diabetestalk.net

Nejm Sglt2 Dka

Sglt2 Inhibitors Side Effects

Sglt2 Inhibitors Side Effects

Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are intended to treat Type 2 diabetes along with diet and exercise. They have also been prescribed for off-label, or unapproved, uses including weight loss. The active ingredients in the drugs are different gliflozin compounds. SGLT2 inhibitors approved for use in the U.S. include: In addition, some medications combine SGLT2 inhibitors with other diabetes drugs. These include: Metformin decreases glucose production in the liver while increasing the body’s ability to absorb glucose. It is often used in conjunction with insulin as well as SGLT2 inhibitors to treat Type 2 diabetes. It carries additional risks of side effects. Linagliptin works by regulating insulin levels after meals. When first approved, SGLT2 inhibitors took a revolutionary approach to controlling blood sugar in diabetic patients. The drugs cause the body to direct excess glucose to the kidneys. From there, it is expelled through a patient’s urine. SGLT2 Inhibitor Side Effects Range from Minor to Life-Threatening While the way SGLT2 drugs work is unique, this can also lead to unique side effects. For example, because the drugs cause excess sugar to escape the body in urine, it can also lead to yeast infections and urinary tract infections. The drugs primarily work in the kidneys, so these drugs are not for people with weak kidney function. Some studies also show these drugs may lead to dangerous kidney infections and kidney failure. Side effects can lead from simple annoyances such as dry mouth to more serious complications including kidney injuries. Common SGLT2 Inhibitor Side Effect Symptoms: Abdominal pain Back pain Constipation Dry mouth Fatigue Increased cholesterol Increased urination Influenza Male and female yeast infections Nausea Thirst Urin Continue reading >>

New England Journal Of Medicine Publishes Data From Phase 3 Intandem3 Study Of Sotagliflozin In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

New England Journal Of Medicine Publishes Data From Phase 3 Intandem3 Study Of Sotagliflozin In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

New England Journal of Medicine Publishes Data from Phase 3 inTandem3 Study of Sotagliflozin in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes InTandem3 Data Presented in Oral Symposium at EASD 2017 Statistically Significant Benefit Seen on Primary and All Secondary Measures Results Support a Novel Drug Profile as a Dual SGLT1 and SGLT2 Inhibitor Conference Call and Webcast Today at 8:00 am EDT / 7:00 am CDT The Woodlands, Texas, September 13, 2017 Lexicon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: LXRX) today announced that the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published the results of the Phase 3 inTandem3 study of sotagliflozin, an investigational dual SGLT1 and SGLT2 inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes on any background insulin therapy. The data were published online today in conjunction with presentation of these data at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 53rd annual meeting (September 11-15, Lisbon, Portugal) in a session titled, The Phase 3 inTandem clinical program: efficacy and safety of sotagliflozin in adults with type 1 diabetes. The study met its primary endpoint with statistical significance, demonstrating the superiority of sotagliflozin 400 mg compared to placebo in the proportion of patients with A1C <7.0% at Week 24 and no episode of severe hypoglycemia and no episode of DKA after randomization. The responder rate for patients on sotagliflozin was approximately twice the rate as compared to placebo. The difference compared to placebo for patients treated with sotagliflozin was 13.4% (p<0.001). The clinically meaningful and statistically significant effects of sotagliflozin on glucose control (A1C) were achieved with a similar rate of severe hypoglycemia while reducing weight and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with typ Continue reading >>

Adverse Effects Of Canagliflozin, An Sglt2 Inhibitor

Adverse Effects Of Canagliflozin, An Sglt2 Inhibitor

Adverse Effects of Canagliflozin, an SGLT2 Inhibitor Allan S. Brett, MD reviewing Peters AL et al. Diabetes Care 2015 Sep . The FDA has expressed concern about diabetic ketoacidosis and fractures in users of sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. The sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors (canagliflozin [Invokana], empagliflozin [Jardiance], and dapagliflozin [Farxiga]) increase urinary excretion of glucose. These drugs are approved for use in type 2 diabetes, but anecdotal reports suggest that off-label prescribing to type 1 diabetic patients is increasing. In May 2015, the FDA noted a possible association between SGLT2 inhibitors and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) . Now, several endocrinologists describe 13 cases of euglycemic DKA in 9 diabetic patients (7 patients with type 1, and 2 patients with type 2) who were taking canagliflozin in addition to insulin. The designation euglycemic DKA refers to presentations with anion-gap acidosis and ketosis but serum glucose levels only in the 100 to 200 mg/dL range. The absence of substantial hyperglycemia tended to delay recognition and treatment. Some of the cases were preceded by moderate alcohol intake or low intake of food and insulin. Presumably, in patients who are developing DKA for varying reasons, the glycosuric effect of canagliflozin lowers serum glucose and signals patients to reduce not increase their insulin doses. This sequence facilitates progression to full-blown DKA. The FDA also recently strengthened a previous warning about canagliflozin's association with excess risk for fractures in clinical trials . A proposed mechanism is a decrease in serum parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels in some patients who take SGLT2 inhibitors ( Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2015 3:8 ). The SGLT2 inh Continue reading >>

Jardiance, Invokana, And Farxiga Double Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Jardiance, Invokana, And Farxiga Double Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The June 8, 2017 edition of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has a “To the Editor” letter, titled “Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis after Initiation of an SGLT2 Inhibitor”, which is likely causing some concerns among doctors and type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. It is about the safety of Jardiance, Invokana, Farxiga, and other diabetes medicines in the SGLT2 inhibitor class of diabetes drugs. A June 7, 2017 MedPage Today article, “Study Warns of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With SGLT2 Inhibitors in T2D”, provides a summary and some commentary about the recent medical study which is described in this June 2017 NEJM letter to the editor: The newest class of drugs for treating type 2 diabetes carries a greater risk for diabetic ketoacidosis compared to other classes of drugs, a new study suggests. Newly initiated use of an SGLT2 inhibitor was associated with a roughly twofold greater risk of diabetic ketoacidosis versus new initiation of a DPP4 inhibitor (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.6), according to Michael Fralick, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and colleagues…. It is important to know that if diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is not treated, it can lead to severe illness or death. In more detail, possible complications of DKA include these medical conditions: Cerebral Edema (fluid buildup in the brain) Bowel Necrosis (death of bowel tissue due to low blood pressure) All of these newer diabetes medicines are part of the Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors class of drugs: Invokana (canagliflozin) Invokamet (canagliflozin and metformin) Invokamet XR (canagliflozin and metformin extended-release) Farxiga (dapagliflozin) Xigduo XR (dapagliflozin and metformin extended-release) Qtern (dapagliflozin and saxagliptin) Jardiance (empagliflozin) Glyxambi (e Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors Double The Risk For Diabetic Ketoacidosis. N Engl J Med

Sglt2 Inhibitors Double The Risk For Diabetic Ketoacidosis. N Engl J Med

SGLT2 Inhibitors Double the Risk for Diabetic Ketoacidosis. N Engl J Med The risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among type 2 diabetes patients initiating a sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor medication is about double that seen among patients starting a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, but the overall risk is still low, new research suggests. Findings from the largest study conducted to date to investigate the issue werepublishedas a research letter in the June 8 issue of theNew England Journal of Medicineby Michael Fralick, MD, and colleagues at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. "We found a doubling in the risk of DKA, which sounds frightening, but the absolute risk is quite small....I still think this is a very good class of medications and for certain patients will continue to be. Now we just have a little more information to add to the discussion when the risks and benefits are being considered," Dr Fralick toldMedscape Medical News. He estimates that between 5 and 8 patients per 1000 initiating SGLT2 inhibitors will develop DKA. And he advisesthat patients be monitored for signs of DKA or full information to thew patients of the symtoms of DKA to seek help if DKA appears after starting on SGLT2 inhibitors, noting, "This is something that can happen relatively quickly, so that's why I think it's important right after patients are started on these drugs that they're closely monitored and the clinician considers ordering bloodwork." But overall, Dr Fralick, a general internist, supports use of the SGLT2 inhibitor class for selected patients with type 2 diabetes, given the recent results from theEmpagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients(EMPA-REG OUTCOME) study showing Continue reading >>

Study Mentions Concerns Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis When Starting Sglt2 Inhibitors

Study Mentions Concerns Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis When Starting Sglt2 Inhibitors

Study Mentions Concerns of Diabetic Ketoacidosis When Starting SGLT2 Inhibitors Prior data had indicated that sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors could be linked to diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious complication of diabetes. Prior data had indicated that sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors could be linked to diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious complication of diabetes. The recently published results of a claims analysis seem to confirm the association between initiating SGLT2 inhibitor therapy and experiencing diabetic ketoacidosis. According to a study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the FDA issued a warning to patients in May 2015 after case studies showed patients were at higher risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. More recently, a report published in Diabetes Care indicated that rates of diabetic ketoacidosis, while rare, were elevated for patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis, which can be life-threatening, occurs when insulin levels are low, provoking the body to burn fatty acids, which causes the presence of acetic ketone bodies. Meanwhile, SGLT2 inhibitors decrease plasma glucose by blocking the reabsorption of glucose at the proximal tubule, the NEJM study explained. The researchers conducting that study used a large commercial claims database to collect a sample of adults who had initiated therapy with either an SGLT2 inhibitor or a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor, another medication for diabetes that has not been linked to diabetic ketoacidosis. They examined the records for evidence of hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis up to 180 days after initiating therapy. Over 50,000 patients were identified in the SGLT2 inhibitor group, who tended to be young Continue reading >>

Correspondence: Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis After Initiation Of An Sglt2 Inhibitor - Scoopnest.com

Correspondence: Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis After Initiation Of An Sglt2 Inhibitor - Scoopnest.com

correspondence: risk of diabetic ketoacidosis after initiation of an sglt2 inhibitor Correspondence: Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis after Initiation of an SGLT2 Inhibitor When @IvankaTrump & [email protected] their tax cuts roadtrip, I hope they can explain this [email protected] to me... US only advanced economy to increase dept-to-GDP ratio #fiscalmonitors #debtratio The U.K. just went 55 hours without using coal for the first time in history This is just brilliant - this map shows the biggest trading partner for each country 11 cross-party Select Committee Chairs, led by Yvette Cooper & Nicky Morgan join forces for a Commons next Thursday vote on the UK negotiating an effective customs union with EU for economy, Irish border... backed by 4 Conservative MPs already: JUST IN: Russia demands compensation at World Trade Organization for U.S. steel and aluminium tariffs, following similar move by China, India and EU - WTO filing In Myanmar the 90% Buddhist majority felt so threatened by a Muslim minority of barely 1% that it sanctioned murder, rape and enforced exile The late 19th century saw America suffering from similar problems to those of today. Rather than dying, liberalism reformed itself #OpenFuture At the heart of Donald Trump's system of power is his attitude to the truth: it is what he can get away with Takeda offers $60 billion for drugmaker Shire, Reuters reports A cinema opening is a tangible sign of change in Saudi Arabia, where Western-style entertainment has often been banned Scoopnest is a web media which finds for you the best tweets in real time! Get the top latest buzz on Twitter about everything you like : Breaking news, Sports, People, Fashion, Business, Entertainment, Health, Technology, Finance, etc... We sort and classify the best buzzing tweets Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis After Initiation Of An Sglt2 Inhibitor

Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis After Initiation Of An Sglt2 Inhibitor

To the Editor: Inhibitors of sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) decrease plasma glucose by blocking the reabsorption of glucose at the proximal tubule.1,2 Case reports have suggested that SGLT2 inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of diabetic ketoacidosis, which led to a warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in May 2015.3,4 The objective of our study was to assess the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis after the initiation of an SGLT2 inhibitor. Using a large claims database of commercially insured patients in the United States (Truven MarketScan), we identified a cohort of adult patients (≥18 years of age) who had newly started treatment with either an SGLT2 inhibitor or a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor between April 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014 (before the FDA warning). DPP4 inhibitors were chosen as the comparator medication because they are similarly used as a second-line treatment for diabetes but have no known association with diabetic ketoacidosis. We excluded patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, end-stage renal disease, cancer, type 1 diabetes, or past diabetic ketoacidosis. Our primary outcome was hospitalization for diabetic ketoacidosis (using the primary position code of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) within 180 days after the initiation of an SGLT2 inhibitor or a DPP4 inhibitor. We censored data for patients at the time that they discontinued the initial medication, had the outcome, lost insurance coverage, or died. We used 1:1 propensity-score matching to balance 46 characteristics of the patients and Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for diabetic ketoacidosis within 180 days after treatment initiation. Predefined sensitivity analy Continue reading >>

Jardiance, Invokana, Farxiga, And The Other Sglt2 Inhibitors Might Double The Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Drug Injury Watch

Jardiance, Invokana, Farxiga, And The Other Sglt2 Inhibitors Might Double The Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Drug Injury Watch

Jardiance, Invokana, Farxiga, And The Other SGLT2 Inhibitors Might Double The Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Study Compared Newly Initiated Use Of SGLT2 Inhibitor To New Initiation Of Another Class Of Diabetes Drugs To Assess The DKA Side Effect (Posted by Tom Lamb at DrugInjuryWatch.com ) All of these newer diabetes medicines are part of the Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors class of drugs: Invokamet XR (canagliflozin and metformin extended-release) Xigduo XR (dapagliflozin and metformin extended-release) Synjardy (empagliflozin and metformin hydrochloride) Synjardy XR (empagliflozin and metformin hydrochloride) The SGLT2 inhibitor class of diabetes drugs is approved by the FDA for treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). A "To the Editor" letter in the June 8, 2017 edition of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), titled " Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis after Initiation of an SGLT2 Inhibitor ",is likely causing some concerns among doctors and patients about the safety of Jardiance, Invokana, Farxiga, and the other SGLT2 inhibitors. From the start of that letter we get some introductory information about this drug-safety concern raised for these newer diabetes drugs: Inhibitors of sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) decrease plasma glucose by blocking the reabsorption of glucose at the proximal tubule. Case reports have suggested that SGLT2 inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of diabetic ketoacidosis, which led to a warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in May 2015. The objective of our study was to assess the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis after the initiation of an SGLT2 inhibitor. [footnotes omitted] A June 7, 2017 MedPage Today article, " Study Warns of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With SGLT2 Inhibitors in T2D ",provide Continue reading >>

Calling Home: Accuracy Of The Surprise Question, Medical Assistance In Dying, And Sglt2 Inhibitors & Dka - The Rounds Table (podcast)

Calling Home: Accuracy Of The Surprise Question, Medical Assistance In Dying, And Sglt2 Inhibitors & Dka - The Rounds Table (podcast)

Calling Home: Accuracy of The Surprise Question, Medical Assistance in Dying, and SGLT2 Inhibitors & DKA MP3 • Episode home • Series home • Public Feed Hmmm there seems to be a problem fetching this series right now.Last successful fetch was on May 01, 2018 22:15 ( What now?This series will be checked again in the next day. If you believe it should be working, please verify the publisher's feed link below is valid and includes actual episode links. You can contact support to request the feed be immediately fetched. ByKieran Quinn.Discovered by Player FM and our community copyright is owned by the publisher, not Player FM, and audio streamed directly from their servers. This week on The Rounds Table we are focusing on papers that highlight talent at home here in Toronto! Kieran hosts Dr. James Downar and Dr. Mike Fralick to discuss their recent publications, and Emily and Sheliza bring listeners the final special segment of the year. The surprise question Would I be surprised if this patient died within the next 12 months? is used as an intuitive means for physicians to try to identify patients they think might benefit from a palliative approach. James takes listeners through his recent meta-analysis examining the accuracy of the surprise question in practice for predicting mortality. Next, the final special segment of the year! Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) has received considerable attention in the past year as recent legislation in Canada surrounding it has changed. Emily and Sheliza bring listeners up to speed with an overview of the changes, a framework for implementation developed at the University Health Network in Toronto, and practical considerations for clinicians. Finally, a patient on a new diabetes medication comes into the Emergen Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors Double The Risk For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sglt2 Inhibitors Double The Risk For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

SGLT2 Inhibitors Double the Risk for Diabetic Ketoacidosis The risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among type 2 diabetes patients initiating a sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor medication is about double that seen among patients starting a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, but the overall risk is still low, new research suggests. Findings from the largest study conducted to date to investigate the issue were published as a research letter in the June 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine by Michael Fralick, MD, and colleagues at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. "We found a doubling in the risk of DKA, which sounds frightening, but the absolute risk is quite small.I still think this is a very good class of medications and for certain patients will continue to be. Now we just have a little more information to add to the discussion when the risks and benefits are being considered," Dr Fralick told Medscape Medical News. He estimates that between 5 and 8 patients per 1000 initiating SGLT2 inhibitors will develop DKA. And he advisesthat patients be strictly monitored for signs of DKA after starting on SGLT2 inhibitors, noting, "This is something that can happen relatively quickly, so that's why I think it's important right after patients are started on these drugs that they're closely monitored and the clinician considers ordering bloodwork." But overall, Dr Fralick, a general internist, supports use of the SGLT2 inhibitor class for selected patients with type 2 diabetes, given the recent results from the Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients (EMPA-REG OUTCOME) study showing reduction in cardiovascular deaths, as well as renal protection , with empagliflozin (Ja Continue reading >>

Effects Of Sotagliflozin Added To Insulin In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Effects Of Sotagliflozin Added To Insulin In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

In most patients with type 1 diabetes, adequate glycemic control is not achieved with insulin therapy alone. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of sotagliflozin, an oral inhibitor of sodium–glucose cotransporters 1 and 2, in combination with insulin treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes. In this phase 3, double-blind trial, which was conducted at 133 centers worldwide, we randomly assigned 1402 patients with type 1 diabetes who were receiving treatment with any insulin therapy (pump or injections) to receive sotagliflozin (400 mg per day) or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary end point was a glycated hemoglobin level lower than 7.0% at week 24, with no episodes of severe hypoglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis after randomization. Secondary end points included the change from baseline in glycated hemoglobin level, weight, systolic blood pressure, and mean daily bolus dose of insulin. A significantly larger proportion of patients in the sotagliflozin group than in the placebo group achieved the primary end point (200 of 699 patients [28.6%] vs. 107 of 703 [15.2%], P<0.001). The least-squares mean change from baseline was significantly greater in the sotagliflozin group than in the placebo group for glycated hemoglobin (difference, −0.46 percentage points), weight (−2.98 kg), systolic blood pressure (−3.5 mm Hg), and mean daily bolus dose of insulin (−2.8 units per day) (P≤0.002 for all comparisons). The rate of severe hypoglycemia was similar in the sotagliflozin group and the placebo group (3.0% [21 patients] and 2.4% [17], respectively). The rate of documented hypoglycemia with a blood glucose level of 55 mg per deciliter (3.1 mmol per liter) or below was significantly lower in the sotagliflozin group than in the placebo group. The rate of diabetic keto Continue reading >>

Canagliflozin-associated Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Canagliflozin-associated Diabetic Ketoacidosis

This article requires a subscription for full access. NEJM Journal Watch articles published within the last six months are available to subscribers only. Articles published more than 6 months ago are available to registered users. Continue reading >>

Empa-reg Outcome - Wiki Journal Club

Empa-reg Outcome - Wiki Journal Club

Among patients with T2DM at high risk for CV events, does daily empagliflozin 10 or 25 mg reduce CV mortality, nonfatal MI, or nonfatal strokes when compared to placebo? In this industry-sponsored trial, empagliflozin reduced the rate of CV events and slowed the progression of kidney disease among patients with T2DM and high CV risk. Excess mortality in T2DM is largely related to an increased incidence of CV disease. [1] In the 1998 UKPDS 34 study, metformin was associated with reduced all-cause mortality. The 2005 PROactive study not only failed to demonstrate a reduction in all-cause mortality with pioglitazone; the drug was associated with excess HF hospitalizations. [2] Subsequent studies of newer agents, including the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin ( TECOS , 2015 [3] ) and the GLP-1 inhibitor lixisenatide ( ELIXA , 2015 [4] ), have also been unable to demonstrate a significant improvement in cardiovascular outcomes among selected patients with T2DM. Empagliflozin is a glucose-lowering agent that inhibits the renal sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2 inhibitor) which confers several advantages including weight loss, reduction in blood pressure, and a low risk of hypoglycemia. [5] As the medication promotes glucosuria, it may lead to a greater incidence of GU infections and sepsis of urinary origin. Published in 2015, the multicenter Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcomes, and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes trial (EMPA-REG OUTCOME) randomized 7,020 patients to daily empagliflozin 10 or 25 mg or placebo. At 3.1 years of follow up, empagliflozin was associated with a reduction in CV mortality, nonfatal MI, or nonfatal stroke (10.5% vs. 12.1%; P=0.04; NNT 62), as well as a reduction in all-cause mortality (5.7% vs. 8.3%; P<0.001; NNT 38) and CV mortality (3.7% vs. 5.9%; Continue reading >>

Side Effects Blog: Jardiance, Invokana, And Farxiga Double Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Side Effects Blog: Jardiance, Invokana, And Farxiga Double Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Tom Lamb A lawyer helping people in drug injury lawsuits and asbestos-mesothelioma claims Side Effects Blog: Jardiance, Invokana, And Farxiga Double Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The June 8, 2017 edition ofThe New England Journal of Medicine(NEJM) has a To the Editor letter, titled Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis after Initiation of an SGLT2 Inhibitor, which is likely causing some concerns among doctors and type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. It is about the safety of Jardiance, Invokana, Farxiga, and other diabetes medicines in the SGLT2 inhibitor class of diabetes drugs. A June 7, 2017MedPage Todayarticle, Study Warns of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With SGLT2 Inhibitors in T2D, provides a summary and some commentary about the recent medical study which is described in this June 2017 NEJM letter to the editor: The newest class of drugs for treating type 2 diabetes carries a greater risk for diabetic ketoacidosis compared to other classes of drugs, a new study suggests. Newly initiated use of an SGLT2 inhibitor was associated with a roughly twofold greater risk of diabetic ketoacidosis versus new initiation of a DPP4 inhibitor (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.6), according to Michael Fralick, MD, of Brigham and Womens Hospital, and colleagues. It is important to know that if diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is not treated, it can lead to severe illness or death. In more detail, possible complications of DKA include these medical conditions: Cerebral Edema (fluid buildup in the brain) Bowel Necrosis (death of bowel tissue due to low blood pressure) All of these newer diabetes medicines are part of the Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors class of drugs: Continue reading >>

More in ketosis