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Partially Compensated Respiratory Acidosis

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Using Abgs To Optimize Mechanical Ventilation

Using ABGs to optimize mechanical ventilation June 2013, Volume 43 Number 6 , p 46 - 52 This article has an associated Continuing Education component. AN ARTERIAL BLOOD GAS (ABG) analysis can tell you about the patient's oxygenation (via PaO2 and SaO2), acid-base balance, pulmonary function (through the PaCO2), and metabolic status. This article focuses on translating ABG information into clinical benefits, with three case studies that focus on using ABGs to manage mechanical ventilation. Endotracheal (ET) intubation and mechanical ventilation may be prescribed for patients who can't maintain adequate oxygenation or ventilation or who need airway protection. The goal of mechanical ventilation is to improve oxygenation and ventilation and to rest fatigued respiratory muscles. Mechanical ventilation is supportive therapy because it doesn't treat the causes of the illness and associated complications. However, ventilator support buys time for other therapeutic interventions to work and lets the body reestablish homeostasis. When using this lifesaving intervention, clinicians should take steps to avoid or minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), which will be discussed in detai Continue reading >>

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  1. Ralph

    yes you read right..
    HONEY
    the bad stuff with a lot of net carbs and sugars.
    but let's start at the beginning..
    i am with atkins for 1.5 years now and lost 17 kg in a year, just to try lifetime atkins and going a bit too far with the daily calories and gain 10kg again in a few months..
    i am without flour, sugar and starches for a longer time (about 4 years now) and lost 40 kg altogether, needed atkins for the rest of it though.
    i'm at 86 kg right now, started with 120 kg 4 years ago and was down to 78 kg.
    so the time had come to start over again, but this time not with phase 1 and 20 net carbs, because i couldn't stay with that anyway, i was always starved out, headaches, no voice when speaking to other people, no power, exhausted and tired all the time. so this time it's the new 40 carbs max (20-25g carbs from vegetables and stuff and 17g of carbs from honey).
    then i read about loosing weight with honey and how honey would burn fat.
    well i guess you get a big "that won't work with atkins because of the sugars! it will block the ketose!".. but wait..
    here's the plan that has been worked out in a lot of studies, there are books about it, i just ordered them and will read more about that and try it out longer.
    but so far it works very good for me.
    plan is simple: 1 Tablespoon (21g) of pure organic non-produced and cold fabricated honey just before sleeping.
    the fructose will be stored in your liver over night, and that's where the magic happens.
    burning fat needs glucose to work, in other words ketose only works with carbs. not sugary carbs, but carbs, in the end all carbs are converted to glucose anyway, and where does fat burning happen ? in your liver, where too much fructose also gets converted to fat!
    the trick is to stay low carb all day, up to 20g carbs (not net carbs) and fuel your fat burning liver with fructose just before going to bed so it has enough fuel to really burn a lot of fat through the night, when about 70 % of the fat burning takes place.
    the glucose in honey is low glycemic (index of 20 on the blood sugar and insuline) so you don't need to be frightened, it won't stop your ketose, 21g of honey is 6.3g of low glycemic glucose, 8.4g of fructose that gets stored in your liver and converted to glucose to fuel ketose over night and not converted to fat (you would need full glycogen tanks in your body, thats about 70g of fructose and 130g of glucose, but with atkins, they are emptied) and 2.1g of polysaccharides (low glycemic glucose).
    your body burns about 4g of glucose per hour minimum (even if you're on low carb, it will build 4g of glucose from protein then), so with a total of 16.8g sugar your body will have empty glucose tanks in the morning and will have burned about 7.5g-9g of fat per hour also. that's about 66g of fat per 8 hour sleep, 462g of fat in a week just by sleeping with a tblsp of honey.
    without honey the ketose will not work that well, you will still burn fat, but not that amount because ketose needs glucose, and your body will need to get it from somewhere. you can drink a protein drink before bed, but converting protein to glucose will take time and it will spread all over your body and not specifically in your liver where the fuel is needed for ketose. so you will have less power for ketose and burn less fat than with honey.
    i tried this for a week now and works really good. i lost 2kg (a good 4 lbs) in just 3 days (i know a lot of it is water at the start), but so far it does not interfere with atkins and the low carb function of your body. you won't loose your atkins advantage.
    i'll look how this goes on and will read the books written on this topic my Mike McInnes in the next weeks, but honey at night won't make you crave for carbs while you're sleeping and it doesn't anyway because it's low glycemic and doesn't raise your blood sugars with a tblsp (21g), at least it doesn't for me and it's known not to.
    just make sure you stay away from produced honey, that's just glucose fructose syrup, nothing more, stripped of all vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, hormones, enzymes, and the molecule structure that makes it low glycemic.
    just wanted to share this with you.
    maybe someone here already has experience with all organic honey and atkins ?
    [ed. note: Ralph (1506227) last edited this post 2 years, 4 months ago.]

  2. Ellen

    Honey is sugar...period
    If glucose is needed to burn fat, since all carbs are turned to glucose, it wouldn't matter whether it was honey or anything else...and the idea of low carb is that glycogen stores are used up forcing the body to turn to fat for fuel. Honey will replenish glycogen stores in the liver (and muscles if you have enough) and the body will turn to this first as a fuel source.
    It's unlikely to take you out of ketosis because you aren't having enough. One tbsp contains around 17g carbs. Added to 20g a day on Atkins takes you to mless than 40. Most people will stay in ketosis under 40.
    4lbs is not unusual in three days at the start, so basically what you are doing is staying below 40 carbs which will take you into ketosis, losing water at the beginning g which you do on Atkins anyway, But instead of spending your carbs on wholesome food which keeps you satisfied (which you ncoukdnt have been doing the first time round or you woukdnt have been hungry, - and the other symptoms you describe are classic salt depletion symptoms) you are choosing to spend half your daily carb intake on sugar.
    No, sorry, not convinced.
    [ed. note: Ellen (172174) last edited this post 2 years, 4 months ago.]

  3. James

    Hi Ralph welcome to the forum and congratulations on your huge weight loss.
    I have to say though that my experience on phase 1 with 20 g carbs a day has not been exhausting. I do eat about 450 g of greens and atkins freindly veg a day though . and put salt in food as well.
    the honey thing sounds interesting though . keep us posted . It would be nice to have a tablespoon of honey at night though , especially on some greek yohgurt with nuts.

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Abg's Flashcards | Quizlet

- pH = 7.35 - 7.45 (hydrogen ion concentration) - PaCO2 = 35 - 45 mmHg (partial pressure of CO2 in arterial - PaO2 = 80 -100 mmHg (partial pressure of O2 in arterial blood) - HCO3- = 22 to 26 mEq/L (bicarbonate concentration in plasma) - BE = +5 / -5 mEq/L or mmol/L (base excess) they are drawn from arterial blood usually from the radial artery What information does blood gas data provide? - info on our body's acid/base relationship Why is our body's acid/base relationship important? - This relationship is critical for homeostasis - Significant deviations from normal pH ranges are poorly tolerated and may be life threatening - Balance is achieved by Respiratory and Renal systems - The acceptable pH range of our blood is 7.35 - 7.45, which is lightly alkaline. the more H+ --> the lower the pH (acidic) the fewer H+ --> Higher pH (alkaline or base) What is the preferred ratio for Base to Acid? How does the body regulate the Acid/Base balance? By increasing or decreasing the acid base levels in the body by producing or limiting production of acids and base substances What type of acids does the body produce? Body produces basically 2 categories of acids. What are the buffers that the Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. IceyVeins

    What do you think is the fastest way to get back into ketosis?

    Ive heard many different things, such as fasting for a while (16 hours i think i hearrd?) after your last carb up meal then doing a warrior type diet layout first day back in? And how about when it comes to cardio to get back in, i heard low intensity? I know some of you very experienced can get back in in a few hours, it took me 2-3 days, i wanna get back in quicker this time. advice

  2. IceyVeins

    anyone o.0

  3. TonyBear

    Well, just try to get back into your low carb keto diet, and try to eat less than 30 grams of carbs, in order to reach a state of ketosis real fast. Did you just have a refeed and are trying to get back into keto? On the cardio i think that it could be low intensity

    Originally Posted by IceyVeins
    Ive heard many different things, such as fasting for a while (16 hours i think i hearrd?) after your last carb up meal then doing a warrior type diet layout first day back in? And how about when it comes to cardio to get back in, i heard low intensity? I know some of you very experienced can get back in in a few hours, it took me 2-3 days, i wanna get back in quicker this time. advice

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Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an abnormal clinical process that causes the arterial Pco2 to increase to greater than 40 mm Hg. Increased CO2 concentration in the blood may be secondary to increased CO2 production or decreased ventilation. Larry R. Engelking, in Textbook of Veterinary Physiological Chemistry (Third Edition) , 2015 Respiratory acidosis can arise from a break in any one of these links. For example, it can be caused from depression of the respiratory center through drugs or metabolic disease, or from limitations in chest wall expansion due to neuromuscular disorders or trauma (Table 90-1). It can also arise from pulmonary disease, card iog en ic pu lmon a ryedema, a spira tion of a foreign body or vomitus, pneumothorax and pleural space disease, or through mechanical hypoventilation. Unless there is a superimposed or secondary metabolic acidosis, the plasma anion gap will usually be normal in respiratory acidosis. Kamel S. Kamel MD, FRCPC, Mitchell L. Halperin MD, FRCPC, in Fluid, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Physiology (Fifth Edition) , 2017 Respiratory acidosis is characterized by an increased arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The major cause of respiratory acido Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. takecare0904

    Hi. As the title says, I'm losing my hair. I've been on keto (mostly lazy) since May and have lost 25lbs... but I've recently started losing my hair, too. Any ideas? Thanks!

  2. Amesicle

    Hair loss can be a symptom of hypothyroidism. Keto can mess with your thyroid function. Have a doctor check your thyroid levels. Insist on having T4, T3, TSH, and FT4 checked, not just TSH.
    Your FT4 must be in the upper half of "normal" range of values for you to feel OK and take away the symptoms (e.g. Hair loss).

  3. takecare0904

    Thanks. I'll check it out!

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