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Morning Sickness Ketosis

Keto During Pregnancy

Keto During Pregnancy

I get a ton of emails a few months after these consults telling me that they are ecstatic and are now pregnant but are wondering on what to eat now. As if this diet of REAL food would be harmful to a fetus. There are many reasons why to not add in certain foods like gluten and dairy. Many times when cravings get the best of pregnant clients and they consume these foods, the auto-immune response can result in a miscarriage. But even if the clients are committed about staying away from gluten and dairy, they often worry that too low of carbs is bad for the fetus. You will never find evidence of this, but you will read it all over the web. The information that clients read have a few flaws: 1. A huge mistake is when people and doctors compare benign dietary ketosis to diabetic ketoacidosis. You can produce ketones in a starvation state. So instead of using a well-formulated low carb diet, they starved pregnant rats to get them into ketosis. The flaw in that evidence should be obvious. 2. The last form of this “evidence” is when they sliced up the brains of rat fetuses and saturated them in ketones. What happened was that the brain cells lived but it stopped producing new brain cells. This is thought to be evidence that ketosis causes retardation. Now let’s dive into the facts. The lean human body is 74% fat and 26% protein by calories. Fats are a structural part of every human cell and the preferred fuel source of the mitochondria, the energy-burning units of each cell. A fetus naturally uses ketones before and immediately after birth. Many studies done on pregnant pigs that are placed on ketogenic diets have fetuses with “increased fetal brain weight, cell size and protein content. In the early stages of pregnancy there is an upsurge in body fat accumulation, whic Continue reading >>

The Real Cause Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

The Real Cause Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

Preventing HG Podcast: Hyperemesis Gravidarum | Pregnancy | Morning Sickness | Nutrition | Root Causes | Alternative Treatmen © All Rights Reserved. 2014 Dr. Michael Fox is not the first person to suggest that the cause of morning sickness and hyperemesis gravidarum starts with blood sugar dysregulation but he is one of the few OB-GYN and Reproductive Endocrinologists who suggests that eating a ketogenic diet during pregnancy is not only safe for mom and baby but also the answer to this blood sugar dysregulation. Dr. Fox thinks that the problem starts with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), then gets worse when women eat carbohydrates (which turn into sugar in the blood) to combat the nausea (crackers anyone?), which can spike insulin 2-3 times what it would be in a non-pregnant woman, then add in dehydration, which makes everything worse, loss of nutrients (from vomiting and not eating) (especially magnesium, zinc and b vitamins) and so begins the cascade of symptoms that spirals out of control leaving the newly pregnant women feeling like she's dying with no hope of coming out of it. Add in doctors and nurses telling a women that it's "normal" and there is nothing that can be done and you have a very bad scene. In this episode we discuss: Ideal diet for Fertility, pregnancy, and beyond Fat provides the most sustained energy for the longest length of time Carbs= Sugar "Fat protects you against hypoglycemia better than any other macronutrient." Minimum time to be on diet to prepare for pregnancy, 6 weeks. 12 weeks would be ideal. Older cultures had special foods and preparations for fertile couples to have healthy babies. It's hard to convince women that they need to eat a lot of fat If ketosis was bad, we wouldn't be here. Not enough studies about nutritional ketosis and Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Is Probably Not For You

The Ketogenic Diet Is Probably Not For You

All the big claims are way ahead of the evidence. Michael Easter Oct 27 2017, 8:16pm Hex/Stocksy Low-fat was high fashion two decades ago. Cutting carbs and pounding protein was big in the 2000s. Now, fat is making a serious comeback: The ketogenic diet—comprised of 80 to 90 percent fat—the pitch goes, is the secret to everything from losing more weight to adding 10 years to your life, increasing your productivity, and purging your body of cancer cells. As of this writing, two of Amazon's top 10 nutrition books are ketogenic diet-focused. Google searches about the diet have grown nearly 20-fold over the last five years. Kim K, Lebron, Tim McGraw, and Gwyneth Paltrow have all gone keto. But just as other "don't eat this" or "eat more of that" diets of the past didn't cure all, so goes the ketogenic diet. "It's one of these diets where so many people are talking about losing tons of weight, improving their health risks, beating cancer, and all these other lofty claims," says Stephan Guyenet, an obesity researcher and author of The Hungry Brain. "But all those big claims are far ahead of the current scientific evidence." Advertisement Then there's this catch: Eating keto is a big, fat pain in the ass. Some background: The ketogenic diet "works" by altering how your body powers itself. By cutting carbs to nearly nothing, eating minimal protein and mostly fat, you shift from drawing energy primarily from glycogen—a sugar stored in your muscles and liver that you mainly draw from carbohydrates—to ketones, molecules your liver produces in the absence of glycogen. It takes about one to three days to enter this ketone-fueled state, called ketosis. Think of the process like converting your car's gas engine to a diesel engine. Your car and the experience of driving it is b Continue reading >>

Duchess's Rare Illness Could Mean She Is Expecting Twins: Doctors Reassure Wills And Kate That Condition Is Not Dangerous If Treated (and Could Mean Double Baby Joy)

Duchess's Rare Illness Could Mean She Is Expecting Twins: Doctors Reassure Wills And Kate That Condition Is Not Dangerous If Treated (and Could Mean Double Baby Joy)

Duchess of Cambridge 'dehydrated' after developing acute morning sickness She will be kept in hospital as a precautionary measure - royal sources Duchess likely to be between six and eight weeks pregnant Morning sickness can be triggered by enlarged placenta This could signal multiple births such as twins or triplets Medics reassure couple that treatment will keep mother and baby healthy Atomic Kitten star Jenny Frost, who is expecting twins, and TV presenter Kirstie Allsop suffer from same condition The acute morning sickness suffered by the Duchess of Cambridge causes nausea for up to five months of pregnancy or even until the birth - and it increases the chance of having twins. Known as hyperemesis gravidarum, it afflicts one pregnancy in 50 and is much more serious than the nausea commonly experienced by expectant mothers. The condition can lead to severe dehydration and puts both mother and baby at risk of being deprived of essential nutrients. Sufferers can be left vomiting up to 30 times a day, with exhausting and hazardous consequences. They cannot eat or drink without retching and may lose up to 10 per cent of their body weight, which can trigger a build-up of toxins in the blood or urine known as ketosis as the body tries to compensate for lack of food by mouth. Hospital treatment for these women is essential, as without intravenous feeding and fluids they are at risk of becoming dangerously dehydrated. Experts revealed last night that there is a ‘tiny excess’ of women who give birth to twins after enduring the condition. An enlarged placenta - which is a known risk factor for morning sickness - is more common in multiple pregnancies, such as twins or triplets, or during a molar pregnancy, where the fertilisation of the egg goes wrong and leads to an abnor Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis gravidarum is uncontrollable vomiting during pregnancy that results in dehydration, weight loss, and ketosis. Diagnosis is clinical and by measurement of urine ketones, serum electrolytes, and renal function. Treatment is with temporary suspension of oral intake and with IV fluids, antiemetics if needed, and vitamin and electrolyte repletion. Pregnancy frequently causes nausea and vomiting; the cause appears to be rapidly increasing levels of estrogens or the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG). Vomiting usually develops at about 5 wk gestation, peaks at about 9 wk, and disappears by about 16 or 18 wk. It usually occurs in the morning (as so-called morning sickness), although it can occur any time of day. Women with morning sickness continue to gain weight and do not become dehydrated. Hyperemesis gravidarum is probably an extreme form of normal nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. It can be distinguished because it causes the following: Hyperemesis gravidarum may cause mild, transient hyperthyroidism. Hyperemesis gravidarum that persists past 16 to 18 wk is uncommon but may seriously damage the liver, causing severe centrilobular necrosis or widespread fatty degeneration, and may cause Wernicke encephalopathy or esophageal rupture. Clinicians suspect hyperemesis gravidarum based on symptoms (eg, onset, duration, and frequency of vomiting; exacerbating and relieving factors; type and amount of emesis). Serial weight measurements can support the diagnosis. If hyperemesis gravidarum is suspected, urine ketones, thyroid-stimulating hormone, serum electrolytes, BUN, creatinine, AST, ALT, magnesium, phosphorus, and sometimes body weight are measured. Obstetric ultrasonography should be done to rule out hydatidiform mole and multifetal pregnan Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Practice Essentials Hyperemesis gravidarum is the most severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, characterized by persistent nausea and vomiting associated with ketosis and weight loss (>5% of prepregnancy weight). This condition may cause volume depletion, electrolytes and acid-base imbalances, nutritional deficiencies, and even death. Severe hyperemesis requiring hospital admission occurs in 0.3-2% of pregnancies. [1] Signs and symptoms The defining symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum are gastrointestinal in nature and include nausea and vomiting. Other common symptoms include ptyalism (excessive salivation), fatigue, weakness, and dizziness. Patients may also experience the following: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis Physical examination in women with suspected hyperemesis gravidarum is usually unremarkable. Findings may be more helpful if the patient has unusual complaints suggestive of other disorders (eg, bleeding, abdominal pain). Examination includes the following: Vital signs, including standing and lying blood pressure and pulse Volume status (eg, mucous membrane condition, skin turgor, neck veins, mental status) General appearance (eg, nutrition, weight) Laboratory tests Initial laboratory studies used in the evaluation of women with hyperemesis gravidarum should include the following: Imaging studies The following imaging studies may be used to assess women with hyperemesis gravidarum: Obstetric ultrasonography: Usually warranted to evaluate for multiple gestations or trophoblastic disease Upper abdominal ultrasonography: If clinically indicated, to evaluate the pancreas and/or biliary tree Abdominal computed tomography scanning or magnetic resonance imaging: If appendicitis is suspected as a cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnanc Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Duchess Of Cambridge's Morning Sickness Condition Explained

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Duchess Of Cambridge's Morning Sickness Condition Explained

Kensington Palace have announced the Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant with her third child, adding that she was unable to attend an event due to morning sickness. A Kensington Palace statement said: "Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to announce that the Duchess of Cambridge is expecting their third child. "The Queen and members of both families are delighted with the news. "As with her previous two pregnancies, the Duchess is suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum. "Her Royal Highness will no longer carry out her planned engagement at the Hornsey Road Children's Centre in London today. "The Duchess is being cared for at Kensington Palace." The Duchess, who is under 12 weeks pregnant, has suffered from Hyperemesis gravidarum - a very severe form of morning sickness - during both of her previous pregnancies. At a glance | Hyperemesis gravidarum Some pregnant women experience excessive nausea and vomiting. They might be sick many times a day and be unable to keep food or drink down, which can have a negative effect on their daily life. The condition, known as hyperemesis gravidarum, is more severe than morning sickness and often needs hospital treatment. Signs and symptoms Prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting – some women report being sick up to 50 times a day Dehydration – not having enough fluids in your body because you can't keep drinks down Ketosis – a serious condition that results in the build-up of acidic chemicals in the blood and urine Weight loss Low blood pressure when standing Unlike regular pregnancy sickness, HG may not get better by 14 weeks. It may not clear up completely until the baby is born, although some symptoms may improve at around 20 weeks. Treatment There are medications that can be used in pregna Continue reading >>

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Whether you just started following my blog or have been at it for years, you know I have a special interest in prenatal nutrition. That means I inevitably get a lot of questions about what I personally ate during pregnancy. Well, I’m spilling the beans today. Remember last year when I spoke at Paleo f(x)? My talk, The Carbohydrate & Pregnancy Controversy drew a bigger audience than I expected. And little did I know, Leanne of Healthful Pursuit and her assistant were in the audience taking notes. Leanne first reached out to me to set up an interview about ketogenic diets and pregnancy this summer, but alas, with a small baby, no childcare, and life being crazy pants, we got delayed. Like… 6 months delayed. But, you know what? Babies eventually get a little less clingy, eat things other than the milk your body produces (even if they’re still milk monsters), and lo and behold, childcare gets arranged and BAM, things-other-than-babying get done… sometimes. Imagine that?! It’s with great pleasure that I share with you my interview for The Keto Diet Podcast where we cover a whole host of questions about carbs and pregnancy, like whether a low carb or ketogenic diet are safe in pregnancy, how metabolism shifts during pregnancy (and what that means about carbohydrate needs), Qs and As about ketosis, and some important considerations about going low carb while breastfeeding. Listen here or on iTunes (The Keto Diet Podcast, Episode 21) Here are a few highlights from our interview: Is low carb right for everyone? How does low carb affect women with infertility or amenorrhea? Should women eat low carb if they’re having trouble getting pregnant? How do blood sugar levels affect infertility and rates of miscarriage? Are carbs required for pregnancy? Is it safe to stay low Continue reading >>

Natural Morning Sickness Remedies

Natural Morning Sickness Remedies

“Tried that, didn’t work” is a common phrase we hear about morning sickness remedies. Why is that, and are there evidence-based ways to ease pregnancy nausea? Those are the questions we’re going to dive into today. If you haven’t read it yet, earlier this week we talked about the causes of morning sickness, and how I managed to avoid it with pregnancy #2 and #3 using nutrition and supplements. In this post we’ll cover tips for easing nausea and food aversions while getting your baby the best nourishment possible. Before we jump in, though, please keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment – a full disclaimer can be found here. Okay, on to the post! Morning Sickness Remedies We’re all unique and some remedies may work better than others based on each mama’s situation, but one thing to consider before writing off a remedy is that most need some time to do their thing. According to Dr. Amy O’Donnell, who co-authored a study on several of the remedies we’ll be discussing (ginger, vitamin B6 and acupressure), “The evidence suggests that if these measures are going to be effective, they’ll start to help within three to four days.” (source) With that in mind, here are some suggestions for easing (or possibly preventing) nausea during pregnancy. #1- Magnesium Okay, I know just about everything seems to relate back to magnesium these days. Dog’s tail turned blue? Magnesium deficiency! Bus was late? Magnesium deficiency! But here’s the deal: Magnesium really does play a critical role in over 300 enzymatic reactions within the body, impacting everything from energy metabolism and stress management to hormone balance, detoxification, Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Kate Middleton's recent pregnancy put Hyperemesis gravidarum into the headlines. But what is this condition all about? Women expect to throw up during the first months of pregnancy; morning sickness is a rite of passage for many expecting mothers. But no one expects this typical pregnancy symptom to morph into a monster that can threaten the health—and sometimes the lives—of a mom and baby. Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is an extreme form of morning sickness, defined by the Hyperemesis Education and Research Foundation as “unrelenting, excessive pregnancy-related nausea and/or vomiting that prevents adequate intake of food and fluids.” You may have learned about the condition when it landed Kate Middleton in the hospital while she was pregnant with Prince George. She has since suffered from the illness twice more with her following two pregnancies. Affecting about one to three percent of women, HG can lead to weight loss, malnutrition and dehydration. In severe cases, it can lead to miscarriage and, rarely, it can be fatal. I had HG with my third pregnancy. I lost 15 pounds, broke the blood vessels in my eyes from vomiting so much and had to take three months of sick leave. I often spent the day on the bathroom floor, too weak to get up. “You know that sick feeling you have right before you throw up?” says Erin Rundquist, an Ottawa mother of three who lost 40 pounds in her first pregnancy due to HG. “Imagine that 24 hours a day for nine months. Throwing up 20 to 30 times was a good day.” Gideon Koren, a paediatrician, pharmacologist, and the director of the Motherisk program at Toronto’s Sick Kids Hospital, says that pregnant women who are throwing up or nauseated—especially those who can’t eat or drink—need to discuss treatment with their doctors Continue reading >>

What Is Hyperemesis Gravidarum (severe Morning Sickness)?

What Is Hyperemesis Gravidarum (severe Morning Sickness)?

Hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. (1) In fact, the words ‘hyperemesis’ (pronounced ‘hye-pur-em-ee-sis’) and ‘gravidarum’ (pronounced ‘gra-vid-ah-room’) literally translate to ‘excessive vomiting’ ‘during pregnancy’. (10) What are the symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum (HEG)? The main symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum are: continued and severe nausea and vomiting – particularly if vomiting occurs more than 3-4 times a day and prevents one from keeping down food or fluids weight loss – which may be over 10% of body weight nutritional deficiencies infrequent urination dehydration – which in turn may cause headaches, palpitations, confusion and hypotension (low blood pressure) when standing fainting feeling tired and dizzy ketosis caused by a raised number of poisonous acidic chemicals in the blood pale skin jaundice muscle wasting Ptyalism – excessive secretion of saliva (1-4, 13) How long does hyperemesis gravidarum last? Hyperemesis gravidarum can last much longer than normal morning sickness – which tends to settle down around 12-14 weeks of pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum generally diminishes around 21 weeks into the pregnancy, but it may continue much longer. (1, 2) What causes hyperemesis gravidarum? There are several theories regarding what causes hyperemesis gravidarum. Some theories concern the hormonal changes that occur in pregnancy. In particular, theories focus on the increase in human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This hormone is said to be associated with the peak in symptoms of morning sickness. There have been difficulties with directly demonstrating a link between hCG concentrations and severity of morning sickness however due to the variation in hCG concentrations in the popu Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #021: Pregnancy On Keto

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #021: Pregnancy On Keto

Interview with Lily Nichols, a real food-focused registered dietitian and diabetes educator, chatting about the ins and outs of balancing a ketogenic diet while pregnant. Strategies for amenorrhea and other fertility issues, when to go low-carb during pregnancy, breastfeeding tips, and more. For podcast transcript, scroll down. SHOW NOTES + LINKS Try ZenSweet mixes (international shipping) RSVP for my book tour Subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast app Watch free video series on managing gestational diabetes with real food Watch Leanne’s keto pregnancy video TIMESTAMPS Steps to accepting diet change (19:54) Pregnancy carb requirement (34:50) Fasting when you’re expecting (44:54) PARTNERS OF THE KETO DIET PODCAST Get the nourishment your body deserves and try Vital Proteins collagen protein, gelatin or liver capsules today. The podcast is partnered with Wolfe Clinic Royal Flora, my choice in soil-based probiotics. Get 20% off your soil-based probiotics with the coupon code GUT at checkout. 100% grass-fed & finished FERMENTED beef sticks with 1 billion naturally-occurring, gut-healing probiotics! Go to PaleoValley.com for 20% off. TRANSCRIPT FOR THIS EPISODE Leanne Vogel: You’re listening to episode number 21 of The Keto Diet Podcast. Hey I’m Leanne from Healthfulpursuit.com and this is The Keto Diet Podcast where we’re busting through the restrictive mentality of a traditional ketogenic diet to uncover the life you crave. What’s keto? Keto is a low-carb/high fat diet where we’re switching from a sugar-burning state to a becoming fat burning machines. If you’re in need of keto recipe food prep inspiration, I’ve prepped a free seven day keto meal plan exclusive for podcast listeners. The plan is complete with a shopping list and everything you need Continue reading >>

Severe Morning Sickness

Severe Morning Sickness

Severe morning sickness Morning sickness can often be first sign that you’re pregnant – and despite its name, can actually happen any time of day or night. Most mums-to-be experience morning sickness in their first trimester. It's not nice, but it is not harmful to mum (or baby), and it doesn't usually stop women going about their day-to-day business. Rarely though, it can become very severe and excessive, leaving mum not just nauseas, but totally unable to keep down any food or water and feeling completely wiped out and exhausted. This is known as Hyperemesis Gravidarum, and it often requires hospital treatment. What is Hyperemesis Gravidarum? If you develop Hyperemesis Gravidarum, you can end up dehydrated and suffering weight loss from the prolonged episodes of nausea and vomiting the condition causes. There is also the chance of your body going in to a state of ketosis, which is where raised levels of ketones are found in the blood and urine. Ketones are produced when your body starts breaking down fat, rather than glucose for energy, and as a result, causes even more weight loss. Doctors usually decide to hospitalise women suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum so they can rehydrate them intravenously, and dispense medication to treat the sickness. Although Hyperemesis Gravidarum is exhausting for any mum-to-be to experience, it is unlikely to harm the unborn baby, unless the woman loses a lot of weight from all the sickness – then, her baby could be born smaller than it should be for its dates. If you are being sick for prolonged periods, for example, several times a day for more than three days, and cannot keep down food or water, you should speak to your GP or midwife for advice. Support Women going through Hyperemesis Gravidarum, or struggling generally wi Continue reading >>

What Causes Morning Sickness?

What Causes Morning Sickness?

Ahhh, morning sickness. The quintessential pregnancy experience in which a woman heaves a whole plate of eggs into her own hair – ask me how I know. No other mammals seem to vomit during pregnancy, so what makes us so . . . uh . . . special? (source) While there’s no perfect answer to this question, today we’re going to dive in to the top theories about what causes morning – or more accurately anytime sickness – and in the next post we’ll discuss morning sickness remedies that may help. As always, please keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only and is based on the opinions of the author. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment – a full disclaimer can be found here. Okay, let’s jump in! What causes morning sickness? Morning sickness affects about 70-80% of all pregnant women. (Lee 2011) It’s probably caused by a combination of factors, including hormones, nutrient status, genetic factors and sometimes the presence of certain bacteria in the gut. Some researchers also believe it has a protective component – in other words, they believe morning sickness causes women to avoid foods that may be contaminated or spoiled. Understanding the possible causes may help mamas avoid or reduce the severity or duration of nausea during pregnancy. Let’s take a look at the top theories about what causes morning sickness and what the research says about them. Theory #1- Morning Sickness Is Protective This theory – which has been popularized by two Cornell biologists – “suggests that morning sickness and the aversion to potentially harmful foods is the body’s way of preserving wellness of the mother at a time when her immune system is naturally suppressed (to prevent rejection of th Continue reading >>

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