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Pathophysiology Of Hypokalemia In Dka

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Pem Pearls: Treatment Of Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis And The Two-bag Method

Insulin does MANY things in the body, but the role we care about in the Emergency Department is glucose regulation. Insulin allows cells to take up glucose from the blood stream, inhibits liver glucose production, increases glycogen storage, and increases lipid production. When insulin is not present, such as in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM), all of the opposite effects occur. A lack of insulin causes the following downstream effects: Prevents glucose from being used as an energy source – Free fatty acids are used instead and produce ketoacids during metabolism. Causes a surge of stress hormones and induces gluconeogenesis – When blood glucose levels are elevated, the kidneys cannot absorb all of the glucose from the urine, and the extra glucose in the urine causes polyuria, even in the setting of dehydration. In addition, acidosis causes potassium to shift out of cells into the blood, and the combination of this with dehydration causes the body to preferentially retain sodium at the expense of potassium.1,2 When insulin homeostasis is disrupted and decompensates, patients are at risk for developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). All of the following criteria are re Continue reading >>

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  1. metalmd06

    Does acute DKA cause hyperkalemia, or is the potassium normal or low due to osmotic diuresis? I get the acute affect of metabolic acidosis on potassium (K+ shifts from intracellular to extracellular compartments). According to MedEssentials, the initial response (<24 hours) is increased serum potassium. The chronic effect occuring within 24 hours is a compensatory increase in Aldosterone that normalizes or ultimatley decreases the serum K+. Then it says on another page that because of osmotic diuresis, there is K+ wasting with DKA. On top of that, I had a question about a diabetic patient in DKA with signs of hyperkalemia. Needless to say, I'm a bit confused. Any help is appreciated.

  2. FutureDoc4

    I remember this being a tricky point:
    1) DKA leads to a decreased TOTAL body K+ (due to diuresis) (increase urine flow, increase K+ loss)
    2) Like you said, during DKA, acidosis causes an exchange of H+/K+ leading to hyperkalemia.
    So, TOTAL body K+ is low, but the patient presents with hyperkalemia. Why is this important? Give, insulin, pushes the K+ back into the cells and can quickly precipitate hypokalemia and (which we all know is bad). Hope that is helpful.

  3. Cooolguy

    DKA-->Anion gap M. Acidosis-->K+ shift to extracellular component--> hyperkalemia-->symptoms and signs
    DKA--> increased osmoles-->Osmotic diuresis-->loss of K+ in urine-->decreased total body K+ (because more has been seeped from the cells)
    --dont confuse total body K+ with EC K+
    Note: osmotic diuresis also causes polyuria, ketonuria, glycosuria, and loss of Na+ in urine--> Hyponatremia
    DKA tx: Insulin (helps put K+ back into cells), and K+ (to replenish the low total potassium
    Hope it helps

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. DKA occurs predominantly in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, but 10% to 30% of cases occur in newly diagnosed type 2 (non–insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, especially in African Americans and Hispanics.1,2 Between 1993 and 2003, the yearly rate of U.S. ED visits for DKA was 64 per 10,000 with a trend toward an increased rate of visits among the African American population compared with the Caucasian population.3 Europe has a comparable incidence. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of DKA and an aggressive, uniform approach to its diagnosis and management have reduced mortality to <5% of reported episodes in experienced centers.4 However, mortality is higher in the elderly due to underlying renal disease or coexisting infection and in the presence of coma or hypotension. Figure 220-1 illustrates the complex relationships between insulin and counterregulatory hormones. DKA is a response to cellular starvation brought on by relative insulin deficiency and counterregulatory or catabolic hormone excess (Figure 220-1). Insulin is the only anabolic hormo Continue reading >>

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  1. * DKA explanation

    * DKA explanation

    Below you will find a terrific explanation of DKA from one of the instructors at Med School Tutors. If you like what you see and may be interested in learning more about one-on-one instruction from MST, then please visit their website at www.medschooltutors.com
    In order to understand how to treat DKA, it is useful to first understand what is going on in the body when DKA develops. First of all, DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) typically develops when a Type I diabetic does not take his or her insulin for a prolonged period of time. It may also be the presentation for new onset diabetes. Because these patients are insulin deficient, they are not able to take up glucose into their cells. This results in two important consequences: 1)glucose builds up in the blood and causes hyperglycemia and 2)the body's cells are forced to breakdown fat for energy, instead of glucose.
    These are very significant consequences... The hyperglycemia results in an osmotic diuresis, because the proximal tubule of the kidney can't reabsorb all the glucose filtered into the nephron. What is osmotic diuresis? Simply that the hyperglycemia (usually >300) causes the body to excrete lots and lots of water, because the osmotic pull of all the glucose particles prevents the reabsorbtion of water in the collecting duct. This means that patients with DKA are peeing their brains out!! They pee out sodium, potassium, and water.. And are therefore, very very very DEHYDRATED, sodium depleted, and potassium depleted.
    Now for the metabolism end of things... The body cells are forced to metabolize fat for energy rather than glucose. How do they accomplish this? - beta-oxidation of fatty acids. This results in excess production of ketone bodies which deplete available acid buffers. This causes a significant metabolic acidosis, with a high anion gap due to the presence of ketoacids. The acidosis causes potassium to shift from the intracellular space to the extracellular space. This may result in a normal or high serum potassium level. This normal or high potassium level masks what is typically significant potassium depletion because the person was peeing all their potassium out as a result of the uncontrolled hyperglycemia.
    So what are we going to do now? I will give a very brief answer for now, expect people to ask questions in the meantime, and then provide a more thorough approach to treatment in the coming days.
    1)Give the patient tons of normal saline. Why? - because your patient is dehydrated as all hell. They have been peeing out every last drop of water because of their severe uncontrolled hyperglycemia. These patients require liters of fluid to replenish all the fluid they've lost as a result of the osmotic diuresis.
    2)Give them insulin. Why? - NOT because it will lower the blood glucose level, but because it will cause a shift away from fat metabolism and toward glucose metabolism. This will slow the production of ketone bodies which are precipitating the metabolic acidosis. Thus, I will repeat, we give insulin to shift away from fat metabolism and stop the production of ketone bodies.
    3)Give the patient potassium. Why? - As we discussed earlier, the person has been peeing out all of their potassium stores and are overall very potassium depleted, despite having normal or high serum potassium levels to begin with. In addition to being potassium depleted, the insulin you are giving will cause a shift of potassium from the extracellular space to the intracellular space, which will drop the serum potassium. Thus, we give DKA patients potassium way before they become hypokalemic.
    4)Give the patient dextrose. Why? - They insulin you are giving the patient is obviously going to cause the serum glucose to decrease. We give glucose to prevent hypoglycemia as we continue to give insulin.
    How do we know when we are finished treating these patients? - When the anion gap returns to normal.
    That's all for now. Please ask any questions you have. I will be giving more specifics about DKA management in the near future.
    PS: Does anyone know the dangerous consequence of giving DKA patients fluid too rapidly? What are the symptoms this may cause, and what is the pathophysiology behind these symptoms?

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Snap Shot A 12 year old boy, previously healthy, is admitted to the hospiral after 2 days of polyuria, polyphagia, nausea, vomting and abdominal pain. Temp is 37, BP 103/63, HR 112, RR 30. Physical exam shows a lethargic boy. Glucose is 534, Potasium is 5.9; WBC 16,000, pH is 7.13, PCO2 is 20 mmHg, PO2 is 90 mmHg. Introduction Results from absolute deficiency in insulin surge in counterregulatory homones (glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine) results in hyperglycemia and ketonemia Most common in type I diabetes Precipitated by infections drugs (steroids, thiazide diuretics) noncompliance pancreatitis Presentation Symptoms vomiting abdominal pain fruity, acetone odor severely dehydrated cerebral edema associated with high mortality in pediatric patients Evaluation Diagnostic criteria blood glucose levels > 250 mg/dL Arterial pH < 7.3 expect to see an increase in free calcium since the excess hydrogen displaces calcium from albumin Serum bicarbonate < 15mEq/L Moderate ketonuria and ketonemia Labs show: Treatment Fluids Insulin with glucose give insulin until ketones are gone, even after glucose normalizes or is below normal Replace potasium for hypokalemia caused by too much potas Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. * DKA explanation

    * DKA explanation

    Below you will find a terrific explanation of DKA from one of the instructors at Med School Tutors. If you like what you see and may be interested in learning more about one-on-one instruction from MST, then please visit their website at www.medschooltutors.com
    In order to understand how to treat DKA, it is useful to first understand what is going on in the body when DKA develops. First of all, DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) typically develops when a Type I diabetic does not take his or her insulin for a prolonged period of time. It may also be the presentation for new onset diabetes. Because these patients are insulin deficient, they are not able to take up glucose into their cells. This results in two important consequences: 1)glucose builds up in the blood and causes hyperglycemia and 2)the body's cells are forced to breakdown fat for energy, instead of glucose.
    These are very significant consequences... The hyperglycemia results in an osmotic diuresis, because the proximal tubule of the kidney can't reabsorb all the glucose filtered into the nephron. What is osmotic diuresis? Simply that the hyperglycemia (usually >300) causes the body to excrete lots and lots of water, because the osmotic pull of all the glucose particles prevents the reabsorbtion of water in the collecting duct. This means that patients with DKA are peeing their brains out!! They pee out sodium, potassium, and water.. And are therefore, very very very DEHYDRATED, sodium depleted, and potassium depleted.
    Now for the metabolism end of things... The body cells are forced to metabolize fat for energy rather than glucose. How do they accomplish this? - beta-oxidation of fatty acids. This results in excess production of ketone bodies which deplete available acid buffers. This causes a significant metabolic acidosis, with a high anion gap due to the presence of ketoacids. The acidosis causes potassium to shift from the intracellular space to the extracellular space. This may result in a normal or high serum potassium level. This normal or high potassium level masks what is typically significant potassium depletion because the person was peeing all their potassium out as a result of the uncontrolled hyperglycemia.
    So what are we going to do now? I will give a very brief answer for now, expect people to ask questions in the meantime, and then provide a more thorough approach to treatment in the coming days.
    1)Give the patient tons of normal saline. Why? - because your patient is dehydrated as all hell. They have been peeing out every last drop of water because of their severe uncontrolled hyperglycemia. These patients require liters of fluid to replenish all the fluid they've lost as a result of the osmotic diuresis.
    2)Give them insulin. Why? - NOT because it will lower the blood glucose level, but because it will cause a shift away from fat metabolism and toward glucose metabolism. This will slow the production of ketone bodies which are precipitating the metabolic acidosis. Thus, I will repeat, we give insulin to shift away from fat metabolism and stop the production of ketone bodies.
    3)Give the patient potassium. Why? - As we discussed earlier, the person has been peeing out all of their potassium stores and are overall very potassium depleted, despite having normal or high serum potassium levels to begin with. In addition to being potassium depleted, the insulin you are giving will cause a shift of potassium from the extracellular space to the intracellular space, which will drop the serum potassium. Thus, we give DKA patients potassium way before they become hypokalemic.
    4)Give the patient dextrose. Why? - They insulin you are giving the patient is obviously going to cause the serum glucose to decrease. We give glucose to prevent hypoglycemia as we continue to give insulin.
    How do we know when we are finished treating these patients? - When the anion gap returns to normal.
    That's all for now. Please ask any questions you have. I will be giving more specifics about DKA management in the near future.
    PS: Does anyone know the dangerous consequence of giving DKA patients fluid too rapidly? What are the symptoms this may cause, and what is the pathophysiology behind these symptoms?

  2. -> Continue reading
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