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Partially Compensated Respiratory Acidosis Example

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Arterial blood gas: ABGs made easy for nurses, nursing school students with the Tic Tac Toe Method for NCLEX exam This video demonstrates how to set-up arterial blood gas problems for solving respiratory acidosis/alkalosis and metabolic acidosis/alkalosis (fully compensated or partially compensated. ABG Quiz: http://www.registerednursern.com/abg-... Video: How to use the Tic Tac Toe Method for PARTIALLY vs FULLY Compensated ABGs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_V8E... Respiratory Acidosis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0Vjn... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

The Abcs Of Abgs: Blood Gas Analysis

A systematic and step-wise process based upon pH shift is the key to correct interpretation and application of arterial blood gas results In a previous article, “The Pitfalls of Arterial Blood Gases” (RT, April 2013), I described how simple pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical errors can produce arterial blood gas test results (ABGs) that are of little or no value, and perhaps even dangerous. In this article, I will assume that we have avoided all of those pitfalls and and will discuss how to interpret valid ABG results. (Some of the foundational information in this article is necessary for those new to interpreting. I encourage more experienced practitioners to bear with me.) This article will not attempt to discuss all of the possible causes or disease states that could relate to the results. Neither will it attempt to go into the interpretation of electrolytes or co-oximetry results. Adequate review of these subjects could require—in fact, have required—whole textbooks, and are beyond the scope of this article. What Is Normal? To interpret ABGs, we first need to know the normal values for the various analytes. Where do these normal values come from? They mostl Continue reading >>

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  1. wannabemeso

    Keto vs Paleo/Primal diets. Who wins?

    Which is better? What's the difference? I've seen some of the before and afters, and they're honestly sometimes more dramatic than keto/LC ones i've seen (which is saying a lot).
    What's the biggest difference between the 2? Is it just keto minus diary and anything processed?
    Anyone here done both?

  2. Atavis

    The winner is the one who understands that both are tools. If you are looking for the next great thing go ahead and try it.

  3. devildogJMS

    Originally Posted by Atavis
    The winner is the one who understands that both are tools. If you are looking for the next great thing go ahead and try it.

    Agreed. Paleo diets are being marketed as this new revolutionary weight loss trend...its the oldest diet ever!(maybe) Both are fine as long as you do them correctly. After I shed most of my unwanted bodyfat away, Im going to be doing more of a Paleo lifestyle.

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This video helps the Spanish Medical Interpreter by expanding his/her Spanish Medical Terminology by demonstrating how to Pronounce Insulin in Spanish and adding a visual description of the word.

Abg Interpreter

pH CO2 HCO3 Result appears in here. Normal Arterial Blood Gas Values pH 7.35-7.45 PaCO2 35-45 mm Hg PaO2 80-95 mm Hg HCO3 22-26 mEq/L O2 Saturation 95-99% BE +/- 1 Four-Step Guide to ABG Analysis Is the pH normal, acidotic or alkalotic? Are the pCO2 or HCO3 abnormal? Which one appears to influence the pH? If both the pCO2 and HCO3 are abnormal, the one which deviates most from the norm is most likely causing an abnormal pH. Check the pO2. Is the patient hypoxic? I used Swearingen's handbook (1990) to base the results of this calculator. The book makes the distinction between acute and chronic disorders based on symptoms from identical ABGs. This calculator only differentiates between acute (pH abnormal) and compensated (pH normal). Compensation can be seen when both the PCO2 and HCO3 rise or fall together to maintain a normal pH. Part compensation occurs when the PCO2 and HCO3 rise or fall together but the pH remains abnormal. This indicates a compensatory mechanism attempted to restore a normal pH. I have not put exact limits into the calculator. For example, it will perceive respiratory acidosis as any pH < 7.35 and any CO2 > 45 (i.e. a pH of 1 and CO2 of 1000). These results do Continue reading >>

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  1. MrMaggs

    A better way to test blood ketones?

    Hi all,
    I hope you had a great weekend. I`m an entrepreneur based in Japan developing smart sensors for advanced ketone detection. I got involved in this area after one of my friends was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. I`d be very grateful to ask a few questions on checking ketones:
    1. Roughly how many times a week would you say you check your ketone levels, and how? (test strips/blood reader/breath analyzer)
    2. If you don`t check your *blood* ketones, why? Is it because urine strips are good enough, or because of the cost, or because you are already drawing blood for glucose checking and don't want to do this again for ketones?
    3. If there was a convenient way to test the same ketones as a blood reader (BHB) through your urine for significantly less cost, would that be of interest? Why/why not?
    Thank you so much!
    Daniel

  2. karena

    Hi Daniel, welcome to DD. Your friend is fortunate to have you looking at ways to make life easier. I just want to tell you that measuring ketones would be important when a T1 is sick or has DKA symptoms but it's not something we do all the time. So I put some answers in blue bold for your questions.

    Originally Posted by MrMaggs
    Hi all,
    I hope you had a great weekend. I`m an entrepreneur based in Japan developing smart sensors for advanced ketone detection. I got involved in this area after one of my friends was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. I`d be very grateful to ask a few questions on checking ketones:
    1. Roughly how many times a week would you say you check your ketone levels, and how? (test strips/blood reader/breath analyzer) 0
    2. If you don`t check your *blood* ketones, why? Is it because urine strips are good enough, or because of the cost, or because you are already drawing blood for glucose checking and don't want to do this again for ketones? If I need to check I just use urine strips because they are good enough and they are cheap. Please know that we don't really "draw blood" we do a tiny finger prick with a tiny lancet and it's a tiny drop.
    3. If there was a convenient way to test the same ketones as a blood reader (BHB) through your urine for significantly less cost, would that be of interest? Why/why not? This already exists in some BG meters.
    Thank you so much!
    Daniel

  3. Jollymon

    Didn't the OP do this post last year?
    In this thread ---> https://www.diabetesdaily.com/forum/...gs/#post829852

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10 arterial blood gas problems worked using the tic-tac-toe method.

8-step Guide To Abg Analysis: Tic-tac-toe Method

An arterial blood gas (ABG) is a blood test that measures the acidity (pH) and the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood . Blood for an ABG test is taken from an artery whereas most other blood tests are done on a sample of blood taken from a vein. This test is done to monitor several conditions that can cause serious health complications especially to critically ill individuals. Every day, a lot of nursing and medical students assigned in acute areas encounter ABG results, which they may not necessarily be able to interpret with its knotty aspect. They struggle over the interpretation of its measurements, but they are not especially complicated nor difficult if you understand the basic physiology and have a step by step process to analyze and interpret them. There may be various tips and strategies to guide you, from mnemonics, to charts, to lectures, to practice, but this article will tell you how to interpret ABGs in the easiest possible way. And once you have finished reading this, youll be doing actual ABG analysis in the NCLEX with fun and excitement! Here are the steps: Know the normal and abnormal ABG values when you review the lab reports. Theyre fairly easy to Continue reading >>

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  1. MathWiz

    I wasn’t sure which section I should post this in, my strategy is what I call the 4–2–1 plan, I fast 2 day non consecutive days a week, eat a low carb but not calorie restricted diet 4 days a week to keep the fat burning benefits of ketosis going and then I give myself 1 day a week to indulge and eat whatever I want, usually a Saturday pasta dinner and wonderful dessert. I also walk 4 to 6 miles a day during the week and 10 to 12 miles on Saturday.
    Low Carb plans such as Atkins can be very effective for some people including me, many people who start a low carb diet experience get what’s called the “ketosis flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose.
    The basic symptoms are:
    – Headaches
    – Nausea
    – Upset stomach
    – Lack of mental clarity (brain fog)
    – Sleepiness
    – Fatigue
    It’s called the “ketosis flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately it only lasted 2 days but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was really high and consistent throughout the day!
    The first time I thought to myself: “What the heck am I doing? I feel like I’m going to die!” but I persevered and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I had gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it.
    For those of you that are going through the ketosis flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up refreshed for the first time in years, not getting the afternoon “blah” feeling and stuffing my face with carbs to try to boost my energy is the best side effect of the low carb diet I’ve experienced. Okay, losing weight while eating good food, feeling full and satisfied is great too.
    First you have to understand why your body is reacting this way. Your body’s been burning glucose for energy so it’s basically full of enzymes that are waiting to deal with the carbs you eat, but now the body needs to make new enzymes that burn fat for fuel instead of carbs, and the transition period causes the flu-like symptoms.
    There are some things you can do to lessen the symptoms of the ketosis flu and to make it go away sooner (to force the body to transition sooner) Ok, let’s get to the good part – what to do:
    First of all – you’re probably dehydrated. Drink PLENTY of water while you’re on a low carb diet, and then drink some more.
    Watch your electrolytes. When the body is getting rid of excess insulin from your former carb-crazy diet you´ll lose lots of fluids that have been retained in your body. This causes the rapid weight loss most people see in their first few days of ketosis, it’s mostly water, sorry. When you lose all the retained water you also lose electrolytes like sodium, magnesium and potassium. When you’re lacking them you´ll feel like crap so when you’re feeling really ill on the ketosis flu try things like chicken/beef broth and look for foods rich in these minerals. Take a multi-vitamin and a multi-mineral.
    Ok, here is where people throw the red flag – Eat more fat – Yup, I said MORE fat. Have some butter, just not on a roll, eat some bacon and eggs for breakfast, just skip the potatoes and toast. This will force your body to hurry up the transition. You´ll think this is crazy and think you´ll never get lose weight eating this way, but you will.
    Don’t eat too much protein – The body can transform protein into glucose so if you eat too much of it in the first days it will slow down the transition. Go for fatty meat and cheese if you can, add fat to protein shakes etc.
    Drink water, replenish electrolytes (sodium, magnesium, potassium) with food and supplements, drink broth, eat fat and not too much protein.
    I hope this helps, and have a great day
    Charles

  2. rockyromero

    @mathwiz
    ” Take a multi-vitamin and a multi-mineral.”
    I have been forgetting to take a multi-vitamin on fast days. Thanks for the reminder.
    “Eat more fat – Yup, I said MORE fat. ”
    I will have avocado more often.

  3. AussieJess

    Thanks for that info, very interesting

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