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Peter Attia Ketosis

The Peter Attia Approach To Dieting For Endurance Athletes (part One)

The Peter Attia Approach To Dieting For Endurance Athletes (part One)

The Peter Attia Approach to Dieting for Endurance Athletes (Part One) Ill start by declaring my bias from the outset. Im a fan of Dr. Peter Attia . So I was flattered when asked by TrainingPeaks to write this blog post, and even more honored when Peter granted permission for me to take on the task. However, please note that while Peters fine with me trying to tackle the topic, it does not imply his endorsement of the approaches in this article. Herein begins a two-part blog post to try to do the topic of low carbohydrate/high fat dieting justice. I first stumbled across Dr. Attias work during my own experimentation with lowering carbohydrates in my diet and when trying to understand the positive effects I observed it having on my blood pressure, fat oxidation and endurance performance. Like Stephen Phinney, Jeff Volek, and Tim Noakes, Peter is a pioneer in this area, and has an extensive website that details his work at EatingAcademy.com. Peter is a physician, a researcher, former ultra-endurance swimmer and cycling time trialist who continues to forge new ground in the areas of health and longevity. He has a super interesting background. A fellow Canadian, Peter took a different road toward developing his knowledge of exercise science than many of us in the field typically do. Peter is a self-confessed near high school dropout who was about to dedicate his life to the sport of boxing when a high school teacher inspired him to pursue undergraduate degrees in mathematics and engineering. Topping his class, he moved to Stanford medicine to complete his M.D., before becoming asurgical residentat The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Over time, Peter grew frustrated with certain challenges within the medical system, and eventually changed course to begin working privately. He shares Continue reading >>

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet For Athletes

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet For Athletes

The cyclic ketogenic diet for athletes is a smart way to have your cake and eat it too. It works well for both endurance athletes and strength athletes alike. A lot of you have been emailing me to expand more on the cyclic ketogenic diet. In my book The Ketogenic Diet for Athletes I discuss it briefly. But it is vital to get the basics correct first before expanding out on different variations. Once you are keto-adapted, THEN it is time to explore tweaking the system and experimenting with cyclic ketosis. You can’t do a cyclic ketogenic diet for athletes unless you are first in ketosis. To learn more about cyclic ketogenic diet meal plans, check this out: Nothing lasts forever. The body needs constant change and stimulus or it stops responding. As you know, you should not do the same training every day. To keep improvement levels high, it is good to do some slow and steady endurance training, then some high intensity intervals another day, then some strength work another day, then a rest day. Keep mixing it up. So to with your diet. If you eat the same thing every day, you will start to see a plateau. What “worked” before may start to find an equilibrium of less and less improvement. Make sure you continue to eat widely and from balanced sources. If you need some yummy keto food ideas, shopping lists and recipes click here Humans are designed for feasts and famines which has occurred throughout our evolutionary history. It is good and healthy for the body to have a change now and then. The cyclical ketogenic diet for athletes does just this. Dr Stephen Phinny and Dr Jeff Volek in their excellent book, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance explore this. They also believe for lifetime success, a cyclic ketogenic diet is useful. A Practical Approach To Continue reading >>

Peter Attia - Ketopia

Peter Attia - Ketopia

by Michael O'Neill | Jun 26, 2013 | video Peter Attias What if were wrong about diabetes talk from TEDMED 2013. This is his famous talk about the science behind diabetes and obesity, and how his own personal biases were influencing his judgement as a physician. Well worth watching.... by Michael O'Neill | Apr 20, 2013 | video Peter Attias TEDMED 2013 talk has been given some great reviews, but were going to take some time before its available on video. Until then, we have a teaser video that covers his own prejudism against the overweight and obese as a young(er)... by Michael O'Neill | Aug 21, 2012 | Uncategorized Perhaps nothing is more damaging to the new low-carber than the intentional spread of fear, uncertainty and doubt regarding the state of ketosis compared to the dangerous state of ketoacidosis. The former is a natural and healthy state of existence, the latter is a... by Michael O'Neill | Jun 27, 2012 | research Weve been fighting this notion that a calorie is a calorie is a calorie for some time now, but it looks like the establishment may be finally understanding the implications of its own research. In a new study published in the Journal of the... Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Potential Applications & Concerns

Ketogenic Diet: Potential Applications & Concerns

Ketogenic Diet: Potential Applications & Concerns Wednesday, 20 July 2016 08:37 AM Written by Andrew Wade In recent years, the ketogenic diet has emerged as a popular choice among extreme endurance athletes for a couple key reasons. Todays post will discuss an introduction to ketogenic dieting, what it means, the potential benefits, as well as potential concerns and obstacles. This post will not discuss the physiology of the process in detail. For those interested in a greater level of detail, I have posted links to some of my favorite resources on ketogenic dieting.Simply stated, the ketogenic diet is built for those interested in running on fat. As mentioned repeatedly in this blog, our body will use carbohydrates for activity first when they are available. Since they are such a common part of our diet, many go through life never considering another way to eat. But what happens when our body has no carbohydrate stores left, and none are in the diet? Our body adapts to use a fuel that is always available, fat. When the body has no carbohydrate, and does not have enough protein to make carbohydrate from, the body will begin to adopt fatty acids as the primary energy source. Metabolism of fat in the body produces a group of compounds called ketones, which can be used by all systems in our body, including the brain. As I may have eluded to above, it takes quite a bit of time to enter ketosis, and is not done without resistance from the body. Once in ketosis, most people report a return in energy and mental clarity, and our body runs on ketones without any significant problems. The application and interest in this diet with runners is fairly straightforward. The average person has enough carbohydrate stored to fuel activity for approximately 2hrs, or 15 miles (give or tak Continue reading >>

The Ketosis Promise Land

The Ketosis Promise Land

(Week 7-11) How the search for additional marginal gains led me to the path of tenuous benefits and brought me (almost) nothing but misery. While studying various aspects of LC way of living, It wasn’t difficult to stumble upon the term “keto-adaptation” or ketosis, that seemed to pop up very frequently, especially with relation in endurance training. This keto adaptation approach entails severely limiting your carbohydrate intake, usually to less than 50g per day, in order to teach your body metabolism to burn and use exclusively fat for fuel, i.e. to use ketone bodies instead of glucose. The body’s reliance on fat as a primary fuel in endurance exercise is the “holy grail” in sports nutrition, as even the leanest of athletes have enough body fat stores for a couple or Ironman races. The theory behind this approach was obtained from excellent book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance from Phinney and Volek and various internet sources, most notably from Peter Attia’s eatingacademy.com. The theory behind keto-adaptation seemed plausible and very compelling, therefore decision was unambiguous: bring on even more fat! I got myself a blood ketone body measuring device (Precision Xtra NFR Blood Glucose Monitoring System ), and after some additional tinkering with my nutrition, I managed to get myself into “keto-adapted” state. For me to achieve this, I needed to cut my carbs to less than 50g per day and limiting protein intake to fewer than 140 g (less than 2g per kg of body weight). Time wise it took me 7 weeks from starting LC to get to keto-adapted state. The results were most dramatically seen in my body composition. I leaned out even more reaching a body weight of 67 kg, lowest in 5 years. But most striking difference from a couple of w Continue reading >>

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Calorie counting is a great tool for people to use to get a rough idea of caloric intakes, as well as a way to pinpoint mistakes they might have made if they hit a plateau. You might have been told that counting calories is not needed on a ketogenic diet because it causes more weight loss than other diets. That’s not exactly true. Would you be burning more calories than a low fat diet? Most likely, but that’s because of your protein intake. What about high carb vs. low carb? The truth is, there are no studies that properly show a fat loss advantage between low carb and high carb diets. There’s been over 20 long-term studies done in the last 50 years trying to give a solid conclusion on this, but all of the results have been the same: there is no significant difference in weight loss between a low carb and high carb diet. [1][2][3] The Ketogenic Diet and How This Ties In The thing about a ketogenic diet is if you tell people to eat as much as they want, they will tend to eat slightly less than other diets. Naturally, you will eat less if you’re eating food that can satiate you easier. You will have more fullness from vegetables, satiety from protein, feel fuller for longer from the fat, and endure higher levels of thermogenesis from unprocessed foods. So what does that all mean? In a nutshell, it means that you will eat less food, and therefore less calories. Your body can dig into your fat stores, since you’re naturally restricting calories, and you’ll lose weight. With high carb diets, usually with a good amount of processed foods, you will see swings in blood glucose. This makes it easy for people to give in to cravings, and succumb to the “carb addiction” created from serotonin and dopamine. There are no magical metabolic advantages to a ketogenic die Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Underwhelms In Carefully-controlled Trial

Low-carb Diet Underwhelms In Carefully-controlled Trial

An isocaloric, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was not associated with increased body fat loss compared with a higher carbohydrate diet, but was associated with a barely detectable increase in energy expenditure, a study found. The low-fat versus low-carbohydrate diet divide was thrown into sharp focus with the publishing of that study partly funded by the Nutrition Science Initiative, a group formed by prominent low-carb advocates including journalist Gary Taubes and Peter Attia, MD, the group's es-president, who can be found online sporting a t-shirt that reads "Praise the Lard." NuSI, as the group is known, is funding several studies, but the results from the first one were just published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition last week. It was a small trial, with only 17 participants, but it eliminated the usual problems with diet studies by controlling everything that the participants ate by keeping them in metabolic wards and taking measurements in very precise "metabolic chambers." Most remarkably, the study results did not clearly support one of NuSI's central precepts. The researchers leading it -- who were chosen by NuSI but who otherwise had no ties with the organization -- found less than spectacular results. In fact, they were so underwhelming that Kevin Hall, MD, the lead author of the study and a researcher at NIH, proclaimed that the evidence, when added to an earlier study on carbohydrate restriction, showed that the insulin carbohydrate model -- which holds that carbs are behind the obesity epidemic because they increase circulating insulin -- was essentially dead. "The combination of the two studies, on the metabolic side of things, basically falsifies the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis," said Hall in a popular YouTube video earlier this year, Continue reading >>

Faq's

Faq's

Who should do a ketogenic diet? Let's be clear about one thing: there is no one way of eating that is appropriate for every person. Even the American Dietetics Association now admits that it is essential to take an individualized approach to formulating nutrition plans. So the answer to this question simply is: anyone who is curious to see what effect a low carbohydrate/high fat diet has on their body. Every body is different, and the only way to find out how your body functions and feels burning fatty acids for fuel (ketones) is to actually put yourself into ketosis. You can do this DIY (and we’ll help you, please see our blog, social media pages and be sure to download our free keto 101 guide) OR, if you lack the time or skills to shop and prepare keto food from scratch, then we’ve got great products for you! What if I’m pregnant or breast-feeding? Very low carbohydrate diets are not recommended for pregnant or breast-feeding women. We advise pregnant or breast-feeding women to consult with their doctor concerning all matters to do with nutrition; especially if it involves making major changes to your lifestyle. What if I’m diabetic? Similarly, we must stress that Ketologie products are not intended to treat any medical condition, and that you should consult with your (hopefully up with the play), doctor. Having said that, here are some quotes that may be of interest to anyone who is curious about LCHF diets and Type 2 diabetes: “For people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome, or even those who are overweight, the data are clear. Total carbohydrate restriction is the most effective therapy, more effective than other diets and more effective than most drugs.” Dr. Richard Feinman, Biochemist and author of The World Turned Upside Down: the second low-carbohyd Continue reading >>

Paleo Blog - Pack Of Packs

Paleo Blog - Pack Of Packs

Last week I answered Tiffany's emailed question how well I fared on a paleo-ized carb night approach . In a nutshell: For 6 days a week you eat super low carb and on one day with a time window of ca. 8 hours you need to stuff yourself with (if possible) healthy carbs. Initially I did well and then I experienced the carbo downfall equivalent to the Rick Santorum scandal. Yes, I sinned and it was uuuugly. This leads us to Tiffany's question number 2: Which program will help to lean out while still being able to perform in CrossFit? Please be always aware that the following report describes MY approach, tweaked to MY needs and MY metabolic quirks. You will still need to keep tweaking for yourself to make this work for you or it might not even work at all. As I established before, I do well on a low carb high fat diet. Well enough that I produce ketone bodies rather quickly. No cravings for sweets, stable mood and blood sugar level. If it wasn't for all the high intensity stuff I was doing at that time I could just stayed in ketosis, leaning out and not needing any carb refeeds. Alas, for all the fast-paced stuff I was doing at that time, the refeeds were necessary. But as soon as I went on a carb refeed I go through a carb/ sugar addiction relapse. Causing me to submit to carb cravings on low/no carb days. I would kick myself out of ketosis and feel miserable. I wanted to stay in ketosis but I needed to replenish my internal carb storage as well without causing in insulin tsunami in my system. Reminder: Too much insulin in our system inhibits the metabolization of fat as fuel. In very simple terms:Lots of sugar --> lots of insulin --> burn less fat, even gain more fat Although I'm not an active trail runner any more I still have friends in the trail running community. One Continue reading >>

How To Get Into Ketosis For Optimal Cognitive Performance

How To Get Into Ketosis For Optimal Cognitive Performance

How To Get Into Ketosis For Optimal Cognitive Performance SelfHacked has the strictest sourcing guidelines in the health industry and we almost exclusively link to medically peer-reviewed studies, usually on PubMed. We believe that the most accurate information is found directly in the scientific source. We are dedicated to providing the most scientifically valid, unbiased, and comprehensive information on any given topic. Our team comprises of trained MDs, PhDs, pharmacists, qualified scientists, and certified health and wellness specialists. All of our content is written by scientists and people with a strong science background. Our science team is put through the strictest vetting process in the health industry and we often reject applicants who have written articles for many of the largest health websites that are deemed trustworthy. Our science team must pass long technical science tests, difficult logical reasoning and reading comprehension tests. They are continually monitored by our internal peer-review process and if we see anyone making material science errors, we don't let them write for us again. Our goal is to not have a single piece of inaccurate information on this website. If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please leave a comment or contact us at [email protected] Note that each number in parentheses [1, 2, 3, etc.] is a clickable link to peer-reviewed scientific studies. A plus sign next to the number [1+, 2+, etc...] means that the information is found within the full scientific study rather than the abstract. Heres a sample protocol. Ive given more options below for you to tinker with, but if you just want clear and simple instructions, here you go. I think this is simple enough and doable Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To Keto

The Definitive Guide To Keto

I use my Los Angeles surroundings as a barometer for changes in the mainstream approach to health, and it holds up quite well. Silicon Valley can claim to be the cradle of technology, but L.A. is definitely the cradle of diet and fitness trends; and the latest is most definitely keto. At the local cafe where every species of Malibu fitness enthusiast gathers to gossip and fuel up, I’m seeing fewer gels and energy bars, and way more butter coffees and discarded packets of the new powdered ketone supplement products. Sure enough, keto is entering into mainstream health consciousness everywhere. Google searches for “ketogenic diet” are at an all-time high. The stream of keto-related email queries and comments I receive has seen a major uptick. And early this year, a major publisher approached me with a keto book proposal, which I accepted. I dove headlong into a total immersion/participatory journalism experience where I walked my talk, and pricked my finger for blood tests enough times to get a little scar tissue going, for the past several months. The book is called The Keto Reset Diet and it’s coming out October 3rd. This is a comprehensive presentation to educate you on the science and benefits of ketone burning and to give you step-by-step guidance to go keto the right away, avoiding the common setbacks that happen when many adopt an ill-advised approach to something as delicate and rigorous as nutritional ketosis. You can pre-order a copy from major retailers right now. We are also filming a comprehensive online multimedia educational course to give you a guided immersion experience that will be available in 2018. Meanwhile, it’s definitely time to do a Definitive Guide…. To understand ketogenic diets, you must understand the conditions that promote ketos Continue reading >>

Seyfried’s Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-start To Ketosis

Seyfried’s Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-start To Ketosis

Dr. Seyfried’s book, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease, inspired me to attempt a fasting jump-start to ketosis to see how long it takes to achieve his “zone of metabolic management.” Read on to see how it’s going so far! (I’m still alive…) Note: this post was originally published on Aug 1, 2013. It was edited to streamline content and improve graphics, then re-posted in June 2016, therefore some older comments may pertain to content that was removed during revision. Dr. Seyfried’s Ketogenic Diet for Cancer Caution: dietary experiments with fasting and ketosis are best done under medical supervision, particularly if you have a medical condition or take any daily medications. Everyone’s metabolism is different, so results will vary. Please see my post “Is the Ketogenic Diet Safe for Everyone?” After reading Dr. Seyfried’s book,1) I immediately felt sympathy for those of you out there who have cancer now, or who are cancer survivors worried about recurrence—were you hoping for a simple nutritional strategy, such as “eat more broccoli” or “add chia seeds to your morning smoothie?” Had I led you down a road of hope and then left you feeling disheartened when you saw how difficult Dr. Seyfried’s diet appeared to be? Let me try to make it up to you by trying his diet myself while you watch from the comfort of your living room. Seyfried’s Fasting Jump-Start to Ketosis Dr. Seyfried says the fastest way to achieve optimal blood glucose and ketone levels is to begin with a water-only fasting jump-start to ketosis for 3-5 days, and then embark on a low-calorie “ketogenic” diet, aiming for blood sugar levels of 55-65 mg/dL and blood ketone levels of at least 4.0 mM (see article 3 of my cancer series for more details). As a reminder, average blood Continue reading >>

The Beginner’s Guide To Exogenous Ketones

The Beginner’s Guide To Exogenous Ketones

Have you been wondering what exogenous ketones are? If so, you’re not the only one. The keto-dieting world has been buzzing with information about developments on exogenous ketones for awhile now, with many brands producing exogenous ketones that are used by Keto lifestylers around the world. But the majority of Keto dieters don’t completely understand what exogenous ketones are or how they can benefit their diet (or dieting options). In this post, we’ll provide you with easy to read information about exogenous ketones. With this knowledge, you’ll be able to utilize exogenous ketones in your diet, and teach others about their value. Let’s start with the label! The Definition of Exogenous Ketones Two words: exogenous and ketones. The word exogenous describes something that is developed from external factors; something outside of the usual production. So in terms of ketones, this means that exogenous ketones are synthetic: created outside of your body by scientists and then ingested for accelerated ketosis. We assume that you already know what ketones are, but just in case, we’ll give you a brief description of this term as well. Ketones, are organic compounds produced by in your body when your system experiences starvation, or when you restrict carbohydrates and increase fats, which inhibits a starvation-like state that produces ketone bodies. These ketones are an ideal fuel source for your body and your brain. Studies have suggested that when your body is in a ketogenic state, it utilizes oxygen more efficiently in the generation of energy. In short, ketones are secret weapons for anyone looking to take their body’s fueling system to the next level! To restate the point: Exogenous Ketones are ketone supplements. They’re created outside of your body and i Continue reading >>

Hrv And Ketogenic Diet Potential Sports Applications.

Hrv And Ketogenic Diet Potential Sports Applications.

Feb 25, 2016 | Uncategorized | 10 comments In our food obsessed society we are constantly bombarded by different trendy diets which often come with outlandish claims of great benefits. The one principle that professionals in the industry do seem to agree on these days is that there is no one diet that fits all. Thinking along the same lines, I have a strong interest in researching different diets and their applications, linking with nutrigenomics and functional testing, to ascertain which diets best fit a specific individual or athlete. With genetic testing now easily accessible and affordable, I was keen to test my own profile in order to help determine my optimal dietary choice. I now know that I have genetic mutations that can predispose me to cardiovascular disease, late onset dementia and metabolic syndrome. The ketogenic diet (KD) has been in clinical use for over 80 years primarily for the treatment of epilepsy1 symptoms, but recent scientific focus has been on its potential application in the field of neurodegenerative diseases and stroke recovery. It seemed a good fit for my genetic profile and hence my curiosity was sparked as to how the KD could be applied for health and in sport performance. That was my challenge to see if I could make it work. Its important to understand the difference between a Low Carb High Fat diet (LCHF) and the Ketogenic Diet. The former could be ketogenic but does not have to be, whereas the latter is in all cases LCHF and normally medium protein (LCMPHF). I am slightly baffled why most articles, papers and blogs fail to mention protein in the KD if protein levels are not taken into consideration this could end ketosis pretty quickly as around of protein can enter gluconeogenesis and protein also could have a pretty strong insulinoge Continue reading >>

More On Ketogenic Diets

More On Ketogenic Diets

"All these molecular changes suggest that a ketogenic diet is protective against brain injury. Remarkably, a long-term ketogenic diet does not seem to be associated with significant side effects..." From Shelly Fan's October 1, 2013 article published in our nation's oldest science-related publication, Scientific American (The Fat-Fueled Brain: Unnatural or Advantageous?) "I am concerned that the federal government, the media, the processed food manufacturers and billion dollar drug and biotech companies have commandeered our food supply and health care systems. Routinely, information and evidence about what truly constitutes healthy eating is altered or hidden from the public in order to advance financial or face saving agendas. And worse, people who aren't aware of the deceptions are being injured and dying because they follow this agenda driven advice. Since the privately owned Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetics Association) receives great sums of money from processed food manufacturers, they can't just suddenly start saying that a high fat, low grain diet is healthiest - they would lose all their funding from companies like Kraft Foods, Hershey's and Coca-Cola." From Ellen Davis' (Master's in Applied Clinical Nutrition) website, Ketogenic Diet Resource. "I remember exactly where I was sitting in a clinic at Johns Hopkins in 2002 explaining to (admonishing, really) a patient who was on the Atkins diet how harmful it was because of DKA. I am so embarrassed by my complete stupidity and utter failure to pick up a single scientific article to fact check this dogma I was spewing to this poor patient. If you’re reading this, sir, please forgive me. You deserved a smarter doctor." From a blog post (Ketosis – Advantaged or Misunderstood St Continue reading >>

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