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Morning Sickness Ketosis

The Ketogenic Diet Is Probably Not For You

The Ketogenic Diet Is Probably Not For You

All the big claims are way ahead of the evidence. Michael Easter Oct 27 2017, 8:16pm Hex/Stocksy Low-fat was high fashion two decades ago. Cutting carbs and pounding protein was big in the 2000s. Now, fat is making a serious comeback: The ketogenic diet—comprised of 80 to 90 percent fat—the pitch goes, is the secret to everything from losing more weight to adding 10 years to your life, increasing your productivity, and purging your body of cancer cells. As of this writing, two of Amazon's top 10 nutrition books are ketogenic diet-focused. Google searches about the diet have grown nearly 20-fold over the last five years. Kim K, Lebron, Tim McGraw, and Gwyneth Paltrow have all gone keto. But just as other "don't eat this" or "eat more of that" diets of the past didn't cure all, so goes the ketogenic diet. "It's one of these diets where so many people are talking about losing tons of weight, improving their health risks, beating cancer, and all these other lofty claims," says Stephan Guyenet, an obesity researcher and author of The Hungry Brain. "But all those big claims are far ahead of the current scientific evidence." Advertisement Then there's this catch: Eating keto is a big, fat pain in the ass. Some background: The ketogenic diet "works" by altering how your body powers itself. By cutting carbs to nearly nothing, eating minimal protein and mostly fat, you shift from drawing energy primarily from glycogen—a sugar stored in your muscles and liver that you mainly draw from carbohydrates—to ketones, molecules your liver produces in the absence of glycogen. It takes about one to three days to enter this ketone-fueled state, called ketosis. Think of the process like converting your car's gas engine to a diesel engine. Your car and the experience of driving it is b Continue reading >>

43: Fat Digestion, Morning Sickness, Binge Eating, Carb Cravings, Steam Room Effect On Ketones

43: Fat Digestion, Morning Sickness, Binge Eating, Carb Cravings, Steam Room Effect On Ketones

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected]. And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam have another educational and entertaining show for you in Episode 43. **Special THANK YOU to Louann, Laura, Richard, Chris, Pedro, and Diane** KEY QUOTE: “Most women with significant morning sickness have a problem with B6 and B12. These vitamins are fat-soluble and need enough animal fat to absorb them well. If you take the huge prenatal pill with a large dose of folic acid, those can be nauseating by themselves. Eating keto helps prevent this.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 43: – Should I be concerned about the fat related digestion results of my stool analysis? Hi guys, I recently had a CDSA stool analysis to look for more information about my health. Under the absorption category, my fat related di Continue reading >>

Energy On Ketogenic Diet

Energy On Ketogenic Diet

A lot of people have been asking me about my energy on the Ketogenic Diet. Not only does the food I eat matter, but also the supplements I take. I believe our food doesn’t contain as much nutrition as it did 30, 50 years ago due to factory farming (soil degradation), genetic modifications, shipping from 1000’s miles away. We don’t get adequate amounts of nutrition from just our food. I believe we need to be consuming more superfoods and certain supplements. We have also forgotten about whole foods that provide us with so much goodness like raw milk, stews in cast iron pots and kefir made from bacteria and yeast. Pictured above are most of my daily/weekly supplements. Not pictured is a chromium supplement and stevia vanilla sweetner. On top of my high fat, very low carbohydrate diet, I depend on these products to fuel me. Inner-eco probiotic in coconut water is the best bang for your buck per serving. 1 tablespoon delivers 100 billion probiotics! Our immune system lives in our gut and it is of the utmost importance we take care of it. My next adventure is making my own coconut milk kefir! Check out the starters and recipe Next are Aloha products. WOW, I can not say enough great things about this company! Their customer service is brilliant and their products are delicious. Go now and use COLLEEN113 to get $20 off your first order. I’ve been putting the protein in coconut milk, chia seed, cinnamon and flaxseed pudding. Place everything in jars overnight. High nutrition, fast and easy. Crio Bru is a new product I purchased last night because I have a french press at the BBA studio. Instead of coffee, cocoa beans offer an energy and antioxidant alternative. IT. IS. SPECTACULAR!!! I tried it plain and also with a splash of creamer. It tastes of rich chocolate. I boug Continue reading >>

What Causes Morning Sickness?

What Causes Morning Sickness?

Ahhh, morning sickness. The quintessential pregnancy experience in which a woman heaves a whole plate of eggs into her own hair – ask me how I know. No other mammals seem to vomit during pregnancy, so what makes us so . . . uh . . . special? (source) While there’s no perfect answer to this question, today we’re going to dive in to the top theories about what causes morning – or more accurately anytime sickness – and in the next post we’ll discuss morning sickness remedies that may help. As always, please keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only and is based on the opinions of the author. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment – a full disclaimer can be found here. Okay, let’s jump in! What causes morning sickness? Morning sickness affects about 70-80% of all pregnant women. (Lee 2011) It’s probably caused by a combination of factors, including hormones, nutrient status, genetic factors and sometimes the presence of certain bacteria in the gut. Some researchers also believe it has a protective component – in other words, they believe morning sickness causes women to avoid foods that may be contaminated or spoiled. Understanding the possible causes may help mamas avoid or reduce the severity or duration of nausea during pregnancy. Let’s take a look at the top theories about what causes morning sickness and what the research says about them. Theory #1- Morning Sickness Is Protective This theory – which has been popularized by two Cornell biologists – “suggests that morning sickness and the aversion to potentially harmful foods is the body’s way of preserving wellness of the mother at a time when her immune system is naturally suppressed (to prevent rejection of th Continue reading >>

What Is Hyperemesis Gravidarum (severe Morning Sickness)?

What Is Hyperemesis Gravidarum (severe Morning Sickness)?

Hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. (1) In fact, the words ‘hyperemesis’ (pronounced ‘hye-pur-em-ee-sis’) and ‘gravidarum’ (pronounced ‘gra-vid-ah-room’) literally translate to ‘excessive vomiting’ ‘during pregnancy’. (10) What are the symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum (HEG)? The main symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum are: continued and severe nausea and vomiting – particularly if vomiting occurs more than 3-4 times a day and prevents one from keeping down food or fluids weight loss – which may be over 10% of body weight nutritional deficiencies infrequent urination dehydration – which in turn may cause headaches, palpitations, confusion and hypotension (low blood pressure) when standing fainting feeling tired and dizzy ketosis caused by a raised number of poisonous acidic chemicals in the blood pale skin jaundice muscle wasting Ptyalism – excessive secretion of saliva (1-4, 13) How long does hyperemesis gravidarum last? Hyperemesis gravidarum can last much longer than normal morning sickness – which tends to settle down around 12-14 weeks of pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum generally diminishes around 21 weeks into the pregnancy, but it may continue much longer. (1, 2) What causes hyperemesis gravidarum? There are several theories regarding what causes hyperemesis gravidarum. Some theories concern the hormonal changes that occur in pregnancy. In particular, theories focus on the increase in human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This hormone is said to be associated with the peak in symptoms of morning sickness. There have been difficulties with directly demonstrating a link between hCG concentrations and severity of morning sickness however due to the variation in hCG concentrations in the popu Continue reading >>

Morning Sickness: A Case For Protein

Morning Sickness: A Case For Protein

Image by Pregnancy and Baby Today’s Daily Tip: If you make a mistake and don’t meet your goal one day, don’t use “I’m off the wagon” as an excuse to stop. Get going again at the next opportunity and forget about the slip up! If you are in your first trimester of pregnancy, you might have already experienced a spell of morning sickness. Morning sickness is a common problem occurring in pregnancy with more than half of American women suffering from nausea, vomiting, or both during the first three months of pregnancy, according to the March of Dimes. However, the severity and occurrence vary not only from woman to woman, but also from pregnancy to pregnancy. Some women never even have the slightest bit of queasiness while some are so ill that they wonder how “morning” sickness can last an entire 24 hours. While nobody can pinpoint the exact cause, there are many theories for what is the culprit behind nausea and vomiting during early pregnancy. Reason #1 – Wrong prenatal vitamin You may be taking a low-grade prenatal vitamin that your body is trying to fight off and is having a hard time absorbing, thus causing nausea! Prenatal vitamins should contain 27mg of elemental iron such as ferrous fumarate, chelated, or gluconate. Brands such Rainbow Light, Shaklee, and Whole Foods brand are food-based and your body can absorb these vitamins. Avoid Iron-sulfate! Image by Alphamom Studies have proven that nausea during pregnancy may be nature’s way of protecting the developing baby from toxins and the mother from illness. I have personally seen some of the healthiest women I know have the worst cases of morning sickness, which leads me to believe that their body is very inclined to fighting off toxins. So in attempt to free your body of anything that could poten Continue reading >>

Severe Vomiting In Pregnancy

Severe Vomiting In Pregnancy

Sickness in pregnancy is common. Around 7 out of every 10 pregnant women experience nausea and/or vomiting, and this doesn't just occur in the morning. For most women, this improves or disappears completely by around week 14, although for some women it can last longer. Some pregnant women experience excessive nausea and vomiting. They might be sick many times a day and be unable to keep food or drink down, which can have a negative effect on their daily life. This excessive nausea and vomiting is known as hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), and often needs hospital treatment. Exactly how many pregnant women get HG is not known as some cases may go unreported, but it's thought to be around 1 in every 100. If you are being sick frequently and can't keep food down, tell your midwife or doctor, or contact the hospital as soon as possible. There is a risk you may become dehydrated, and your midwife or doctor can make sure you get the right treatment. Symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum HG is much worse than the normal nausea and vomiting of pregnancy ("morning sickness"). Signs and symptoms of HG include: prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting – some women report being sick up to 50 times a day dehydration – not having enough fluids in your body because you can't keep drinks down; if you're drinking less than 500ml a day, you need to seek help ketosis – a serious condition that results in the build-up of acidic chemicals in the blood and urine; ketones are produced when your body breaks down fat, rather than glucose, for energy weight loss Unlike regular pregnancy sickness, HG may not get better by 14 weeks. It may not clear up completely until the baby is born, although some symptoms may improve at around 20 weeks. See your GP or midwife if you have severe nausea and vomiti Continue reading >>

Severe Morning Sickness

Severe Morning Sickness

Severe morning sickness Morning sickness can often be first sign that you’re pregnant – and despite its name, can actually happen any time of day or night. Most mums-to-be experience morning sickness in their first trimester. It's not nice, but it is not harmful to mum (or baby), and it doesn't usually stop women going about their day-to-day business. Rarely though, it can become very severe and excessive, leaving mum not just nauseas, but totally unable to keep down any food or water and feeling completely wiped out and exhausted. This is known as Hyperemesis Gravidarum, and it often requires hospital treatment. What is Hyperemesis Gravidarum? If you develop Hyperemesis Gravidarum, you can end up dehydrated and suffering weight loss from the prolonged episodes of nausea and vomiting the condition causes. There is also the chance of your body going in to a state of ketosis, which is where raised levels of ketones are found in the blood and urine. Ketones are produced when your body starts breaking down fat, rather than glucose for energy, and as a result, causes even more weight loss. Doctors usually decide to hospitalise women suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum so they can rehydrate them intravenously, and dispense medication to treat the sickness. Although Hyperemesis Gravidarum is exhausting for any mum-to-be to experience, it is unlikely to harm the unborn baby, unless the woman loses a lot of weight from all the sickness – then, her baby could be born smaller than it should be for its dates. If you are being sick for prolonged periods, for example, several times a day for more than three days, and cannot keep down food or water, you should speak to your GP or midwife for advice. Support Women going through Hyperemesis Gravidarum, or struggling generally wi Continue reading >>

My Low Carb Twin Pregnancy Journey

My Low Carb Twin Pregnancy Journey

I realize this is much different than my regular food based posts, but none the less one that has raised many an inbox question. I just reached the halfway mark of my pregnancy with what we now believe to be two baby girls. We are so thrilled! We are expecting fraternal twins which means they are not identical. Basically two babies sharing the same birthday, but unique in every other way. We can’t wait to meet them! It was really funny and ever so slightly ironic that I had to test oodles of recipes for my recipe book in my first few weeks of pregnancy. YES! Nausea and new recipes… fun! But as they say, all is well that ends well. 1. WHY DID I CHOOSE TO CONTINUE WITH A LOW CARB LIFESTYLE DURING MY PREGNANCY? My family has been on a fully integrated low carb lifestyle for just over 18 months now. It is our new normal. It is our lifestyle. We cannot imagine feeling tired, emotional and hungry all the time anymore, so for me it made perfect sense to keep doing what is obviously working for my body. BUT the fact that I am also making decisions for someone else’s body… it made me ponder if I’m doing the right thing for them? I found confirmation after confirmation once I stopped reading pregnancy sites and shifted my research to what babies need for healthy growth. I devoted an entire chapter in my book to this. Basically, I looked at my entire nutritional regime and could not think of a time in my life that I actually ate a better amount of nutrients and less junk. I figured… our girls do not need junk like preservatives, colorants, enhancers, modified starches, hormone filled GMO Soy or GMO wheat. Sugar is void of any nutrients and really is the weakest form of energy so… not needed! I was shocked to see that most recommended pregnancy diets actually promoted Continue reading >>

Natural Morning Sickness Remedies

Natural Morning Sickness Remedies

“Tried that, didn’t work” is a common phrase we hear about morning sickness remedies. Why is that, and are there evidence-based ways to ease pregnancy nausea? Those are the questions we’re going to dive into today. If you haven’t read it yet, earlier this week we talked about the causes of morning sickness, and how I managed to avoid it with pregnancy #2 and #3 using nutrition and supplements. In this post we’ll cover tips for easing nausea and food aversions while getting your baby the best nourishment possible. Before we jump in, though, please keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment – a full disclaimer can be found here. Okay, on to the post! Morning Sickness Remedies We’re all unique and some remedies may work better than others based on each mama’s situation, but one thing to consider before writing off a remedy is that most need some time to do their thing. According to Dr. Amy O’Donnell, who co-authored a study on several of the remedies we’ll be discussing (ginger, vitamin B6 and acupressure), “The evidence suggests that if these measures are going to be effective, they’ll start to help within three to four days.” (source) With that in mind, here are some suggestions for easing (or possibly preventing) nausea during pregnancy. #1- Magnesium Okay, I know just about everything seems to relate back to magnesium these days. Dog’s tail turned blue? Magnesium deficiency! Bus was late? Magnesium deficiency! But here’s the deal: Magnesium really does play a critical role in over 300 enzymatic reactions within the body, impacting everything from energy metabolism and stress management to hormone balance, detoxification, Continue reading >>

Keto During Pregnancy

Keto During Pregnancy

I get a ton of emails a few months after these consults telling me that they are ecstatic and are now pregnant but are wondering on what to eat now. As if this diet of REAL food would be harmful to a fetus. There are many reasons why to not add in certain foods like gluten and dairy. Many times when cravings get the best of pregnant clients and they consume these foods, the auto-immune response can result in a miscarriage. But even if the clients are committed about staying away from gluten and dairy, they often worry that too low of carbs is bad for the fetus. You will never find evidence of this, but you will read it all over the web. The information that clients read have a few flaws: 1. A huge mistake is when people and doctors compare benign dietary ketosis to diabetic ketoacidosis. You can produce ketones in a starvation state. So instead of using a well-formulated low carb diet, they starved pregnant rats to get them into ketosis. The flaw in that evidence should be obvious. 2. The last form of this “evidence” is when they sliced up the brains of rat fetuses and saturated them in ketones. What happened was that the brain cells lived but it stopped producing new brain cells. This is thought to be evidence that ketosis causes retardation. Now let’s dive into the facts. The lean human body is 74% fat and 26% protein by calories. Fats are a structural part of every human cell and the preferred fuel source of the mitochondria, the energy-burning units of each cell. A fetus naturally uses ketones before and immediately after birth. Many studies done on pregnant pigs that are placed on ketogenic diets have fetuses with “increased fetal brain weight, cell size and protein content. In the early stages of pregnancy there is an upsurge in body fat accumulation, whic Continue reading >>

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Whether you just started following my blog or have been at it for years, you know I have a special interest in prenatal nutrition. That means I inevitably get a lot of questions about what I personally ate during pregnancy. Well, I’m spilling the beans today. Remember last year when I spoke at Paleo f(x)? My talk, The Carbohydrate & Pregnancy Controversy drew a bigger audience than I expected. And little did I know, Leanne of Healthful Pursuit and her assistant were in the audience taking notes. Leanne first reached out to me to set up an interview about ketogenic diets and pregnancy this summer, but alas, with a small baby, no childcare, and life being crazy pants, we got delayed. Like… 6 months delayed. But, you know what? Babies eventually get a little less clingy, eat things other than the milk your body produces (even if they’re still milk monsters), and lo and behold, childcare gets arranged and BAM, things-other-than-babying get done… sometimes. Imagine that?! It’s with great pleasure that I share with you my interview for The Keto Diet Podcast where we cover a whole host of questions about carbs and pregnancy, like whether a low carb or ketogenic diet are safe in pregnancy, how metabolism shifts during pregnancy (and what that means about carbohydrate needs), Qs and As about ketosis, and some important considerations about going low carb while breastfeeding. Listen here or on iTunes (The Keto Diet Podcast, Episode 21) Here are a few highlights from our interview: Is low carb right for everyone? How does low carb affect women with infertility or amenorrhea? Should women eat low carb if they’re having trouble getting pregnant? How do blood sugar levels affect infertility and rates of miscarriage? Are carbs required for pregnancy? Is it safe to stay low Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Kate Middleton's recent pregnancy put Hyperemesis gravidarum into the headlines. But what is this condition all about? Women expect to throw up during the first months of pregnancy; morning sickness is a rite of passage for many expecting mothers. But no one expects this typical pregnancy symptom to morph into a monster that can threaten the health—and sometimes the lives—of a mom and baby. Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is an extreme form of morning sickness, defined by the Hyperemesis Education and Research Foundation as “unrelenting, excessive pregnancy-related nausea and/or vomiting that prevents adequate intake of food and fluids.” You may have learned about the condition when it landed Kate Middleton in the hospital while she was pregnant with Prince George. She has since suffered from the illness twice more with her following two pregnancies. Affecting about one to three percent of women, HG can lead to weight loss, malnutrition and dehydration. In severe cases, it can lead to miscarriage and, rarely, it can be fatal. I had HG with my third pregnancy. I lost 15 pounds, broke the blood vessels in my eyes from vomiting so much and had to take three months of sick leave. I often spent the day on the bathroom floor, too weak to get up. “You know that sick feeling you have right before you throw up?” says Erin Rundquist, an Ottawa mother of three who lost 40 pounds in her first pregnancy due to HG. “Imagine that 24 hours a day for nine months. Throwing up 20 to 30 times was a good day.” Gideon Koren, a paediatrician, pharmacologist, and the director of the Motherisk program at Toronto’s Sick Kids Hospital, says that pregnant women who are throwing up or nauseated—especially those who can’t eat or drink—need to discuss treatment with their doctors Continue reading >>

About Sky News

About Sky News

The Duchess of Cambridge is once again suffering from a rare condition that causes severe morning sickness. This time the Duchess is being cared for at Kensington Palace, but she has previously been admitted to hospital for the condition. The severity of the vomiting caused by hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to dehydration, weight loss and a build-up of toxins in the blood or urine called ketosis. Hyperemesis gravidarum affects 3.5 per 1,000 pregnant women and can cause women to vomit blood. Sky News science correspondent Thomas Moore said: "The first step would be to get a woman on to a drip as soon as possible, get some fluid back into her bloodstream. "If that doesn't settle things, doctors can in fact stick a tube all the way through the stomach into the small intestines to make sure there is some nutrition getting into the mother. "There would also be the possibility of medication." :: Kate and William are expecting third child During the Duchess' first pregnancy, hyperemesis gravidarum sufferer Jennifer Burner told Sky News: "I think what makes it so difficult is that not many people understand it. What you are going through is deemed by many people as normal, they just think you are being sick quite a lot. "I was sick over 35 times a day, every day until the 35th week of my pregnancy, which means you lose weight. In my case I was put on drips to be rehydrated, put on steroids to keep my body warning. "I have never had normal morning sickness but I don't believe it is quite like that." Retired midwife Val Clarke told Sky News in 2012: "It often happens in very slim young ladies who - I don't know the reason why - become pregnant and the demands of the pregnancy are overwhelming to the point that vomiting becomes much more severe much earlier. "Poor Kate, it would Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Duchess Of Cambridge's Morning Sickness Condition Explained

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Duchess Of Cambridge's Morning Sickness Condition Explained

Kensington Palace have announced the Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant with her third child, adding that she was unable to attend an event due to morning sickness. A Kensington Palace statement said: "Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to announce that the Duchess of Cambridge is expecting their third child. "The Queen and members of both families are delighted with the news. "As with her previous two pregnancies, the Duchess is suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum. "Her Royal Highness will no longer carry out her planned engagement at the Hornsey Road Children's Centre in London today. "The Duchess is being cared for at Kensington Palace." The Duchess, who is under 12 weeks pregnant, has suffered from Hyperemesis gravidarum - a very severe form of morning sickness - during both of her previous pregnancies. At a glance | Hyperemesis gravidarum Some pregnant women experience excessive nausea and vomiting. They might be sick many times a day and be unable to keep food or drink down, which can have a negative effect on their daily life. The condition, known as hyperemesis gravidarum, is more severe than morning sickness and often needs hospital treatment. Signs and symptoms Prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting – some women report being sick up to 50 times a day Dehydration – not having enough fluids in your body because you can't keep drinks down Ketosis – a serious condition that results in the build-up of acidic chemicals in the blood and urine Weight loss Low blood pressure when standing Unlike regular pregnancy sickness, HG may not get better by 14 weeks. It may not clear up completely until the baby is born, although some symptoms may improve at around 20 weeks. Treatment There are medications that can be used in pregna Continue reading >>

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