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Nutritional Ketosis

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Four New, Cutting-edge Ways To Easily Shift Your Body Into Fat-burning Mode & Ketosis.

Great article. You actually answered my question as to the ratio of the 3 BHB salts which is quite helpful for me. For me, I had Keto O/S and found it quite good – my favorite was the chocolate swirl. But it was and is very expensive. Only 15-20 servings and would break the bank. So I turned to KetoCaNa and I’ve tried two flavours. Both of them were so salty that I almost threw up every time. Like flavoured sea water. Also only 15 serving per bottle. Then I turned to Ketond which is okay – Tigers Blood and Caramel Macchiato. What I like about Ketond is that it has a full 30 servings and is very transparent with it’s ingredients. It’s also the same price as Keto OS but you get 30 servings. But still, not the best taste. So in the end, I ordered 1kg of pure BHB Magnesium from a supplier in China and I will be developing my own Ketone product with 30 servings as a lower price than all the competitors, and with more Magnesium, and Calcium in it than Sodium so that it tastes the best and actually helps with weight loss (which Magnesium is proven to do at the right amount). What the companies don’t tell you is that actually Sodium BHB is the cheapest, then Calcium BHB and then Magnesium BHB to source so I would be interested in knowing if what you wrote is actually true or just an excuse to make the product cheaper. Probably a mix of both. So I have 2 questions Ben: 1. If you had to split the 11.7g of BHB into Sodium, Ca, and Mg, what ratio would you do for the best health results and potential weight loss? The current products on the market are about an 80/12/8 split. I would think it should be the other way around. 2. When I develop my own product and sell it, would you be up for sampling it and reviewing it on your website here? What flavours do you like/would Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood With A Home Ketone Meter

How To Test Your Blood With A Home Ketone Meter

testing is used by people with diabetes and by people on a ketogenic diet. You can test your urine or your blood for ketones. But because urine testing is not as accurate, the American Diabetes Association recommends blood ketone testing with a ketone meter as the preferable method. If you have diabetes, you should discuss home blood ketone testing with your doctor to learn whether it is recommended in your case and when you should perform the testing. Ketone testing is particularly important during periods of illness. Blood Ketone Meters for Testing at Home You will need a blood ketone meter and a kit that include the lancet pen and ketone test strips. These meters also will read blood glucose test strips, and both will download their results to your computer. Other brands and models may be available, including: Precision Xtra: This meter from Abbott Diabetes Care can store up to 450 measurements and will display your blood glucose averages over different time periods. You need to enter a code to switch from glucose testing to ketone testing. Users seem happier with the Precision brand, and researchers find it to be the more accurate. The strips require 1.5 microliters of blood. It also features a backlit display. Nova Max Plus: This meter from Nova Biomedical is often provided free with the purchase of two boxes of test strips. You don't have to enter a code to switch it from blood glucose to ketone testing; it does that automatically when you insert a ketone test strip. If you are using it primarily for blood glucose, it will remind you to test for ketones if your blood sugar level is 250 mg/dL or higher. The test strips for the Nova Max are less expensive but also flimsier and give more error messages, requiring retesting. The strips require less blood than the Prec Continue reading >>

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Do you want to lose weight? Here’s number 16 of my 18 best tips. All of the published tips can be found on the How to Lose Weight page. Before we get started, here’s a short recap of the tips so far: The first and most crucial piece of advice was to choose a low-carb diet. The next were eating when hungry, eating real food, eating only when hungry, measuring progress wisely, being persistent, avoiding fruit, beer and artificial sweeteners, review your medications, stressing less and sleeping more, eating less dairy and nut products, stocking up on vitamins and minerals, using intermittent fasting and finally, exercising smart. This is number sixteen: 16. Get into optimal ketosis Warning: Not recommended for type 1 diabetics, see below. We’ve now arrived at tip number 16. If you’re still having trouble losing weight, despite following the 15 pieces of advice listed above, it might be a good idea to bring out the heavy artillery: optimal ketosis. Many people stalling at weight plateaus while on a low carb diet have found optimal ketosis helpful. It’s what can melt the fat off once again. So how does this work? A quick run-through: The first tip was to eat low carb. This is because a low-carb diet lowers your levels of the fat-storing hormone insulin, allowing your fat deposits to shrink and release their stored energy. This tends to cause you to want to consume less calories than you expend – without hunger – and lose weight. Several of the tips mentioned above are about fine-tuning your diet to better this effect. Video course Do you know exactly how to eat a low-carb and high fat diet (LCHF)? This is required for ketosis. If not the easiest way is watching this high quality 11-minute video course on how to eat LCHF, and the most important things to think a Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis, Treating Type 2 Diabetes And Morea Q&a With Dr. Stephen Phinney

Nutritional Ketosis, Treating Type 2 Diabetes And Morea Q&a With Dr. Stephen Phinney

Nutritional Ketosis, Treating Type 2 Diabetes and MoreA Q&A with Dr. Stephen Phinney Is type 2 diabetes reversible? Is intermittent fasting good for you or dangerous? Is nutritional ketosis possible for vegetarians? Virta co-founder and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Stephen Phinney answers these questions and a lot more in this Q&A. Thanks again to everyone who joined our recent Facebook Live session with Dr. Phinney and for submitting great questions. Well be doing it again soon, and well announce our next live event on Virtas Facebook page . In the mean time, Dr. Phinney took it upon himself to answer many of the questions that didnt get answered. If you dont see your question, it was probably answered live. Enjoy! Q: Interested in reversing type 2 diabetes is a ketogenic diet recommended?? Thx! Dr. Phinney: Insulin resistance is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes and manifests as carbohydrate intolerance. Like other food intolerances, the most logical and effective approach to managing carbohydrate intolerance is to restrict sugars and starches to within the individuals metabolic tolerance. A well-formulated ketogenic diet can not only prevent and slow down progression of type 2 diabetes, it can actually resolve all the signs and symptoms in many patients, in effect reversing the disease as long as the carbohydrate restriction is maintained. Q: Appreciated your article on the concerns about prolonged fasting. Could you comment on the utility and safety of shorter durations of fasting (i.e. 16 hrs of fasting/8 hrs of eating or 20 hrs of fasting/4 hrs of eating over a period of 1 day)? Dr. Phinney: I do not have major concerns with either time-restricted feeding or intermittent fasting for durations less than 24 hrs as long as: There are adequate protein and vegetable intake Continue reading >>

Pleiotropic Effects Of Nutritional Ketosis: Conceptual Framework For Keto-adaptation As A Breast Cancer Therapy

Pleiotropic Effects Of Nutritional Ketosis: Conceptual Framework For Keto-adaptation As A Breast Cancer Therapy

Pleiotropic effects of nutritional ketosis: Conceptual framework for keto-adaptation as a breast cancer therapy Get rights and content There currently exists a lack of consensus regarding optimal nutrition strategies for cancer survivors underscoring the need for well-controlled dietary intervention studies investigating promising approaches. Several days of dietary carbohydrate restriction to levels < 4050g/day, with moderate protein, results in increased circulating beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) by an order of magnitude. When maintained for several consecutive weeks, the metabolic state of nutritional ketosis awakens a dormant set of genes and metabolic programs that counteract insulin resistance and manifest in several positive health outcomes. This process, referred to as keto-adaptation, is characterized by accelerated rates of whole body fatty acid oxidation, while glycolysis, insulin concentrations, insulin receptor activation and signaling, constitutive inflammation and oxidative stress are all decreased. Interest in nutritional ketosis as a therapeutic approach in various cancer models, as well as many other disease states, is burgeoning. In humans, the majority of ketosis-related cancer work has focused on head/neck cancers and glioblastoma multiforme due to the elevated Warburg Effect demonstrated. Although breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, some of the most common tumorigenic and metastatic pathways frequently exhibited are targeted by keto-adaptation. Many of the phenotypic outcomes associated with keto-adaptation relate directly or indirectly to breast cancer pathologies and comorbidities. In this review we discuss the rationale for nutritional ketosis as a pleiotropic treatment modality relevant to breast cancer, and the potential for keto-adaptatio Continue reading >>

Basics Of Nutritional Ketosis

Basics Of Nutritional Ketosis

If carbohydrates are available, your body will burn that first. If carbs are not available, your body will burn fat & your fat stores! “Keto” (scientifically known as “Nutritional Ketosis” but usually referred to as just “keto” or a “ketogenic diet”) involves restricting your diet to moderate protein, very low carbohydrates and high fat. It’s similar to the the Atkins diet, but with more solid science. When you are consuming enough protein to keep muscles happy, restricting carbohydrates as low as possible and making up the rest of your calories in fat, your body switches into a fat burning mode. Your liver will begin converting fats into energy molecules known technically as “ketone bodies” – which is where the name of the diet comes from. People end up with MORE energy and vitality on a ketogenic diet. Muscle cells are finally gaining energy instead of all the fuel getting stored away in fat cells because of insulin, specifically insulin resistance. The details of Keto can get difficult but the basics are easy: Get most of your calories from fat & moderate protein, things like: sausage, bacon, fatty steak, ground beef/pork, cheese, eggs, salmon, avocado, chicken (with the skin), olive oil, butter, coconut oil, more sausage, and bacon. You get vitamins and minerals from low glycemic vegetables (no carrots or potatoes, look for green veggies). Avoid carbohydrates as much as possible. You’ll need to stay below 20 or 30g a day. Get used to looking at food labels! Get enough electrolytes. Keto depletes your sodium, potassium, and other electrolytes. If you do not have enough electrolytes in your system, you’ll experience “keto flu” and feel miserable. It’s an easy fix: drink some 0 carb broth or eat salty foods. After 2-3 days, you’ll be Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis On A Ketogenic Diet

Measuring Ketosis On A Ketogenic Diet

Tweet Ketosis is the process of burning body fat for energy and can be measured when following a low-carb ketogenic diet. You don’t have to test for ketones for a ketogenic diet to work but some people may find it helps to check they’re on track and to tailor their diet towards more effective weight loss. Whilst ketosis is a natural process in the body, it’s important to know the safety implications of being on a ketogenic diet which will apply to people on certain diabetes and blood pressure medications. How measuring ketosis can help Whilst we can all measure our weight to see whether weight loss is occurring, there are a number of reasons why measuring ketosis can be better. Our weight can go up and down through the day but this won’t tell us whether we are actually burning body fat. Simply going to the toilet, for example, will involve a certain loss of body weight but that won’t give us any idea whether we’ve burned any body fat over the past hour or two. Additionally, if you’re exercising and putting on muscle, the scales will only show weight loss stalling or a gain in weight and won’t show you whether you’re gaining muscle whilst also losing body fat. Measuring ketone levels can help much more directly therefore as the production of ketones is a direct result of fat burning. Just as blood sugar levels vary through the day, depending on what we’ve eaten and how our body is coping with metabolising the food, ketones levels can also change through the day in response to the food we eat and how our body copes in response. How to measure ketones There are a few different methods of measuring ketones which each have their pros and cons. Urine ketone strips Urine testing strips are cheap but measuring ketones in the urine rather than the breath or b Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

A ketogenic diet is similar to a strict low-carbohydrate diet with two main differences: restriction of protein intake and the purposeful induction of nutritional (or physiologic) ketosis. (The low-carbohydrate diet was discussed in a previous article, and I encourage the reader to refer to What Is a Low Carb Diet? for more information.) Nutritional ketosis is a metabolic state that shifts the bodys main energy source from glucose to ketones. Ketones are derived from the metabolism of fatty acids. So, instead of utilizing carbohydrates for energy, the body burns fat. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with diabetic ketoacidosis. In nutritional ketosis, ketonemia reaches a maximum level of 7-8 mmol/L with no change in blood pH. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketonemia can exceed 20 mmol/L with a concomitant lowering of blood pH. Nutritional ketosis is a normal adaptation that can occur in the human body to sustain itself during periods of decreased food availability. In todays society, the majority of the U.S. population has an abundance of food, most of which is processed grains, starches, and sugars. This food abundance precludes the need for nutritional ketosis. A strict low-carbohydrate diet limits the amount of dietary carbohydrate intake to less than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. A ketogenic diet has the same carbohydrate restriction with the additional restriction of protein intake to 1-1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of ideal body weight per day. This limitation of protein intake is well above the Recommended Daily Allowance of 0.8 g/kg for adults, and therefore poses no threat for protein malnourishment or deficiency in otherwise healthy adults. Why the protein restriction? Excess amino acids, from the ingestion of protein beyond that which is needed Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis? Benefits, Side Effects & How To Get In Ketosis

What Is Ketosis? Benefits, Side Effects & How To Get In Ketosis

Odds are youve heard the word ketosis at some point. You likely know it has something to do with eating low amounts of carbohydrates. However, many people dont grasp what exactly ketosis means from a physiological standpoint, nor do they understand the vast benefits it can have. We will cover all the pertinent science of ketosis in this article. We will give you an overview of how to reap the benefits of ketosis in your daily life ! Ketosis is a natural metabolic process that your body uses to survive during times of food restriction (especially carbohydrate restriction). Technically, this type of ketosis is referred to as nutritional ketosis; people with type-1 diabetes may achieve ketosis by not using sufficient insulin. If ketones build to a critical point in the body in diabetics, a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis may result (which usually requires medical attention). Its crucial to understand that diabetic ketoacidosis is not the same as nutritional ketosis. The former can be a life-threatening condition if left uncontrolled as it makes the blood very acidic. Nutritional ketosis is safe and means having a healthy amount of ketones in the body, which imparts many benefits. Normally, your body thrives on glucose (sugar), which is why carbohydrates provide bursts of energy. In fact, this is why athletes, especially endurance runners, stock up on carbohydrates before sporting events. Moreover, the brain typically uses glucose to function. Its important to note that pretty much all the carbohydrates you consume (regardless of the food source), aside from a select few, are broken down to glucose in the body. The process of breaking down carbohydrates to produce ATP (the energetic currency of cells) is called glycolysis. However, when glucose isnt readily availabl Continue reading >>

Medical Vs Nutritional Ketosis : Keto

Medical Vs Nutritional Ketosis : Keto

2: Stay on topic. Off topic posts include: cheat posts, posts about other diets/others that are not eating keto, "farewell" posts, posts asking how to stop keto and resume a "normal" diet, etc. Off topic discussions will only be allowed in the Daily Community Support thread. 2.a: Why no cheat posts? In addition to being off-topic, cheat posts are specifically against the rules of this subreddit because they are negative, defeatist, and can serve as a trigger to those who are struggling. 3: Be respectful. Personal attacks, threats, and inappropriate/sexual comments will not be allowed. Please see the Community Guidelines for a more detailed explanation of what types of comments are in violation of this rule. 4: No low effort posts. Low effort posts are: title-only posts, posts with under 200 characters including those that contain only links to articles or images/memes, and posts asking questions that are explicitly answered in the FAQ. Save your memes for r/ketocirclejerk 5: No self-promotion. This includes posts linking to or containing: personal blogs/channels/websites/social media pages, affiliate/referral links, or surveys for market research or educational purposes. If you are posting progress pictures with a watermark we ask that the watermark contain your Reddit username only. 6: Do not ask r/keto for medical advice. Reddit is not a replacement for your doctor. Do not solicit or offer medical advice on this subreddit. Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis Explained

Nutritional Ketosis Explained

Really committing on the keto diet means not only choosing the right foods but also understanding what is happening to your body as you eat more fat. As you can tell from my chicken scratch above, I was a good student while learning about nutritional ketosis! Why do some people not gain weight regardless of their diet? These are all interesting questions that can be explained once you delve into nutrition science and metabolism. Lets start with a few facts that will help us understand our nutritional needs. 60% of the energy we expend is usedfor cellular activity to keep us alive 20% of the energy we expend is usedfor the brain The brain requires about 500 kcal glucose each day (100-120 grams) Your liver can store 100-120 grams of glucose Your muscles can store 300-350 grams of glucose Conveniently, your liver has enough capacity to store the glucose needed for your brain for about one day. Unfortunately, the glucose stored within your muscles cannot re-enter your blood stream and be used by the brain. It can only be used as energy for your muscles during physical exertion. Your body and brain arenormally fueled by glucose. Most of the fuel is used bynormal everyday processes, not physical activity. You can consider this your resting metabolism. Your body can only store about one days worth of glucose to keep you running. So what happens when there is no food to replenish these stores? When you stop eating food, your body will use up the stored glucose in your liver and your muscles. At this point, it needs another form of energy, and there are two options: protein and fat on your body. Protein can be converted to glucose through a process called gluconeogenesis, but as you can imagine, you would become weak as your muscles break down. And its why the length a person c Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis And Weight Loss

Nutritional Ketosis And Weight Loss

Nutritional ketosis induced by carbohydrate restriction is often associated with major weight loss, which raises some important questions. Dr. Steve Phinney and Dr. Jeff Volek venture into the complex inter-relationships between keto-adaptation, appetite, energy balance and weight loss. Nutritional ketosis induced by carbohydrate restriction is often associated with major weight loss, which raises some important questions. Do ketones cause weight loss? Do ketones promote a metabolic condition whereby fat melts away to a greater extent than a non-ketogenic diet of equal energy content? Alternatively, can a person maintain or even gain weight while in nutritional ketosis? To explore the answers to these questions, we need to venture into the complex inter-relationships between keto-adaptation , appetite, energy balance and weight loss. But before we do, we need to acknowledge that these questions have sparked an intense debate among serious scientists and the lay public over the last 15 years, and in the process sparking the expenditure of tens or millions of dollars on research in which both sides of the debate strove to prove the other side wrong. While we will discuss some of this research, much of it involving short-term studies done under artificially controlled conditions, we will also try to anchor this discussion with a perspective drawn from research utilizing well-formulated ketogenic diets for meaningful durations in the real world. In almost every human study of overweight patients lasting 3 months or longer comparing a ketogenic diet to a low fat diet in an outpatient (aka real world) setting, the weight loss with the low carb diet is somewhat or significantly greater (Sachner-Bernstein 2015). And despite claims by skeptics that most of that weight loss is w Continue reading >>

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