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Partially Compensated Metabolic Acidosis Causes

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Patil81, Chapter 2

Fig. 6. Comparison of hypotheses 1 & 2 at intermediate level This is a 40 year old 70.0 kg male patient. His electrolytes are: ... The patient has moderate metabolic acidosis, mild hypokalemia and moderate hypobicarbonatemia. The metabolic acidosis along with moderate hypocapnia causes hypobicarbonatemia. The hypobicarbonatemia along with hypocapnia causes mild acidemia. The acidemia partly compensates thesuspected moderate hypokalemia leading to the observed hypokalemia. The metabolic acidosis remains to be accounted for. The hypokalemia has only been partially accounted for. Hypothesis 2: Chronic Reap. Alkalosis & Acute Reap. Acidosis This is a 40 year old 70.0 kg male patient. His electrolytes are: ... The patient has moderate acute respiratory acidosis, moderate chronic respiratory alkalosis, mild hypokalemia and moderate hypobicarbonatemia. The chronic respiratory alkalosis and acute respiratory acidosis along with mild acidemia cause moderate hypocapnia, which causes hypobicarbonatemia. Thehypobicarbonatemia and hypocapnia cause acidemia. The acidemia partly compensates the suspectedmoderate hypokalemia leading to the observed hypokalemia. The acute respiratory acidosis and Continue reading >>

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  1. drofnor

    I am new to this, only one fast down and planned my fast day to the calorie. I experience fluctuating blood sugar levels when eating sugars (even fruit) so made sure on my fast day I had protein for breakfast (egg, with veg scrambled), lunch (turkey with low calorie veg), and dinner (tuna with more veg).
    When I woke the next day I had an awful taste in my mouth and seemed to be producing more saliver than usual. Even though I have had a normal eating day today, the taste is still there (7pm at night). I wondered if I had triggered an accidental state of ketosis in my body. I don’t want to experience this every fast – does anyone have any suggestions as to if this is what happened?

  2. TracyJ

    Yeah, it’s probably ketosis. It’s not a bad thing as it means your body’s munching fat but it is a nasty taste in the mouth. I get it off & on (been 5:2ing for well over a year now). It doesn’t seem to be noticable to other people but to avoid any embarrassing bad breath moments or having the taste in my mouth I tend to keep a supply of sugarfree very low cal mints/chewing gum at hand.
    You’ll get used to it anyway. It’s a small price to pay and as I say it doesn’t seem to affect other people (noone avoids me because of bad breath or anything) it’s just a comfort thing for yourself more than anything. Usually wears off after the first non-fastday, so if you do your 2 fastdays with only a day between them, you’ll find you spend half the week with no ketosis taste at all and possibly some ketosis during the other (fasting) half – no biggie.

  3. drofnor

    Thanks Traceyj,
    The mints is a good idea. I might take you up on that suggestion. I felt quite uncomfortable though with the taste, so on my second fast day today, I had half a piece of toast with breakfast to try and up the carbs just slightly.
    I was wondering how long it takes for people to start and see results?
    I don’t have a lot to lose, 5kg max, but I’ve been trying to lose these 5kg for two years, and have had success in losing a kg or two, but then put it on again quickly. If this can provide me with a method to get to where I want to be, and not yo yo, I would be so relieved.

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Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an abnormal clinical process that causes the arterial Pco2 to increase to greater than 40 mm Hg. Increased CO2 concentration in the blood may be secondary to increased CO2 production or decreased ventilation. Larry R. Engelking, in Textbook of Veterinary Physiological Chemistry (Third Edition) , 2015 Respiratory acidosis can arise from a break in any one of these links. For example, it can be caused from depression of the respiratory center through drugs or metabolic disease, or from limitations in chest wall expansion due to neuromuscular disorders or trauma (Table 90-1). It can also arise from pulmonary disease, card iog en ic pu lmon a ryedema, a spira tion of a foreign body or vomitus, pneumothorax and pleural space disease, or through mechanical hypoventilation. Unless there is a superimposed or secondary metabolic acidosis, the plasma anion gap will usually be normal in respiratory acidosis. Kamel S. Kamel MD, FRCPC, Mitchell L. Halperin MD, FRCPC, in Fluid, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Physiology (Fifth Edition) , 2017 Respiratory acidosis is characterized by an increased arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The major cause of respiratory acido Continue reading >>

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  1. aprimalmomma

    I have been doing Primal/Keto for the past 2 months...I feel amazing, excellent energy, sleep, skin, etc...weight is and always has been in normal range....would like to lose the last 5 vanity pounds, but not worrying too much about it...anyway, I've noticed that I'm losing a lot more hair on a daily basis and I am growing concerned. Anyone else notice this? I also noticed that my hair is growing a lot faster (need a haircut every 3-4 weeks instead of usual 8 weeks)...any ideas? Thyroid levels were checked about 4-6 months ago and everything was normal...otherwise I feel amazing but am concerned about my thining hair...
    I eat 1-2oz of liverwurst daily and 1 C of bone broth daily. All meat is GF, eggs pastured, veggies organic, etc. I get 8 hours of excellent sleep, low stress, walk 1-1.5 hours daily...calories 1200-1400/day 70-85% fat, 50-60g protein, <20 carbs...love the way I feel so don't want to not be ketogenic...any thoughts?
    42 yo female

  2. Graycat

    Sorry to hear. Some people have no hair shedding problems on keto, but many do. This is most likely due to not getting sufficient sugar in your diet, which is essential for thyroid health. Personally, I struggled with this same problem for a long time and even now over a year later my hair has not yet recovered 100%.
    I would suggest eating more fruit for starters.
    Also, my thyroid tests also came back "normal", whatever that is supposed to mean. My understanding is that doctors do not test the thyroid in enough detail and misdiagnosing or under-diagnosing is a very common occurrence.

  3. Waterlily

    42 is too young to have thinning hair.
    If it was me, I would add a little bit of carbs up until my hair would stop falling out.

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Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metab Continue reading >>

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  1. Signature_wehr

    Hoping for some clarification- my ped seemed concerned with me starting keto, I thought it was the usual not enough calorie- supply concern, but she said ketones are excreted in breast milk and that wasn't great for baby. Is this a thing? anyone have any words of wisdom?

  2. hopelesslyinsane

    Aren't breastfed babies already in ketosis?

  3. gogotittyshow

    Breast milk has a higher percentage of carbs than fat, so probably not. Not in the same way we are at least.

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