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Optimal Ketosis

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Jimmy Moore is an American blogger and author who is best known for his "Livin' La Vida Low-Carb" books and blog. He has appeared on television and radio programs promoting a high-fat, moderate protein, low carb diet plan. Moore also runs a popular weekly podcast that has run over 800 episodes featuring interviews with experts in diet, health, and fitness.

Jimmy Moore’s N=1 Experiments: Nutritional Ketosis Day 121-150

I’ve just wrapped up the fifth month in my current n=1 testing of the concept known as “nutritional ketosis” and the interest in this has not waned a bit. In fact, many of my readers have even decided to take the plunge for themselves and started testing their blood ketones to see where they stand, too. I think a lot of people are just as shocked as I was (with a .3 mmol/L reading the first time I tested) because they thought they were doing everything right on their high-fat, low-carb nutritional plan. But perhaps they’ve fallen prey to some of the most common low-carb mistakes that seek to sabotage your efforts at attaining the optimal weight and health you so desperately desire. I sure did and now I’m correcting those thanks to the information I’ve obtained from this handy dandy little ketone meter. It’s not cheap to test your blood ketones on a daily basis (or TWICE daily as I have been), but the data you obtain about yourself is so invaluable. Even if you only test your blood once or twice a week, you’ll know more about how well you are doing on your healthy low-carb lifestyle from ascertaining the level of beta-hydroxybutyrate in millimolars than most of your Continue reading >>

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  1. Emacfarland

    I'm confused about what defines being in nutritional ketosis based on blood levels. The Diet Doctor website says 1.5 is considered ketosis while I've heard on Keto Talk from Doc Nally that fit and active people can be in ketosis at levels of .3 or .4 and that higher levels don't necessarily mean better. So I'm not sure what the heck I'm aiming for! If I get readings below 1.5 am I doing something wrong? I am fit and active and Doc Nally has said this can make blood ketone level readings lower because an active persons body is using the ketones more efficiently. Should I be aiming for higher levels?

  2. BillJay

    It seems that the longer someone is keto-adapted, the more their body produces just the right amount of ketones and what we measure in the blood is only what's not actually being used, therefore it seems not only possible, but likely that people are in ketosis even with lower betahydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels - the ketone in the blood that these meters measure.
    This is somewhat frustrating for me since I'd like for there to be an objective measurement of being in ketosis, but that seems to be elusive.
    Therefore, a better indication is your level of carbs since it is HIGHLY unlikely that anything over 50 carbs is in ketosis and more likely that keeping carbs under 20 grams is a safe bet. Another indication is keeping protein at moderate levels which is 1.0 to 1.5 grams per kilogram of lean body weight.
    Once the macro-nutrients are in the proper range, I think that signs of keto-adapation are more poignant and below is a post from Mark Sisson on Dr. Mercola's site that explains many of the signs of being keto-adapted.

    What Does It Mean to Be Fat Adapted?
    543

  3. richard

    Dr Phinney invented the term so he gets to define it.
    In his book "The art and science of low carbohydrate living" he gives the range from 0.5 to 3.0 mmol/l
    But recently he mentioned that some of Dr Volek's very athletic subjects were clearly in ketosis at 0.2 mmol/l.
    My personal range is from 0.2 to 0.8 mmol/l, and I have been in ketosis for almost 3 years. Prof Tim Noakes is also normally in the same range 0.2-0.8.
    I suspect when we first start we aren't good at using them so we make too many and use too little so we end up with a lot left in our blood. After we become better adapted we end up in whatever physiological range our bodys feel best ensures our survival. And people who are trained and good fat burners may be able to get away with less because they can make it easily.
    When I fast for 3 days and then do 3 hours of exercise my ketones can go as high as 3.5. But I know people who regularly get up to 7.
    It's worth pointing out that Dr Nally has mentioned in his most recent podcast that he eats exogenous ketones 3 times a day. And he sells them.

    Personally I wouldn't be worried. I think you are doing fine.

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http://shop.lionheartherbs.com/ to get all the supplies mentioned in the Video. Go to http://www.lionheartherbs.com/home to sign up for a lot more free trainings like this. This training is taken from http://howtodoacompletedetox.com. In this video, Elwin Robinson talks about his Strategy for Hydration, Detoxification, Alkalizing, and Blood Sugar balancing...all between waking up and breakfast. Drink 1: Water, Sodium Bicarb and Zeofirce Drink 2: MSM and Vitamin C, food form Drink 3: fulvic, iodine,iodide, silica, lemon Drink 4: Chlorella, Barley Grass Juice Powder, Marine Phytoplankton, Cayenne, Lemon, Atlantic Sea Salt. All: Pure, fresh, local Spring Water

Alkalinity, Ph Balance & Designing The Optimal Keto-alkaline Diet

“Your blood becomes more acidic when you eat all that meat!” the interviewee said, and I almost pulled off the road in consternation. I was driving recently, listening to a well-known nutrition expert talk about an alkaline diet’s many benefits. I found myself nodding in agreement until she delved into murky – OK, completely inaccurate – science about an overly acidic diet wrecking your blood pH. Often well intended, confusion and outright misinformation surround pH-balanced diets. As a medical doctor who often prescribes keto-alkaline diets to patients, I want to dispel that confusion. Clearing up the confusion: What’s an alkaline state all about? To do that, we’ll need to flash back to high school biochemistry, where you’ll probably remember studying pH and acid versus base (alkalinity). If you can’t recall, or would rather not go back mentally, let me provide a brief refresher course. (I promise to be painless and brief.) An acronym for “power of hydrogen,” researchers measure the total hydrogen ion concentration in a solution using pH. You can measure any aqueous (water-containing) solution to determine its pH. The pH scale ranges from one to 14. Seven is Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sarahmony

    Hi all, I haven't been able to find this answer through the search function nor online, but I am wondering if achieving optimal ketosis (1.5 - 3.0mmol/L) will happen once I become Keto-adapted; or is it contingent only on my macro intake now?
    My blood ketone readings are never less than 0.5 but also haven't been more than 0.8. Even when I was on a several-day stretch of 15-20net carbs I was not seeing a higher reading.
    To get into ketosis (0.5), I typically can consume up to 40 carbs, but as my will power and determination have increased in the last two months, I am content at around ±25 and no more than 30. So from my logging, whether it is 20carbs or 40 carbs, I am still at 0.5.
    That being said, I am losing weight, kind of... (A lot at first, and lost some inches now but nothing during the past month), my workouts consist of soccer (1x/W), crossfit (5x/W), dance (2x/W), and heavy weight training (1x/W).
    But really, I am just curious how this "optimal ketosis" scale works, if it is systematic in becoming fat-adapted or something I should be striving to achieve (like 10 net carbs?) now.
    In case needed: 25/100/124 ~1616-1645kcal intake, usually. Around 29%BF

  2. DownhillYardSale

    Hi all, I haven't been able to find this answer through the search function nor online, but I am wondering if achieving optimal ketosis (1.5 - 3.0mmol/L) will happen once I become Keto-adapted; or is it contingent only on my macro intake now?
    "Optimal ketosis" is rather meaningless.
    Your ketone levels will vary based upon a LOT of factors, the most important of which being your ingestion of glucose or something that can be converted directly into it, raise your insulin and cause ketone production to cease and therefore drop the levels when you urinate them out.
    My blood ketone readings are never less than 0.5 but also haven't been more than 0.8. Even when I was on a several-day stretch of 15-20net carbs I was not seeing a higher reading.
    It doesn't matter. As a matter of fact having higher levels of ketones will cause an insulemic response which will increase your blood sugar so there comes a point where having too many ketones is counterproductive.
    But really, I am just curious how this "optimal ketosis" scale works, if it is systematic in becoming fat-adapted or something I should be striving to achieve (like 10 net carbs?) now.
    It's largely irrelevant. If you are over 0.5 mmol/L then there is no reason to push yourself any further. There are too many factors going into your ketone levels to try and optimize your levels, particularly when you have no idea what that even does to your body in the first place.

  3. sarahmony

    Thanks for clarifying this. I couldn't seem to find a satisfying answer online.

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FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d... Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O6rsdo The carb cycling diet is one of my favorite diets because it is one of the fastest way to burn fat while retaining as much muscle as possible. Most people don't know that carb cycling is actually a form of ketogenic dieting. The ketogenic diet is a diet that is lower in carbohydrates, which makes our body convert more dietary fat and body fat in to keytones in the liver. Which it then goes on to use for energy. Like I've said in many of my videos the human body prefers to use carbs as its primary source of energy. You're body won't produce too many keytones on a high carbohydrate diet, because your body won't need extra energy from fat due to the fact that its getting its energy from the more preferred carbohydrates. The only way for our body to use more fat for energy is by not having its preferred source there all the time. Eliminating carbs completely, however can have many drawbacks on our health and well being. Protein, carbs, and fats are all important and necessary for our body. So in comes the cyclical ketogenic diet aka carb cycling and also known originally as the a

Ketogenic Diet/optimal Ketogenic Living (okl)

Keto-Adapted, Ketogenic, OKL, Low Carb, Optimal Protein. Using MyFitnessPal macros to keep protein high (30+g/meal = up to 120g/day), fat moderate (approx. 80g/day), and carbs low (24g/day) to lose body fat and gain lean muscle. Can up the fat once I reach fat-loss goal. Only 3 meals/day, 4-5 hours apart. 30+g protein/meal is a MUST. 516 Pins321 Followers Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Emacfarland

    I'm confused about what defines being in nutritional ketosis based on blood levels. The Diet Doctor website says 1.5 is considered ketosis while I've heard on Keto Talk from Doc Nally that fit and active people can be in ketosis at levels of .3 or .4 and that higher levels don't necessarily mean better. So I'm not sure what the heck I'm aiming for! If I get readings below 1.5 am I doing something wrong? I am fit and active and Doc Nally has said this can make blood ketone level readings lower because an active persons body is using the ketones more efficiently. Should I be aiming for higher levels?

  2. BillJay

    It seems that the longer someone is keto-adapted, the more their body produces just the right amount of ketones and what we measure in the blood is only what's not actually being used, therefore it seems not only possible, but likely that people are in ketosis even with lower betahydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels - the ketone in the blood that these meters measure.
    This is somewhat frustrating for me since I'd like for there to be an objective measurement of being in ketosis, but that seems to be elusive.
    Therefore, a better indication is your level of carbs since it is HIGHLY unlikely that anything over 50 carbs is in ketosis and more likely that keeping carbs under 20 grams is a safe bet. Another indication is keeping protein at moderate levels which is 1.0 to 1.5 grams per kilogram of lean body weight.
    Once the macro-nutrients are in the proper range, I think that signs of keto-adapation are more poignant and below is a post from Mark Sisson on Dr. Mercola's site that explains many of the signs of being keto-adapted.

    What Does It Mean to Be Fat Adapted?
    543

  3. richard

    Dr Phinney invented the term so he gets to define it.
    In his book "The art and science of low carbohydrate living" he gives the range from 0.5 to 3.0 mmol/l
    But recently he mentioned that some of Dr Volek's very athletic subjects were clearly in ketosis at 0.2 mmol/l.
    My personal range is from 0.2 to 0.8 mmol/l, and I have been in ketosis for almost 3 years. Prof Tim Noakes is also normally in the same range 0.2-0.8.
    I suspect when we first start we aren't good at using them so we make too many and use too little so we end up with a lot left in our blood. After we become better adapted we end up in whatever physiological range our bodys feel best ensures our survival. And people who are trained and good fat burners may be able to get away with less because they can make it easily.
    When I fast for 3 days and then do 3 hours of exercise my ketones can go as high as 3.5. But I know people who regularly get up to 7.
    It's worth pointing out that Dr Nally has mentioned in his most recent podcast that he eats exogenous ketones 3 times a day. And he sells them.

    Personally I wouldn't be worried. I think you are doing fine.

  4. -> Continue reading
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