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Morning Sickness Ketosis

Energy On Ketogenic Diet

Energy On Ketogenic Diet

A lot of people have been asking me about my energy on the Ketogenic Diet. Not only does the food I eat matter, but also the supplements I take. I believe our food doesn’t contain as much nutrition as it did 30, 50 years ago due to factory farming (soil degradation), genetic modifications, shipping from 1000’s miles away. We don’t get adequate amounts of nutrition from just our food. I believe we need to be consuming more superfoods and certain supplements. We have also forgotten about whole foods that provide us with so much goodness like raw milk, stews in cast iron pots and kefir made from bacteria and yeast. Pictured above are most of my daily/weekly supplements. Not pictured is a chromium supplement and stevia vanilla sweetner. On top of my high fat, very low carbohydrate diet, I depend on these products to fuel me. Inner-eco probiotic in coconut water is the best bang for your buck per serving. 1 tablespoon delivers 100 billion probiotics! Our immune system lives in our gut and it is of the utmost importance we take care of it. My next adventure is making my own coconut milk kefir! Check out the starters and recipe Next are Aloha products. WOW, I can not say enough great things about this company! Their customer service is brilliant and their products are delicious. Go now and use COLLEEN113 to get $20 off your first order. I’ve been putting the protein in coconut milk, chia seed, cinnamon and flaxseed pudding. Place everything in jars overnight. High nutrition, fast and easy. Crio Bru is a new product I purchased last night because I have a french press at the BBA studio. Instead of coffee, cocoa beans offer an energy and antioxidant alternative. IT. IS. SPECTACULAR!!! I tried it plain and also with a splash of creamer. It tastes of rich chocolate. I boug Continue reading >>

About Sky News

About Sky News

The Duchess of Cambridge is once again suffering from a rare condition that causes severe morning sickness. This time the Duchess is being cared for at Kensington Palace, but she has previously been admitted to hospital for the condition. The severity of the vomiting caused by hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to dehydration, weight loss and a build-up of toxins in the blood or urine called ketosis. Hyperemesis gravidarum affects 3.5 per 1,000 pregnant women and can cause women to vomit blood. Sky News science correspondent Thomas Moore said: "The first step would be to get a woman on to a drip as soon as possible, get some fluid back into her bloodstream. "If that doesn't settle things, doctors can in fact stick a tube all the way through the stomach into the small intestines to make sure there is some nutrition getting into the mother. "There would also be the possibility of medication." :: Kate and William are expecting third child During the Duchess' first pregnancy, hyperemesis gravidarum sufferer Jennifer Burner told Sky News: "I think what makes it so difficult is that not many people understand it. What you are going through is deemed by many people as normal, they just think you are being sick quite a lot. "I was sick over 35 times a day, every day until the 35th week of my pregnancy, which means you lose weight. In my case I was put on drips to be rehydrated, put on steroids to keep my body warning. "I have never had normal morning sickness but I don't believe it is quite like that." Retired midwife Val Clarke told Sky News in 2012: "It often happens in very slim young ladies who - I don't know the reason why - become pregnant and the demands of the pregnancy are overwhelming to the point that vomiting becomes much more severe much earlier. "Poor Kate, it would Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Practice Essentials Hyperemesis gravidarum is the most severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, characterized by persistent nausea and vomiting associated with ketosis and weight loss (>5% of prepregnancy weight). This condition may cause volume depletion, electrolytes and acid-base imbalances, nutritional deficiencies, and even death. Severe hyperemesis requiring hospital admission occurs in 0.3-2% of pregnancies. [1] Signs and symptoms The defining symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum are gastrointestinal in nature and include nausea and vomiting. Other common symptoms include ptyalism (excessive salivation), fatigue, weakness, and dizziness. Patients may also experience the following: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis Physical examination in women with suspected hyperemesis gravidarum is usually unremarkable. Findings may be more helpful if the patient has unusual complaints suggestive of other disorders (eg, bleeding, abdominal pain). Examination includes the following: Vital signs, including standing and lying blood pressure and pulse Volume status (eg, mucous membrane condition, skin turgor, neck veins, mental status) General appearance (eg, nutrition, weight) Laboratory tests Initial laboratory studies used in the evaluation of women with hyperemesis gravidarum should include the following: Imaging studies The following imaging studies may be used to assess women with hyperemesis gravidarum: Obstetric ultrasonography: Usually warranted to evaluate for multiple gestations or trophoblastic disease Upper abdominal ultrasonography: If clinically indicated, to evaluate the pancreas and/or biliary tree Abdominal computed tomography scanning or magnetic resonance imaging: If appendicitis is suspected as a cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnanc Continue reading >>

Duchess's Rare Illness Could Mean She Is Expecting Twins: Doctors Reassure Wills And Kate That Condition Is Not Dangerous If Treated (and Could Mean Double Baby Joy)

Duchess's Rare Illness Could Mean She Is Expecting Twins: Doctors Reassure Wills And Kate That Condition Is Not Dangerous If Treated (and Could Mean Double Baby Joy)

Duchess of Cambridge 'dehydrated' after developing acute morning sickness She will be kept in hospital as a precautionary measure - royal sources Duchess likely to be between six and eight weeks pregnant Morning sickness can be triggered by enlarged placenta This could signal multiple births such as twins or triplets Medics reassure couple that treatment will keep mother and baby healthy Atomic Kitten star Jenny Frost, who is expecting twins, and TV presenter Kirstie Allsop suffer from same condition The acute morning sickness suffered by the Duchess of Cambridge causes nausea for up to five months of pregnancy or even until the birth - and it increases the chance of having twins. Known as hyperemesis gravidarum, it afflicts one pregnancy in 50 and is much more serious than the nausea commonly experienced by expectant mothers. The condition can lead to severe dehydration and puts both mother and baby at risk of being deprived of essential nutrients. Sufferers can be left vomiting up to 30 times a day, with exhausting and hazardous consequences. They cannot eat or drink without retching and may lose up to 10 per cent of their body weight, which can trigger a build-up of toxins in the blood or urine known as ketosis as the body tries to compensate for lack of food by mouth. Hospital treatment for these women is essential, as without intravenous feeding and fluids they are at risk of becoming dangerously dehydrated. Experts revealed last night that there is a ‘tiny excess’ of women who give birth to twins after enduring the condition. An enlarged placenta - which is a known risk factor for morning sickness - is more common in multiple pregnancies, such as twins or triplets, or during a molar pregnancy, where the fertilisation of the egg goes wrong and leads to an abnor Continue reading >>

Severe Vomiting During Pregnancy (hyperemesis Gravidarum)

Severe Vomiting During Pregnancy (hyperemesis Gravidarum)

Nausea and vomiting are common in pregnancy, especially in the first trimester. Some pregnant women experience excessive nausea and vomiting. This condition is known as ‘hyperemesis gravidarum’ and often needs hospital treatment. Hyperemesis gravidarum isn’t common but it can be severe. It’s much worse than morning sickness. If you’re being sick all the time and can’t keep food down, tell your midwife or doctor as soon as possible. Symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum Excessive vomiting in pregnancy is much worse than the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness. Symptoms usually start between 5 and 10 weeks of pregnancy and resolve by 20 weeks. Signs and symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum include: prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting dehydration ketosis – a serious condition that is caused by a raised number of ketones in the blood and urine (ketones are poisonous acidic chemicals that are produced when your body breaks down fat, rather than glucose, for energy) weight loss low blood pressure (hypotension) when standing up. The nausea and vomiting are usually so severe that it’s impossible to keep any fluids down, and this can cause dehydration and weight loss. Dehydration is when you don’t have enough fluids in your body. Treating hyperemesis gravidarum Hyperemesis gravidarum if severe may need specialist treatment, and you may need to be admitted to hospital so that doctors can assess your condition and give you the right treatment. This can include intravenous fluids given through a drip to treat the ketosis and treatment to stop the vomiting. Hyperemesis gravidarum is unpleasant with dramatic symptoms, but the good news is it’s unlikely to harm your baby. However, if it causes you to lose weight during pregnancy there is an increased risk that Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Kate Middleton's recent pregnancy put Hyperemesis gravidarum into the headlines. But what is this condition all about? Women expect to throw up during the first months of pregnancy; morning sickness is a rite of passage for many expecting mothers. But no one expects this typical pregnancy symptom to morph into a monster that can threaten the health—and sometimes the lives—of a mom and baby. Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is an extreme form of morning sickness, defined by the Hyperemesis Education and Research Foundation as “unrelenting, excessive pregnancy-related nausea and/or vomiting that prevents adequate intake of food and fluids.” You may have learned about the condition when it landed Kate Middleton in the hospital while she was pregnant with Prince George. She has since suffered from the illness twice more with her following two pregnancies. Affecting about one to three percent of women, HG can lead to weight loss, malnutrition and dehydration. In severe cases, it can lead to miscarriage and, rarely, it can be fatal. I had HG with my third pregnancy. I lost 15 pounds, broke the blood vessels in my eyes from vomiting so much and had to take three months of sick leave. I often spent the day on the bathroom floor, too weak to get up. “You know that sick feeling you have right before you throw up?” says Erin Rundquist, an Ottawa mother of three who lost 40 pounds in her first pregnancy due to HG. “Imagine that 24 hours a day for nine months. Throwing up 20 to 30 times was a good day.” Gideon Koren, a paediatrician, pharmacologist, and the director of the Motherisk program at Toronto’s Sick Kids Hospital, says that pregnant women who are throwing up or nauseated—especially those who can’t eat or drink—need to discuss treatment with their doctors Continue reading >>

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Whether you just started following my blog or have been at it for years, you know I have a special interest in prenatal nutrition. That means I inevitably get a lot of questions about what I personally ate during pregnancy. Well, I’m spilling the beans today. Remember last year when I spoke at Paleo f(x)? My talk, The Carbohydrate & Pregnancy Controversy drew a bigger audience than I expected. And little did I know, Leanne of Healthful Pursuit and her assistant were in the audience taking notes. Leanne first reached out to me to set up an interview about ketogenic diets and pregnancy this summer, but alas, with a small baby, no childcare, and life being crazy pants, we got delayed. Like… 6 months delayed. But, you know what? Babies eventually get a little less clingy, eat things other than the milk your body produces (even if they’re still milk monsters), and lo and behold, childcare gets arranged and BAM, things-other-than-babying get done… sometimes. Imagine that?! It’s with great pleasure that I share with you my interview for The Keto Diet Podcast where we cover a whole host of questions about carbs and pregnancy, like whether a low carb or ketogenic diet are safe in pregnancy, how metabolism shifts during pregnancy (and what that means about carbohydrate needs), Qs and As about ketosis, and some important considerations about going low carb while breastfeeding. Listen here or on iTunes (The Keto Diet Podcast, Episode 21) Here are a few highlights from our interview: Is low carb right for everyone? How does low carb affect women with infertility or amenorrhea? Should women eat low carb if they’re having trouble getting pregnant? How do blood sugar levels affect infertility and rates of miscarriage? Are carbs required for pregnancy? Is it safe to stay low Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a pregnancy complication that is characterized by severe nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and possibly dehydration.[1] Signs and symptoms may also include vomiting several times a day and feeling faint.[2] Hyperemesis gravidarum is considered more severe than morning sickness.[2] Often symptoms get better after the 20th week of pregnancy but may last the entire pregnancy duration.[2] The exact causes of hyperemesis gravidarum are unknown.[3] Risk factors include the first pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, obesity, prior or family history of HG, trophoblastic disorder, and a history of eating disorders.[3][4] Diagnosis is usually made based on the observed signs and symptoms.[3] HG has been technically defined as more than three episodes of vomiting per day such that weight loss of 5% or three kilograms has occurred and ketones are present in the urine.[3] Other potential causes of the symptoms should be excluded including urinary tract infection and high thyroid levels.[5] Treatment includes drinking fluids and a bland diet.[2] Recommendations may include electrolyte-replacement drinks, thiamine, and a higher protein diet.[3][7] Some women require intravenous fluids.[2] With respect to medications pyridoxine or metoclopramide are preferred.[5] Prochlorperazine, dimenhydrinate, or ondansetron may be used if these are not effective.[3][5] Hospitalization may be required.[3] Psychotherapy may improve outcomes.[3] Evidence for acupressure is poor.[3] While vomiting in pregnancy has been described as early as 2,000 BC, the first clear medical description of hyperemesis gravidarum was in 1852 by Antoine Dubois.[8] Hyperemesis gravidarum is estimated to affect 0.3–2.0% of pregnant women.[6] While previously known as a common cause of death in pregna Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #021: Pregnancy On Keto

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #021: Pregnancy On Keto

Interview with Lily Nichols, a real food-focused registered dietitian and diabetes educator, chatting about the ins and outs of balancing a ketogenic diet while pregnant. Strategies for amenorrhea and other fertility issues, when to go low-carb during pregnancy, breastfeeding tips, and more. For podcast transcript, scroll down. SHOW NOTES + LINKS Try ZenSweet mixes (international shipping) RSVP for my book tour Subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast app Watch free video series on managing gestational diabetes with real food Watch Leanne’s keto pregnancy video TIMESTAMPS Steps to accepting diet change (19:54) Pregnancy carb requirement (34:50) Fasting when you’re expecting (44:54) PARTNERS OF THE KETO DIET PODCAST Get the nourishment your body deserves and try Vital Proteins collagen protein, gelatin or liver capsules today. The podcast is partnered with Wolfe Clinic Royal Flora, my choice in soil-based probiotics. Get 20% off your soil-based probiotics with the coupon code GUT at checkout. 100% grass-fed & finished FERMENTED beef sticks with 1 billion naturally-occurring, gut-healing probiotics! Go to PaleoValley.com for 20% off. TRANSCRIPT FOR THIS EPISODE Leanne Vogel: You’re listening to episode number 21 of The Keto Diet Podcast. Hey I’m Leanne from Healthfulpursuit.com and this is The Keto Diet Podcast where we’re busting through the restrictive mentality of a traditional ketogenic diet to uncover the life you crave. What’s keto? Keto is a low-carb/high fat diet where we’re switching from a sugar-burning state to a becoming fat burning machines. If you’re in need of keto recipe food prep inspiration, I’ve prepped a free seven day keto meal plan exclusive for podcast listeners. The plan is complete with a shopping list and everything you need Continue reading >>

43: Fat Digestion, Morning Sickness, Binge Eating, Carb Cravings, Steam Room Effect On Ketones

43: Fat Digestion, Morning Sickness, Binge Eating, Carb Cravings, Steam Room Effect On Ketones

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam have another educational and entertaining show for you in Episode 43. **Special THANK YOU to Louann, Laura, Richard, Chris, Pedro, and Diane** KEY QUOTE: “Most women with significant morning sickness have a problem with B6 and B12. These vitamins are fat-soluble and need enough animal fat to absorb them well. If you take the huge prenatal pill with a large dose of folic acid, those can be nauseating by themselves. Eating keto helps prevent this.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 43: – Should I be concerned about the fat related digestion results of my stool analysis? Hi guys, I recently had a CDSA stool analysis to look for more information about my health. Under the absorption category, my fat related di Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Duchess Of Cambridge's Morning Sickness Condition Explained

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Duchess Of Cambridge's Morning Sickness Condition Explained

Kensington Palace have announced the Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant with her third child, adding that she was unable to attend an event due to morning sickness. A Kensington Palace statement said: "Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to announce that the Duchess of Cambridge is expecting their third child. "The Queen and members of both families are delighted with the news. "As with her previous two pregnancies, the Duchess is suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum. "Her Royal Highness will no longer carry out her planned engagement at the Hornsey Road Children's Centre in London today. "The Duchess is being cared for at Kensington Palace." The Duchess, who is under 12 weeks pregnant, has suffered from Hyperemesis gravidarum - a very severe form of morning sickness - during both of her previous pregnancies. At a glance | Hyperemesis gravidarum Some pregnant women experience excessive nausea and vomiting. They might be sick many times a day and be unable to keep food or drink down, which can have a negative effect on their daily life. The condition, known as hyperemesis gravidarum, is more severe than morning sickness and often needs hospital treatment. Signs and symptoms Prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting – some women report being sick up to 50 times a day Dehydration – not having enough fluids in your body because you can't keep drinks down Ketosis – a serious condition that results in the build-up of acidic chemicals in the blood and urine Weight loss Low blood pressure when standing Unlike regular pregnancy sickness, HG may not get better by 14 weeks. It may not clear up completely until the baby is born, although some symptoms may improve at around 20 weeks. Treatment There are medications that can be used in pregna Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Treatment Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Go to: Abstract Hyperemesis gravidarum, or pernicious vomiting of pregnancy, is a complication of pregnancy that affects various areas of the woman’s health, including homeostasis, electrolytes, and kidney function, and may have adverse fetal consequences. Recent research now provides additional guidelines for protection against and relief from hyperemesis gravidarum. Alterations to maternal diet and lifestyle can have protective effects. Medicinal methods of prevention and treatment include nutritional supplements and alternative methods, such as hypnosis and acupuncture, as well as pharmacotherapy. Key words: Hyperemesis gravidarum, Nausea, Vomiting, Pregnancy Hyperemesis gravidarum, or pernicious vomiting of pregnancy, is a complication of pregnancy that affects various areas of the woman’s health, including homeostasis, electrolytes, and kidney function, and may have adverse fetal consequences. Nausea and vomiting are common in pregnancy, affecting up to 70% to 85% of pregnant women.1 Hyperemesis affects between 0.3% and 2.3% of all pregnancies.2 The condition is defined as uncontrolled vomiting requiring hospitalization, severe dehydration, muscle wasting, electrolyte imbalance, ketonuria, and weight loss of more than 5% of body weight.3 Most of these patients also have hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and a low serum urea level.4 Ptyalism is also a typical symptom of hyperemesis.5 The symptoms of this disorder usually peak at 9 weeks of gestation and subside by approximately 20 weeks of gestation.6 Approximately 1% to 5% of patients with hyperemesis must be hospitalized.7 Women who experienced hyperemesis in their first pregnancy have a high risk for recurrence.6,8,9 The differential diagnosis of hyperemesis gravidarum (Table 1) includes urinary tract infection, ure Continue reading >>

The Real Cause Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

The Real Cause Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

Preventing HG Podcast: Hyperemesis Gravidarum | Pregnancy | Morning Sickness | Nutrition | Root Causes | Alternative Treatmen © All Rights Reserved. 2014 Dr. Michael Fox is not the first person to suggest that the cause of morning sickness and hyperemesis gravidarum starts with blood sugar dysregulation but he is one of the few OB-GYN and Reproductive Endocrinologists who suggests that eating a ketogenic diet during pregnancy is not only safe for mom and baby but also the answer to this blood sugar dysregulation. Dr. Fox thinks that the problem starts with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), then gets worse when women eat carbohydrates (which turn into sugar in the blood) to combat the nausea (crackers anyone?), which can spike insulin 2-3 times what it would be in a non-pregnant woman, then add in dehydration, which makes everything worse, loss of nutrients (from vomiting and not eating) (especially magnesium, zinc and b vitamins) and so begins the cascade of symptoms that spirals out of control leaving the newly pregnant women feeling like she's dying with no hope of coming out of it. Add in doctors and nurses telling a women that it's "normal" and there is nothing that can be done and you have a very bad scene. In this episode we discuss: Ideal diet for Fertility, pregnancy, and beyond Fat provides the most sustained energy for the longest length of time Carbs= Sugar "Fat protects you against hypoglycemia better than any other macronutrient." Minimum time to be on diet to prepare for pregnancy, 6 weeks. 12 weeks would be ideal. Older cultures had special foods and preparations for fertile couples to have healthy babies. It's hard to convince women that they need to eat a lot of fat If ketosis was bad, we wouldn't be here. Not enough studies about nutritional ketosis and Continue reading >>

What Is Hyperemesis Gravidarum (severe Morning Sickness)?

What Is Hyperemesis Gravidarum (severe Morning Sickness)?

Hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. (1) In fact, the words ‘hyperemesis’ (pronounced ‘hye-pur-em-ee-sis’) and ‘gravidarum’ (pronounced ‘gra-vid-ah-room’) literally translate to ‘excessive vomiting’ ‘during pregnancy’. (10) What are the symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum (HEG)? The main symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum are: continued and severe nausea and vomiting – particularly if vomiting occurs more than 3-4 times a day and prevents one from keeping down food or fluids weight loss – which may be over 10% of body weight nutritional deficiencies infrequent urination dehydration – which in turn may cause headaches, palpitations, confusion and hypotension (low blood pressure) when standing fainting feeling tired and dizzy ketosis caused by a raised number of poisonous acidic chemicals in the blood pale skin jaundice muscle wasting Ptyalism – excessive secretion of saliva (1-4, 13) How long does hyperemesis gravidarum last? Hyperemesis gravidarum can last much longer than normal morning sickness – which tends to settle down around 12-14 weeks of pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum generally diminishes around 21 weeks into the pregnancy, but it may continue much longer. (1, 2) What causes hyperemesis gravidarum? There are several theories regarding what causes hyperemesis gravidarum. Some theories concern the hormonal changes that occur in pregnancy. In particular, theories focus on the increase in human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This hormone is said to be associated with the peak in symptoms of morning sickness. There have been difficulties with directly demonstrating a link between hCG concentrations and severity of morning sickness however due to the variation in hCG concentrations in the popu Continue reading >>

Extreme Morning Sickness: Explaining The Illness The Duchess Of Cambridge Is Suffering From

Extreme Morning Sickness: Explaining The Illness The Duchess Of Cambridge Is Suffering From

INDYPULSE Extreme morning sickness: explaining the illness the Duchess of Cambridge is suffering from The Duchess of Cambridge has announced she is expecting her second child and, like her pregnancy with Prince George, is suffering from acute morning sickness – or hyperemesis gravidarum. But what exactly is hyperemesis gravidarum? Hyperemesis gravidarum, put simply, is extreme morning sickness and is highly unusual. Symptoms can include prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, weight loss and hypotension (low blood pressure when standing up). Women can also suffer from ketosis, a condition caused by an increased number of ketones (poisonous acidic chemical produced when your body breaks down fat, rather than glucose, for energy) in your blood. Video: The Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant again Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00Playback Rate1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected CaptionsAudio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDone Often the vomiting and nausea are so severe pregnant Continue reading >>

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