I’m learning all about the ketogenic diet. Peter Attia was born and raised in Toronto, Canada. He studied mechanical engineering and applied mathematics as an undergrad at Queen’s University. Shortly before starting his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering, a profound personal experience led him to medical school. At Stanford Medical School, Peter believed he would become a pediatric oncologist, but by the time he started his clinical rotations he realized surgery was his passion. Peter did his residency in general surgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland and while there spent two years at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the National Cancer Institute as a surgical oncology fellow. About six years ago, Peter became frustrated with certain aspects of medicine and health care, in general. In particular, he grew tired of the notion that doctors did little to keep patients healthy, and were basically the last line of defense against death once patients became ill. With the concept of “preventative medicine” on his mind, and missing quantitative and analytical problem solving, Peter left medicine to join the consulting firm McKinsey & Company. Today Peter is working full-time on his passions around nutrit Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? The Science Behind A Completely Different Way To Fuel Your Body.

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? The Science Behind A Completely Different Way To Fuel Your Body.

I’m sure you know that your body runs on glucose… but what if I told you there is an alternative, more efficient, energy source? No matter what kind of food you eat, the outcome is the same – burning food for energy. It’s a complex process, but the simple message is that by changing to a ketogenic diet, you can change the way your cells power themselves. Not only will you burn fat, but ketosis will also power your brain, heart and body more efficiently! So what is the ketogenic diet, and how can it benefit you? Read on and find out! Normally, your cells are powered by an energy molecule called ATP, made by using glucose. Ketosis is different – put simply, it creates molecules called ketone bodies, by using fats. It is a part of the normal bodily process, and it takes place regardless of how many carbs you eat. Ketone bodies, however, are a much more effective way of powering your body. It does require more energy to get going, which is why your body prefers the easier-to-use glucose, but ketosis provides far more energy in return. “We evolved to produce ketone bodies so we could not only tolerate but also thrive in the absence of glucose for prolonged periods of time. No ability to produce ketone bodies = no human species.” Your Diet, Digested Before we get into the differences between powering your body with glucose vs. ketones, let’s dive into the different ways your body converts food into energy. Carbs are composed of chains of simple sugars. Complex carbs are longer chains of sugars, and they simply take more energy to digest. Enzymes break carbohydrates down into glucose, the simplest sugar and main form in which energy is normally carried in your blood stream. -Glucose is an easy energy source – but isn’t steady or efficient. Consuming excess Continue reading >>

Ketosis Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis advantaged or misunderstood state? (Part I) In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that youll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of experts out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want toactuallyunderstand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I dont expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you.But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know its trendy to make blanket statements ketosis is unnatural, for example, or ketosis is superior but such statements mean nothing if you dont understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, lets agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, Ive deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies at sufficient levels, which Ill expand upon later. First, lets get the semantics correct. The first confusing thing aboutketosisis thatketone bodiesare not all technically ketones, whose structure is shown below. Technically, the termketonedenotes an organic molecule where a carbon atom, sandwiched between 2 other carbon atoms (denoted by R and R), is double-bonded to an oxygen atom. Conversely, the term ketone bodies refers to 3 very specific molecules: acetone, acetoacetone (or acetoacetic acid), and Continue reading >>

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

Update: I did a (failed) ketosis experiment on myself that you can read about here, here, here, and here. Jimmy Moore is dropping weight with the fervor of a college wrestler right now on his experimental ketogenic diet. In fact, he’s lost about 47 pounds in the last 3 months, and he’s still going. He’s an awesome guy and he’s been struggling with his weight for a while now, so I’m psyched for him to say the least. He gives updates every month or so on his progress, but he never tells his readers exactly WHAT he’s eating. I’m itching to know. Now, Jimmy isn’t strictly Paleo: he eats full fat dairy, so even if he did report to us what he was eating, it wouldn’t be super helpful to a lot of people. I got to thinking what a ketogenic Paleo diet might look like. Without all that cheese and cream to assume the fat positions, it’d require a lot more tallow, lard, coconut oil, and coconut milk, as well as the fatty meats, eggs, nuts, and avocados. Here’s a picture of one of Jimmy’s meals to give you an idea of the amount of dairy he’s eating (well, at least at this particular meal). I think that’s sausage, avocado, scrambled eggs, some sort of hot sauce, and heavy cream. By the way, I’m in no way criticizing Jimmy right now. If I could eat dairy, I probably would, and I think this meal looks amazing. What’s ketosis? Before I go any further with this, I’ll briefly explain what ketogenic means and why one would aspire to be on a ketogenic diet. Some say you need to eat fewer than 30 grams of carbs per day to be in ketosis. It may be fewer than that to get into a deep state of ketosis, and you must not eat too much protein either. So a ketogenic diet is high fat, low(ish) protein, and very low carb. More on that in a moment. When you are in ketos Continue reading >>

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is ketosis safe? The truth is that we can’t say for certain that it is 100% safe. Humans don’t understand everything under the branch of nutritional science and probably won’t for a very long time. As an individual, the only thing you can do is take a look at the research yourself and form your own conclusion. Personally, through the reading I’ve done and the experience I’ve had with the Keto diet, I’ve formed my own conclusion that ketosis is safe. Could I be wrong? Absolutely. But I could also be right. I’m willing to take that risk in order to follow a diet which could maximize longevity, well being and function. My personal conclusion shouldn’t matter to you though. You need to do your own research and come to your own conclusion. I’ve put together this post to organize all of the issues surrounding the safety of ketosis so that you can make your own decision. In trying to prove something to be safe there are two ways to go about it. Disprove the claims of danger Show evidence which may be correlated with safety This article will dispel the top 10 claims people make in an argument to label ketosis as dangerous. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. The following data is not meant to 100% prove or disprove the safety of ketosis. It’s merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional strategy we feel is best for ourselves. I’m not a doctor or a researcher. The following information is material I’ve collected in my attempt to feel confident following a Keto diet indefinitely. Most of it is sourced from doctors or authors although I have also included anecdotal accounts from experiences posted on message boards and Reddit. I know, much of the information here isn’t sourced directly from s Continue reading >>

Maybe It’s Time To Check Your Ketone Level?

Maybe It’s Time To Check Your Ketone Level?

Achieving ketosis is not required for most people to succeed on the Wheat Belly lifestyle. However, this can be an important issue to know about. Achieving ketosis is not just a means of accelerating weight loss, but also of enhancing mental and physical performance. You’ll experience this yourself, with heightened mental clarity, energy, and endurance in a ketogenic state. The grain-free lifestyle eliminates junk carbohydrates from the diet. – Tweet this. Some individuals find their weight loss efforts seem to plateau after some time on this diet. The occasional person will need to go the full low-carb mile and require a ketogenic state to achieve weight loss. To achieve a ketogenic state, virtually all carbohydrates will have to be eliminated in order to metabolize fats. An effective ketogenic diet is composed of near-zero (less than 20g net carbohydrates per day) intake of carbohydrates. This is combined with a higher than usual fat intake to quell hunger and divert the metabolism toward mobilization of body fat. You can detect ketosis by the fruity odor on the breath. – Tweet this. This being said, there are more accurate ways to confirm a ketogenic state. Urine can be tested using a dipstick for ketones, such as Ketostix. However, these can only detect ketones in the higher range, as are experienced by type 1 diabetics during diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening state. Urine monitoring is therefore less sensitive for identifying the subtler levels of ketosis experienced physiologically, which makes urine testing inadequate for weight-loss purposes. The most assured and precise method to assess blood levels of ketones is with a finger stick, just like checking blood sugar. The only difference is in the timing. Unlike the after-meal checks for blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Underwhelms In Carefully-controlled Trial

Low-carb Diet Underwhelms In Carefully-controlled Trial

An isocaloric, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was not associated with increased body fat loss compared with a higher carbohydrate diet, but was associated with a barely detectable increase in energy expenditure, a study found. The low-fat versus low-carbohydrate diet divide was thrown into sharp focus with the publishing of that study partly funded by the Nutrition Science Initiative, a group formed by prominent low-carb advocates including journalist Gary Taubes and Peter Attia, MD, the group's es-president, who can be found online sporting a t-shirt that reads "Praise the Lard." NuSI, as the group is known, is funding several studies, but the results from the first one were just published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition last week. It was a small trial, with only 17 participants, but it eliminated the usual problems with diet studies by controlling everything that the participants ate by keeping them in metabolic wards and taking measurements in very precise "metabolic chambers." Most remarkably, the study results did not clearly support one of NuSI's central precepts. The researchers leading it -- who were chosen by NuSI but who otherwise had no ties with the organization -- found less than spectacular results. In fact, they were so underwhelming that Kevin Hall, MD, the lead author of the study and a researcher at NIH, proclaimed that the evidence, when added to an earlier study on carbohydrate restriction, showed that the insulin carbohydrate model -- which holds that carbs are behind the obesity epidemic because they increase circulating insulin -- was essentially dead. "The combination of the two studies, on the metabolic side of things, basically falsifies the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis," said Hall in a popular YouTube video earlier this year, Continue reading >>

Dr. Peter Attia: Hack, Liar And All Round Disgusting Individual

Dr. Peter Attia: Hack, Liar And All Round Disgusting Individual

Dr. Peter Attia: Hack, Liar and All Round Disgusting Individual Apparently Peterand his buddy Gary Taubes just love themselves some crappy pseudoscience. Both of them are funded by the Arnold Foundation, with substantial ties to animal agriculture industry lobbying. Marion Nestle notes the Arnoldsworking relationship witha National Restaurant Association and the National Cattlemens Beef Association consultant. So lets go over the bogus arguments in this hour long lecture of idiocy. He starts off by citing a Siri-Tarino et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 study , saying no significant evidence could be found showing saturated fat intake is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) or cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Siri-Tarino meta-analysis only looked at prospective epidemiological studies. Weve known since the 1970s that epidemiological studies dont have the statistical power to show an association between saturated fat intake and heart disease. The only studies that have the power to show the relationship come from dietary change experiments. Cross-sectional epidemiological studies are expected to show a zero-correlation due to the wide variability of baseline cholesterol levels in a given population. This means they do not disprove the cause-and-effect relationship between saturated fat/cholesterol intake and heart disease risk, even if no cause-and-effect relationship is visible in the population data. He goes on to cite Chowdhury et al . in support of his nonsense. This study looked at a mix of observational and randomized control trials. Same issues again with the observational data, but the RCTs in this case only looked at supplementation of omega 6 and 3 polyunsaturated fats. So this tells us absolutely nothing about the role saturated fats pl Continue reading >>

Dominic D’agostino: Ketosis & Oxygen Toxicity – #187

Dominic D’agostino: Ketosis & Oxygen Toxicity – #187

Dominic D’Agostino is a neuroscientist, a researcher in the fields of molecular pharmacology and physiology, and assistant professor at the University of South Florida. His research on the impact of ketogenic diets on cell metabolism, and their neuroprotective effects on oxygen toxicity, is supported by the Office of Naval Research, US Department of Defense, and the Alzheimer’s Association. Dom is a member of the Aerospace Medical Association, the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Society, the Society of Neuroscience, the American Physiological Society, and also serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Applied Physiology, and as a reviewer for several other scholarly publications. He is one of the world’s foremost experts on ketosis and ketogenic supplements such as MCT oil. Why you should listen – Dominic comes on Bulletproof Radio, live from the Bulletproof Conference, to discuss his metabolic therapy research, how starvation can be beneficial for brain metabolism, how ketones and ketogenic diets can enhance performance, and the use of MCT oil and ketogenic supplements. Enjoy the show! Enter your email address in the box on the right to receive a free copy of the Bulletproof Diet, the Bulletproof Shopping Guide, and much more! Click here to download the mp3 of Dominic D’Agostino: Ketosis & Oxygen Toxicity – #187 What You Will Hear 0:10 – Cool Fact of the Day! 0:30 – Welcome Dominic D’Agostino 1:45 – Dom’s presentation at the Bulletproof Conference 2:17 – Metabolic therapy research 3:08 – Ketosis 4:00 – CNS oxygen toxicity seizures 7:30 – How starvation can be beneficial to brain metabolism 9:23 – Producing instant ketosis with ketogenic supplementation 12:00 – Medium Chain Triglyceride (MCT) oil 13:55 – Best time of day to us Continue reading >>

How To Lose Fat: Ketosis (keto)

How To Lose Fat: Ketosis (keto)

Are you losing weight or are you losing fat? Are they the same thing? Does it matter? But really, how do I achieve fat loss, QUICKLY? Welcome to the truth about fat loss series. Part I can be found here. Nutritional Ketosis or keto scares the crap out of people for some reason. Well for one it is very often confused and mistaken for Ketoacidosis, which is dangerous for those who are diabetic. TOTALLY DIFFERENT AND ACTUALLY DANGEROUS. A word from one of my favorite men on the planet: “What is diabetic ketoacidosis? When a diabetic (usually a Type I diabetic, but sometimes this occurs in very late-stage, insulin-dependent, Type II diabetics) fails to receive enough insulin, they go into an effective state of starvation. While they may have all the glucose in the world in their bloodstream, without insulin, they can’t get any into their cells. Hence, they are effectively going into starvation. The body does what it would do in anyone – it starts to make ketones out of fat and proteins. Here’s the problem: the diabetic patient in this case can’t produce any insulin, so there is no feedback loop and they continue to produce more and more ketones without stopping.” – Dr. Peter Attia Nutritional Ketosis, on the other hand, is when you put your body into ketosis on purpose by restricting carbs and switching your energy system from relying on sugar to relying on fat. So why else could keto make people so itchy? Maybe because it is so far of a departure from what they have heard for the past 20 years? Eat w(hole in your gut) grains Avoid fat Avoid red meat Get your calories from carbs so you have the energy to lose weight! And here we sit. Still chubby. Still hungry. Feeling pain both physically and emotionally. Extremely frustrated by the fact that we follow the Fo Continue reading >>

The Ketosis Promise Land

The Ketosis Promise Land

(Week 7-11) How the search for additional marginal gains led me to the path of tenuous benefits and brought me (almost) nothing but misery. While studying various aspects of LC way of living, It wasn’t difficult to stumble upon the term “keto-adaptation” or ketosis, that seemed to pop up very frequently, especially with relation in endurance training. This keto adaptation approach entails severely limiting your carbohydrate intake, usually to less than 50g per day, in order to teach your body metabolism to burn and use exclusively fat for fuel, i.e. to use ketone bodies instead of glucose. The body’s reliance on fat as a primary fuel in endurance exercise is the “holy grail” in sports nutrition, as even the leanest of athletes have enough body fat stores for a couple or Ironman races. The theory behind this approach was obtained from excellent book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance from Phinney and Volek and various internet sources, most notably from Peter Attia’s eatingacademy.com. The theory behind keto-adaptation seemed plausible and very compelling, therefore decision was unambiguous: bring on even more fat! I got myself a blood ketone body measuring device (Precision Xtra NFR Blood Glucose Monitoring System ), and after some additional tinkering with my nutrition, I managed to get myself into “keto-adapted” state. For me to achieve this, I needed to cut my carbs to less than 50g per day and limiting protein intake to fewer than 140 g (less than 2g per kg of body weight). Time wise it took me 7 weeks from starting LC to get to keto-adapted state. The results were most dramatically seen in my body composition. I leaned out even more reaching a body weight of 67 kg, lowest in 5 years. But most striking difference from a couple of w Continue reading >>

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