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Peter Attia Ketosis

Ketosis: Friend Or Foe?

Ketosis: Friend Or Foe?

Ketogenic diets are getting a lot of attention these days and along with that attention comes a great amount of debate as to whether or not this metabolic state is ideal for individuals to purposely put themselves in. The information available is constantly growing and can be extremely confusing to a newcomer. The good thing about disagreement is that it is one of the best ways to fuel growth and progress. While there are some remarkable things people are doing to improve their health through ketogenic diets, there is still a lot we have to learn about it and the common misunderstanding of this metabolic state is what I intend to address in this post. For the sake of keeping this blog post short and sweet, keep in mind that this is a topic I will continue to build on. Ketosis, and all the dynamics associated with it, are so complex that it would be impossible to write about it all in one post. So where I post links to other, more thoroughly written articles, make sure to take action and read through them to better understand this subject. What does it mean to be in ketosis? The body can run on either glucose or fat (ketones) for fuel. Because the standard American has been told to fear fat and encouraged to consume a diet of at least 65% carbohydrates, it's safe to assume that a majority of the population are using glucose (aka sugar) for fuel. However, there is an alternative to this. It's called being in a state of ketosis which is when the body burns ketones (a byproduct of fat metabolism) to fuel the body. The most important thing to remember is that both are completely normal and mankind has been using both forms of fuel since the beginning of time to get us to where we are today. Without the ability to store fat on our bodies, and later tap into those fat stores d Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Ultimate Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is getting more and more popular, and for good reason – it’s helped a lot of people lose weight, get healthier, and get more energy. So, in this article, I’ll detail what the ketogenic diet is, what do you eat, what don’t you eat, who should do it, and how best to get started on a ketogenic diet. I’ll answer a lot of frequently answered questions in this post, from how it’s different to Atkins and Paleo to whether you need to take exogenous ketones and how to measure your ketone levels. A ketogenic diet can be a fantastic tool, but just like the handy hammer, it’s important to understand what it is, when to use it, how you can use it properly, and what to do when it doesn’t work. If you want to skip to a specific section, then just use the table of contents below: Table of Contents – Guide To The Ketogenic Diet Should You Go On A Ketogenic Diet?/li> What is a Keto or Ketogenic Diet? A keto or ketogenic diet is a diet that causes your body to burn fat (in the form of ketones) rather than sugar (in the form of glucose/glycogen). I’ll explain a little more in detail below, but you basically do this by eating a lot of fat and very little carbohydrates. There’s a lot of confusion about just how much fat, protein, and carbohydrates you should eat on a ketogenic diet, and that’s because there are now several types of ketogenic diets. Most of the research has focused on the very high fat (standard) ketogenic diet. But if you’re looking for weight loss benefits then a high-protein ketogenic diet might help more. If you want to just get on with the ketogenic diet, then feel free to just click here to get the ketogenic diet food list emailed to you directly. A Brief History of the Ketogenic Diet Let’s start with a bit of history so yo Continue reading >>

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet For Athletes

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet For Athletes

The cyclic ketogenic diet for athletes is a smart way to have your cake and eat it too. It works well for both endurance athletes and strength athletes alike. A lot of you have been emailing me to expand more on the cyclic ketogenic diet. In my book The Ketogenic Diet for Athletes I discuss it briefly. But it is vital to get the basics correct first before expanding out on different variations. Once you are keto-adapted, THEN it is time to explore tweaking the system and experimenting with cyclic ketosis. You can’t do a cyclic ketogenic diet for athletes unless you are first in ketosis. To learn more about cyclic ketogenic diet meal plans, check this out: Nothing lasts forever. The body needs constant change and stimulus or it stops responding. As you know, you should not do the same training every day. To keep improvement levels high, it is good to do some slow and steady endurance training, then some high intensity intervals another day, then some strength work another day, then a rest day. Keep mixing it up. So to with your diet. If you eat the same thing every day, you will start to see a plateau. What “worked” before may start to find an equilibrium of less and less improvement. Make sure you continue to eat widely and from balanced sources. If you need some yummy keto food ideas, shopping lists and recipes click here Humans are designed for feasts and famines which has occurred throughout our evolutionary history. It is good and healthy for the body to have a change now and then. The cyclical ketogenic diet for athletes does just this. Dr Stephen Phinny and Dr Jeff Volek in their excellent book, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance explore this. They also believe for lifetime success, a cyclic ketogenic diet is useful. A Practical Approach To Continue reading >>

Dr. Peter Attia: Hack, Liar And All Round Disgusting Individual

Dr. Peter Attia: Hack, Liar And All Round Disgusting Individual

Dr. Peter Attia: Hack, Liar and All Round Disgusting Individual Apparently Peterand his buddy Gary Taubes just love themselves some crappy pseudoscience. Both of them are funded by the Arnold Foundation, with substantial ties to animal agriculture industry lobbying. Marion Nestle notes the Arnoldsworking relationship witha National Restaurant Association and the National Cattlemens Beef Association consultant. So lets go over the bogus arguments in this hour long lecture of idiocy. He starts off by citing a Siri-Tarino et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 study , saying no significant evidence could be found showing saturated fat intake is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) or cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Siri-Tarino meta-analysis only looked at prospective epidemiological studies. Weve known since the 1970s that epidemiological studies dont have the statistical power to show an association between saturated fat intake and heart disease. The only studies that have the power to show the relationship come from dietary change experiments. Cross-sectional epidemiological studies are expected to show a zero-correlation due to the wide variability of baseline cholesterol levels in a given population. This means they do not disprove the cause-and-effect relationship between saturated fat/cholesterol intake and heart disease risk, even if no cause-and-effect relationship is visible in the population data. He goes on to cite Chowdhury et al . in support of his nonsense. This study looked at a mix of observational and randomized control trials. Same issues again with the observational data, but the RCTs in this case only looked at supplementation of omega 6 and 3 polyunsaturated fats. So this tells us absolutely nothing about the role saturated fats pl Continue reading >>

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Four years ago, I realized that I’d been duped. I’d been lied to about carbohydrates. Despite obtaining a graduate degree with advanced courses in human nutrition, biochemistry, microbiology, and exercise physiology, a sports nutritionist certification, and plenty of time with my face stuffed in dietary research journals, I was simply doing things completely back-asswards when it came to fueling my body. See, my physical performance on my “gold-standard” 50-60% carbohydrate intake was just fine. Performance wasn’t an issue. I was quite competitive and very fast in my triathlons, runs, swims, bike rides, and workouts. But I also had bloating. Gas. Fermentation. Wildly fluctuating energy levels. Extra bits of fat around my belly and hips. Inflammation. All the warning signs of high blood glucose. All the signs that I was sacrificing health and longevity for performance…all the issues I talk about in gory detail in my book Beyond Training. So I simply gave a finger to dyed-in-the-wool, orthodox sports nutrition advice that trickles down from companies like Gatorade, Powerbar, and the US Government’s Food Pyramid. I took a deep, deep dive into a more ancestral, natural form of eating. I started eating more greens. More vegetables. More nutrient-dense plants. And I combined those plants with oodles of healthy, natural fats like avocadoes, olive oil, coconut milk, seeds, nuts, fatty fish, grass-fed meats, and yes, even “weird” foods like bone broth, liver, sardines and many of these unorthodox meals and pantry foods. I began eating the “cyclic” low-carbohydrate diet that I outline in my book on low carbohydrate eating for athletes, meaning that I would save the majority of my carbohydrate intake for the very end of the day, and even then, I ate the clean Continue reading >>

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is ketosis safe? The truth is that we can’t say for certain that it is 100% safe. Humans don’t understand everything under the branch of nutritional science and probably won’t for a very long time. As an individual, the only thing you can do is take a look at the research yourself and form your own conclusion. Personally, through the reading I’ve done and the experience I’ve had with the Keto diet, I’ve formed my own conclusion that ketosis is safe. Could I be wrong? Absolutely. But I could also be right. I’m willing to take that risk in order to follow a diet which could maximize longevity, well being and function. My personal conclusion shouldn’t matter to you though. You need to do your own research and come to your own conclusion. I’ve put together this post to organize all of the issues surrounding the safety of ketosis so that you can make your own decision. In trying to prove something to be safe there are two ways to go about it. Disprove the claims of danger Show evidence which may be correlated with safety This article will dispel the top 10 claims people make in an argument to label ketosis as dangerous. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. The following data is not meant to 100% prove or disprove the safety of ketosis. It’s merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional strategy we feel is best for ourselves. I’m not a doctor or a researcher. The following information is material I’ve collected in my attempt to feel confident following a Keto diet indefinitely. Most of it is sourced from doctors or authors although I have also included anecdotal accounts from experiences posted on message boards and Reddit. I know, much of the information here isn’t sourced directly from s Continue reading >>

Seyfried’s Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-start To Ketosis

Seyfried’s Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-start To Ketosis

Dr. Seyfried’s book, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease, inspired me to attempt a fasting jump-start to ketosis to see how long it takes to achieve his “zone of metabolic management.” Read on to see how it’s going so far! (I’m still alive…) Note: this post was originally published on Aug 1, 2013. It was edited to streamline content and improve graphics, then re-posted in June 2016, therefore some older comments may pertain to content that was removed during revision. Dr. Seyfried’s Ketogenic Diet for Cancer Caution: dietary experiments with fasting and ketosis are best done under medical supervision, particularly if you have a medical condition or take any daily medications. Everyone’s metabolism is different, so results will vary. Please see my post “Is the Ketogenic Diet Safe for Everyone?” After reading Dr. Seyfried’s book,1) I immediately felt sympathy for those of you out there who have cancer now, or who are cancer survivors worried about recurrence—were you hoping for a simple nutritional strategy, such as “eat more broccoli” or “add chia seeds to your morning smoothie?” Had I led you down a road of hope and then left you feeling disheartened when you saw how difficult Dr. Seyfried’s diet appeared to be? Let me try to make it up to you by trying his diet myself while you watch from the comfort of your living room. Seyfried’s Fasting Jump-Start to Ketosis Dr. Seyfried says the fastest way to achieve optimal blood glucose and ketone levels is to begin with a water-only fasting jump-start to ketosis for 3-5 days, and then embark on a low-calorie “ketogenic” diet, aiming for blood sugar levels of 55-65 mg/dL and blood ketone levels of at least 4.0 mM (see article 3 of my cancer series for more details). As a reminder, average blood Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Athletic Performance: More Than Fat Loss

Ketosis And Athletic Performance: More Than Fat Loss

The above video is a presentation by Peter Attia, M.D. His talk is somewhat technical, but I always write blog posts hoping 20,000 people will *love* them, not that 1,000,000 will *like* them. In this presentation, you will learn (in my words, not Pete’s): – More about nutrition than most MDs learn in med school. – How ketosis-adapted performance can aid fat loss and high-altitude resilience. – Why the calorie estimates on treadmills and stationary bikes are complete BS. – The three primary systems of energy production and basic organic chemistry, both of which aid understanding of all athletics. Even if you struggle a little with vocabulary, the first 30 minutes are well worth watching a few times. This talk made me immediately want to jump back on the Cyclical (or “Cyclic”) Ketogenic Diet (CKD), which was conceptually introduced to me in 1996-1998 by the writing of Lyle McDonald, Dr. Mauro Di Pasquale, and the late Dan Duchaine. It’s incredible for simultaneous fat loss and lean muscle gain, though perhaps needlessly complicated for non-athletes. I usually limited the carb-reloading period to 12-18 hours after a glycogen depletion workout on Saturdays, though I experimented with moderate Wed night carb-ups while training for sports like kickboxing. If you’ve experimented with ketosis, what was your approach and experience? Pros and cons? For additional reading, I suggest the following posts by Dr. Attia: ### Odds and Ends: This week, I’m using my birthday to change the world with @charitywater. Please click here to take a look. You could do the same. Please check out Tribe of Mentors, my newest book, which shares short, tactical life advice from 100+ world-class performers. Many of the world's most famous entrepreneurs, athletes, investors, poker p Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol (the Hyper-responder’s Ultimate Guide)

The Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol (the Hyper-responder’s Ultimate Guide)

Ketogenic Diet High Cholesterol: the Hyper-Responders Ultimate Survival Guide for dealing with super high cholesterol on a LCHF or Keto Diet. As discussed in my last article, the ketogenic diet may not be for everyone. One of those reasons is cholesterol and, although most people should experience an improved lipid profile whilst following a LCHF diet, it seems to be fairly common for a subset of people to see detrimental results, especially related to LDL. I am one of those unlucky people and, as a result, I’ve been doing a lot of research on what this is all about. If you’re in the same boat, fear not, things may not be as bad as you think and there are some reassuring things you should understand before you take any further steps. The rationale behind my desire to write about this stems from a very lengthy, confusing and frustrating experience with various GPs which, until now, has been without conclusion. To corroborate that my experience is not unique, and to set the tone for the article, please enjoy the words of Dr.Peter Attia, directly ‘borrowed’ from post 1 of 8 in his ‘The Straight Dope On Cholesterol’ series: “The topic bears an unsettling parallel reality to nutrition science in that virtually all health care providers have no understanding of it and seem to only reiterate conventional wisdom (e.g. “LDL is bad”, “HDL is good”)”. In summary, whilst the standard approach to cholesterol testing has its place, the science of cholesterol has moved on and, if you have high cholesterol, you must look beyond the pale. My objective here is to provide a comprehensive guide to support anyone experiencing issues with high cholesterol after adopting a ketogenic or LCHF diet. Thus, by reading this article you should have a much better idea of what Continue reading >>

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

The Ketosis Promise Land

The Ketosis Promise Land

(Week 7-11) How the search for additional marginal gains led me to the path of tenuous benefits and brought me (almost) nothing but misery. While studying various aspects of LC way of living, It wasn’t difficult to stumble upon the term “keto-adaptation” or ketosis, that seemed to pop up very frequently, especially with relation in endurance training. This keto adaptation approach entails severely limiting your carbohydrate intake, usually to less than 50g per day, in order to teach your body metabolism to burn and use exclusively fat for fuel, i.e. to use ketone bodies instead of glucose. The body’s reliance on fat as a primary fuel in endurance exercise is the “holy grail” in sports nutrition, as even the leanest of athletes have enough body fat stores for a couple or Ironman races. The theory behind this approach was obtained from excellent book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance from Phinney and Volek and various internet sources, most notably from Peter Attia’s eatingacademy.com. The theory behind keto-adaptation seemed plausible and very compelling, therefore decision was unambiguous: bring on even more fat! I got myself a blood ketone body measuring device (Precision Xtra NFR Blood Glucose Monitoring System ), and after some additional tinkering with my nutrition, I managed to get myself into “keto-adapted” state. For me to achieve this, I needed to cut my carbs to less than 50g per day and limiting protein intake to fewer than 140 g (less than 2g per kg of body weight). Time wise it took me 7 weeks from starting LC to get to keto-adapted state. The results were most dramatically seen in my body composition. I leaned out even more reaching a body weight of 67 kg, lowest in 5 years. But most striking difference from a couple of w Continue reading >>

Faq's

Faq's

Who should do a ketogenic diet? Let's be clear about one thing: there is no one way of eating that is appropriate for every person. Even the American Dietetics Association now admits that it is essential to take an individualized approach to formulating nutrition plans. So the answer to this question simply is: anyone who is curious to see what effect a low carbohydrate/high fat diet has on their body. Every body is different, and the only way to find out how your body functions and feels burning fatty acids for fuel (ketones) is to actually put yourself into ketosis. You can do this DIY (and we’ll help you, please see our blog, social media pages and be sure to download our free keto 101 guide) OR, if you lack the time or skills to shop and prepare keto food from scratch, then we’ve got great products for you! What if I’m pregnant or breast-feeding? Very low carbohydrate diets are not recommended for pregnant or breast-feeding women. We advise pregnant or breast-feeding women to consult with their doctor concerning all matters to do with nutrition; especially if it involves making major changes to your lifestyle. What if I’m diabetic? Similarly, we must stress that Ketologie products are not intended to treat any medical condition, and that you should consult with your (hopefully up with the play), doctor. Having said that, here are some quotes that may be of interest to anyone who is curious about LCHF diets and Type 2 diabetes: “For people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome, or even those who are overweight, the data are clear. Total carbohydrate restriction is the most effective therapy, more effective than other diets and more effective than most drugs.” Dr. Richard Feinman, Biochemist and author of The World Turned Upside Down: the second low-carbohyd Continue reading >>

The Only Diet You Should Ever Consider (ketogenic Diet)

The Only Diet You Should Ever Consider (ketogenic Diet)

You are what you eat. If you feel like shit – that’s because you eat like shit. Lately (last 3-4 months) I’ve been running several experiments to find a diet on which I can perform optimally. I’m a big believer that health is one of the key ingredients for a better life; If your nutrition is in order, you’ll have more energy. If you have more energy, your brain functions better. If your brain functions better, you make better choices. Your life quality is the product of your choices. Better input, better output. Simple, right? There’s a lot of conflicting opinions on this topic, but I’ve finally settled on a diet that seems to work great. In this article I’ll go in-depth on the ketogenic diet. I’m convinced that a diet, high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbohydrates is optimal for (almost) anyone. If the whole world would switch to this diet, we’d see a dramatic decline in health expenses globally (+-500B/year) I’ll also be using a Color code in this article, like so: Difficult words that make me feel smart That will be all. —————————————————- What Is A Ketogenic Diet? A ketogenic diet is a diet that is high in fat, moderate in protein and low (or no) carbs. It’s based on the premise that humans were never designed to eat so much damn carbs. In the paleolithic era, carbohydrates were only available seasonally. To supply food for a constantly growing population, we’ve turned to (cheaper) mass production of corn, wheat, soy and other modified crops (crap(s)). This hasn’t only degraded the quality of grains but also the amount it represents in our diet. Literally turning the food pyramid upside-down since agriculture became the established norm. Grains are cheaper to produce and maintain, compared to Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

Ketones are a beneficial product of fat metabolism in the body. When carbohydrate intake is restricted, it lowers blood sugar and insulin levels. As insulin levels fall and energy is needed, fatty acids flow from the fat cells into the bloodstream and are taken up by various cells and metabolized in a process called beta-oxidation. The end result of beta-oxidation is a molecule called acetyl-coA, and as more fatty acids are released and metabolized, acetyl-coA levels in the cells rise. This causes a sort of metabolic “feedback loop” which triggers liver cells to shunt excess acetyl-Coa into ketogenesis, or the making of ketone bodies. Once created, the liver dumps the ketone bodies into the blood stream and they are taken up by skeletal and heart muscle cells at rates of availability. In addition, the brain begins to use ketones as an alternate fuel when blood levels are high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com There are three major types of ketone bodies present in the human blood stream when the metabolic process of ketosis is dominant: Acetoacetate (AcAc) is created first β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is created from acetoacetate Acetone is a spontaneously created side product of acetoacetate In times of starvation, or a low carbohydrate intake resulting in low insulin levels, ketone bodies supply up to 50% of the energy requirements for most body tissues, and up to 70% of the energy required by the brain. Glucose is the main source of fuel for neurons when the diet is high in carbohydrates. But when carbs are restricted, ketogenesis becomes the primary fuel process for most cells. During fasting or low carbohydrate intake, levels of ketone bodies in the blood stream can Continue reading >>

Ketosis Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis advantaged or misunderstood state? (Part I) In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that youll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of experts out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want toactuallyunderstand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I dont expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you.But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know its trendy to make blanket statements ketosis is unnatural, for example, or ketosis is superior but such statements mean nothing if you dont understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, lets agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, Ive deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies at sufficient levels, which Ill expand upon later. First, lets get the semantics correct. The first confusing thing aboutketosisis thatketone bodiesare not all technically ketones, whose structure is shown below. Technically, the termketonedenotes an organic molecule where a carbon atom, sandwiched between 2 other carbon atoms (denoted by R and R), is double-bonded to an oxygen atom. Conversely, the term ketone bodies refers to 3 very specific molecules: acetone, acetoacetone (or acetoacetic acid), and Continue reading >>

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