diabetestalk.net

Morning Sickness Ketosis

Natural Morning Sickness Remedies

Natural Morning Sickness Remedies

“Tried that, didn’t work” is a common phrase we hear about morning sickness remedies. Why is that, and are there evidence-based ways to ease pregnancy nausea? Those are the questions we’re going to dive into today. If you haven’t read it yet, earlier this week we talked about the causes of morning sickness, and how I managed to avoid it with pregnancy #2 and #3 using nutrition and supplements. In this post we’ll cover tips for easing nausea and food aversions while getting your baby the best nourishment possible. Before we jump in, though, please keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment – a full disclaimer can be found here. Okay, on to the post! Morning Sickness Remedies We’re all unique and some remedies may work better than others based on each mama’s situation, but one thing to consider before writing off a remedy is that most need some time to do their thing. According to Dr. Amy O’Donnell, who co-authored a study on several of the remedies we’ll be discussing (ginger, vitamin B6 and acupressure), “The evidence suggests that if these measures are going to be effective, they’ll start to help within three to four days.” (source) With that in mind, here are some suggestions for easing (or possibly preventing) nausea during pregnancy. #1- Magnesium Okay, I know just about everything seems to relate back to magnesium these days. Dog’s tail turned blue? Magnesium deficiency! Bus was late? Magnesium deficiency! But here’s the deal: Magnesium really does play a critical role in over 300 enzymatic reactions within the body, impacting everything from energy metabolism and stress management to hormone balance, detoxification, Continue reading >>

Keto During Pregnancy

Keto During Pregnancy

I get a ton of emails a few months after these consults telling me that they are ecstatic and are now pregnant but are wondering on what to eat now. As if this diet of REAL food would be harmful to a fetus. There are many reasons why to not add in certain foods like gluten and dairy. Many times when cravings get the best of pregnant clients and they consume these foods, the auto-immune response can result in a miscarriage. But even if the clients are committed about staying away from gluten and dairy, they often worry that too low of carbs is bad for the fetus. You will never find evidence of this, but you will read it all over the web. The information that clients read have a few flaws: 1. A huge mistake is when people and doctors compare benign dietary ketosis to diabetic ketoacidosis. You can produce ketones in a starvation state. So instead of using a well-formulated low carb diet, they starved pregnant rats to get them into ketosis. The flaw in that evidence should be obvious. 2. The last form of this “evidence” is when they sliced up the brains of rat fetuses and saturated them in ketones. What happened was that the brain cells lived but it stopped producing new brain cells. This is thought to be evidence that ketosis causes retardation. Now let’s dive into the facts. The lean human body is 74% fat and 26% protein by calories. Fats are a structural part of every human cell and the preferred fuel source of the mitochondria, the energy-burning units of each cell. A fetus naturally uses ketones before and immediately after birth. Many studies done on pregnant pigs that are placed on ketogenic diets have fetuses with “increased fetal brain weight, cell size and protein content. In the early stages of pregnancy there is an upsurge in body fat accumulation, whic Continue reading >>

Is Low Carb And Keto Safe During Pregnancy?

Is Low Carb And Keto Safe During Pregnancy?

When Carolina Cartier discovered she was pregnant with twins this past March, she never questioned whether she would continue eating a ketogenic diet. The 31-year-old Seattle area woman had been plagued by metabolic issues literally all her life: precocious puberty at age 3; polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) by age 14; weight gain of 320 lbs (145 kg) on her 6 foot (183 cm) frame and pre-diabetes by her 20s. Her PCOS caused her ovaries to be enlarged and covered in cysts. She was told she was infertile and likely never able to have children. In August 2014, aged 28, her health was so poor that she went on medical disability from her job as a financial analyst. That first month off, however, she discovered and adopted the ketogenic diet. Between summer 2014 and February 2017, she lost 120 lbs (54 kg), experienced her first ever natural menstrual period that gradually established into a regular 28-day cycle; her blood sugar normalized and her ovaries reduced to 3.5 cm (< 1.5 inches) size. Her long-standing depression lifted. While she lost two early pregnancies at the start of 2016, likely because of poor egg quality, she knew she was getting healthier every day. Her positive pregnancy test in March 2017 was a happy surprise, as was the news soon after that she was carrying healthy twins. Except for a bout of extreme nausea and sea sickness for a week on a low-carb cruise early in this pregnancy, she has adhered to the ketogenic diet now through to 20 weeks of pregnancy and counting. She plans to continue this way of eating for the rest of her life. She feels great and looks wonderful; the twins in utero are thriving. “My life is transformed. Why would I even consider abandoning this way of eating when all of my positive health changes, and my pregnancy, I owe to this d Continue reading >>

Severe Vomiting During Pregnancy (hyperemesis Gravidarum)

Severe Vomiting During Pregnancy (hyperemesis Gravidarum)

Nausea and vomiting are common in pregnancy, especially in the first trimester. Some pregnant women experience excessive nausea and vomiting. This condition is known as ‘hyperemesis gravidarum’ and often needs hospital treatment. Hyperemesis gravidarum isn’t common but it can be severe. It’s much worse than morning sickness. If you’re being sick all the time and can’t keep food down, tell your midwife or doctor as soon as possible. Symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum Excessive vomiting in pregnancy is much worse than the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness. Symptoms usually start between 5 and 10 weeks of pregnancy and resolve by 20 weeks. Signs and symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum include: prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting dehydration ketosis – a serious condition that is caused by a raised number of ketones in the blood and urine (ketones are poisonous acidic chemicals that are produced when your body breaks down fat, rather than glucose, for energy) weight loss low blood pressure (hypotension) when standing up. The nausea and vomiting are usually so severe that it’s impossible to keep any fluids down, and this can cause dehydration and weight loss. Dehydration is when you don’t have enough fluids in your body. Treating hyperemesis gravidarum Hyperemesis gravidarum if severe may need specialist treatment, and you may need to be admitted to hospital so that doctors can assess your condition and give you the right treatment. This can include intravenous fluids given through a drip to treat the ketosis and treatment to stop the vomiting. Hyperemesis gravidarum is unpleasant with dramatic symptoms, but the good news is it’s unlikely to harm your baby. However, if it causes you to lose weight during pregnancy there is an increased risk that Continue reading >>

Energy On Ketogenic Diet

Energy On Ketogenic Diet

A lot of people have been asking me about my energy on the Ketogenic Diet. Not only does the food I eat matter, but also the supplements I take. I believe our food doesn’t contain as much nutrition as it did 30, 50 years ago due to factory farming (soil degradation), genetic modifications, shipping from 1000’s miles away. We don’t get adequate amounts of nutrition from just our food. I believe we need to be consuming more superfoods and certain supplements. We have also forgotten about whole foods that provide us with so much goodness like raw milk, stews in cast iron pots and kefir made from bacteria and yeast. Pictured above are most of my daily/weekly supplements. Not pictured is a chromium supplement and stevia vanilla sweetner. On top of my high fat, very low carbohydrate diet, I depend on these products to fuel me. Inner-eco probiotic in coconut water is the best bang for your buck per serving. 1 tablespoon delivers 100 billion probiotics! Our immune system lives in our gut and it is of the utmost importance we take care of it. My next adventure is making my own coconut milk kefir! Check out the starters and recipe Next are Aloha products. WOW, I can not say enough great things about this company! Their customer service is brilliant and their products are delicious. Go now and use COLLEEN113 to get $20 off your first order. I’ve been putting the protein in coconut milk, chia seed, cinnamon and flaxseed pudding. Place everything in jars overnight. High nutrition, fast and easy. Crio Bru is a new product I purchased last night because I have a french press at the BBA studio. Instead of coffee, cocoa beans offer an energy and antioxidant alternative. IT. IS. SPECTACULAR!!! I tried it plain and also with a splash of creamer. It tastes of rich chocolate. I boug Continue reading >>

Extreme Morning Sickness: Explaining The Illness The Duchess Of Cambridge Is Suffering From

Extreme Morning Sickness: Explaining The Illness The Duchess Of Cambridge Is Suffering From

INDYPULSE Extreme morning sickness: explaining the illness the Duchess of Cambridge is suffering from The Duchess of Cambridge has announced she is expecting her second child and, like her pregnancy with Prince George, is suffering from acute morning sickness – or hyperemesis gravidarum. But what exactly is hyperemesis gravidarum? Hyperemesis gravidarum, put simply, is extreme morning sickness and is highly unusual. Symptoms can include prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, weight loss and hypotension (low blood pressure when standing up). Women can also suffer from ketosis, a condition caused by an increased number of ketones (poisonous acidic chemical produced when your body breaks down fat, rather than glucose, for energy) in your blood. Video: The Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant again Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00Playback Rate1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected CaptionsAudio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDone Often the vomiting and nausea are so severe pregnant Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Treatment Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Go to: Abstract Hyperemesis gravidarum, or pernicious vomiting of pregnancy, is a complication of pregnancy that affects various areas of the woman’s health, including homeostasis, electrolytes, and kidney function, and may have adverse fetal consequences. Recent research now provides additional guidelines for protection against and relief from hyperemesis gravidarum. Alterations to maternal diet and lifestyle can have protective effects. Medicinal methods of prevention and treatment include nutritional supplements and alternative methods, such as hypnosis and acupuncture, as well as pharmacotherapy. Key words: Hyperemesis gravidarum, Nausea, Vomiting, Pregnancy Hyperemesis gravidarum, or pernicious vomiting of pregnancy, is a complication of pregnancy that affects various areas of the woman’s health, including homeostasis, electrolytes, and kidney function, and may have adverse fetal consequences. Nausea and vomiting are common in pregnancy, affecting up to 70% to 85% of pregnant women.1 Hyperemesis affects between 0.3% and 2.3% of all pregnancies.2 The condition is defined as uncontrolled vomiting requiring hospitalization, severe dehydration, muscle wasting, electrolyte imbalance, ketonuria, and weight loss of more than 5% of body weight.3 Most of these patients also have hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and a low serum urea level.4 Ptyalism is also a typical symptom of hyperemesis.5 The symptoms of this disorder usually peak at 9 weeks of gestation and subside by approximately 20 weeks of gestation.6 Approximately 1% to 5% of patients with hyperemesis must be hospitalized.7 Women who experienced hyperemesis in their first pregnancy have a high risk for recurrence.6,8,9 The differential diagnosis of hyperemesis gravidarum (Table 1) includes urinary tract infection, ure Continue reading >>

Morning Sickness: A Case For Protein

Morning Sickness: A Case For Protein

Image by Pregnancy and Baby Today’s Daily Tip: If you make a mistake and don’t meet your goal one day, don’t use “I’m off the wagon” as an excuse to stop. Get going again at the next opportunity and forget about the slip up! If you are in your first trimester of pregnancy, you might have already experienced a spell of morning sickness. Morning sickness is a common problem occurring in pregnancy with more than half of American women suffering from nausea, vomiting, or both during the first three months of pregnancy, according to the March of Dimes. However, the severity and occurrence vary not only from woman to woman, but also from pregnancy to pregnancy. Some women never even have the slightest bit of queasiness while some are so ill that they wonder how “morning” sickness can last an entire 24 hours. While nobody can pinpoint the exact cause, there are many theories for what is the culprit behind nausea and vomiting during early pregnancy. Reason #1 – Wrong prenatal vitamin You may be taking a low-grade prenatal vitamin that your body is trying to fight off and is having a hard time absorbing, thus causing nausea! Prenatal vitamins should contain 27mg of elemental iron such as ferrous fumarate, chelated, or gluconate. Brands such Rainbow Light, Shaklee, and Whole Foods brand are food-based and your body can absorb these vitamins. Avoid Iron-sulfate! Image by Alphamom Studies have proven that nausea during pregnancy may be nature’s way of protecting the developing baby from toxins and the mother from illness. I have personally seen some of the healthiest women I know have the worst cases of morning sickness, which leads me to believe that their body is very inclined to fighting off toxins. So in attempt to free your body of anything that could poten Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis gravidarum is uncontrollable vomiting during pregnancy that results in dehydration, weight loss, and ketosis. Diagnosis is clinical and by measurement of urine ketones, serum electrolytes, and renal function. Treatment is with temporary suspension of oral intake and with IV fluids, antiemetics if needed, and vitamin and electrolyte repletion. Pregnancy frequently causes nausea and vomiting; the cause appears to be rapidly increasing levels of estrogens or the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG). Vomiting usually develops at about 5 wk gestation, peaks at about 9 wk, and disappears by about 16 or 18 wk. It usually occurs in the morning (as so-called morning sickness), although it can occur any time of day. Women with morning sickness continue to gain weight and do not become dehydrated. Hyperemesis gravidarum is probably an extreme form of normal nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. It can be distinguished because it causes the following: Hyperemesis gravidarum may cause mild, transient hyperthyroidism. Hyperemesis gravidarum that persists past 16 to 18 wk is uncommon but may seriously damage the liver, causing severe centrilobular necrosis or widespread fatty degeneration, and may cause Wernicke encephalopathy or esophageal rupture. Clinicians suspect hyperemesis gravidarum based on symptoms (eg, onset, duration, and frequency of vomiting; exacerbating and relieving factors; type and amount of emesis). Serial weight measurements can support the diagnosis. If hyperemesis gravidarum is suspected, urine ketones, thyroid-stimulating hormone, serum electrolytes, BUN, creatinine, AST, ALT, magnesium, phosphorus, and sometimes body weight are measured. Obstetric ultrasonography should be done to rule out hydatidiform mole and multifetal pregnan Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: When It’s Not Just Morning Sickness

Kate Middleton's recent pregnancy put Hyperemesis gravidarum into the headlines. But what is this condition all about? Women expect to throw up during the first months of pregnancy; morning sickness is a rite of passage for many expecting mothers. But no one expects this typical pregnancy symptom to morph into a monster that can threaten the health—and sometimes the lives—of a mom and baby. Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is an extreme form of morning sickness, defined by the Hyperemesis Education and Research Foundation as “unrelenting, excessive pregnancy-related nausea and/or vomiting that prevents adequate intake of food and fluids.” You may have learned about the condition when it landed Kate Middleton in the hospital while she was pregnant with Prince George. She has since suffered from the illness twice more with her following two pregnancies. Affecting about one to three percent of women, HG can lead to weight loss, malnutrition and dehydration. In severe cases, it can lead to miscarriage and, rarely, it can be fatal. I had HG with my third pregnancy. I lost 15 pounds, broke the blood vessels in my eyes from vomiting so much and had to take three months of sick leave. I often spent the day on the bathroom floor, too weak to get up. “You know that sick feeling you have right before you throw up?” says Erin Rundquist, an Ottawa mother of three who lost 40 pounds in her first pregnancy due to HG. “Imagine that 24 hours a day for nine months. Throwing up 20 to 30 times was a good day.” Gideon Koren, a paediatrician, pharmacologist, and the director of the Motherisk program at Toronto’s Sick Kids Hospital, says that pregnant women who are throwing up or nauseated—especially those who can’t eat or drink—need to discuss treatment with their doctors Continue reading >>

About Sky News

About Sky News

The Duchess of Cambridge is once again suffering from a rare condition that causes severe morning sickness. This time the Duchess is being cared for at Kensington Palace, but she has previously been admitted to hospital for the condition. The severity of the vomiting caused by hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to dehydration, weight loss and a build-up of toxins in the blood or urine called ketosis. Hyperemesis gravidarum affects 3.5 per 1,000 pregnant women and can cause women to vomit blood. Sky News science correspondent Thomas Moore said: "The first step would be to get a woman on to a drip as soon as possible, get some fluid back into her bloodstream. "If that doesn't settle things, doctors can in fact stick a tube all the way through the stomach into the small intestines to make sure there is some nutrition getting into the mother. "There would also be the possibility of medication." :: Kate and William are expecting third child During the Duchess' first pregnancy, hyperemesis gravidarum sufferer Jennifer Burner told Sky News: "I think what makes it so difficult is that not many people understand it. What you are going through is deemed by many people as normal, they just think you are being sick quite a lot. "I was sick over 35 times a day, every day until the 35th week of my pregnancy, which means you lose weight. In my case I was put on drips to be rehydrated, put on steroids to keep my body warning. "I have never had normal morning sickness but I don't believe it is quite like that." Retired midwife Val Clarke told Sky News in 2012: "It often happens in very slim young ladies who - I don't know the reason why - become pregnant and the demands of the pregnancy are overwhelming to the point that vomiting becomes much more severe much earlier. "Poor Kate, it would Continue reading >>

What Causes Morning Sickness?

What Causes Morning Sickness?

Ahhh, morning sickness. The quintessential pregnancy experience in which a woman heaves a whole plate of eggs into her own hair – ask me how I know. No other mammals seem to vomit during pregnancy, so what makes us so . . . uh . . . special? (source) While there’s no perfect answer to this question, today we’re going to dive in to the top theories about what causes morning – or more accurately anytime sickness – and in the next post we’ll discuss morning sickness remedies that may help. As always, please keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only and is based on the opinions of the author. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment – a full disclaimer can be found here. Okay, let’s jump in! What causes morning sickness? Morning sickness affects about 70-80% of all pregnant women. (Lee 2011) It’s probably caused by a combination of factors, including hormones, nutrient status, genetic factors and sometimes the presence of certain bacteria in the gut. Some researchers also believe it has a protective component – in other words, they believe morning sickness causes women to avoid foods that may be contaminated or spoiled. Understanding the possible causes may help mamas avoid or reduce the severity or duration of nausea during pregnancy. Let’s take a look at the top theories about what causes morning sickness and what the research says about them. Theory #1- Morning Sickness Is Protective This theory – which has been popularized by two Cornell biologists – “suggests that morning sickness and the aversion to potentially harmful foods is the body’s way of preserving wellness of the mother at a time when her immune system is naturally suppressed (to prevent rejection of th Continue reading >>

The Real Cause Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

The Real Cause Of Hyperemesis Gravidarum?

Preventing HG Podcast: Hyperemesis Gravidarum | Pregnancy | Morning Sickness | Nutrition | Root Causes | Alternative Treatmen © All Rights Reserved. 2014 Dr. Michael Fox is not the first person to suggest that the cause of morning sickness and hyperemesis gravidarum starts with blood sugar dysregulation but he is one of the few OB-GYN and Reproductive Endocrinologists who suggests that eating a ketogenic diet during pregnancy is not only safe for mom and baby but also the answer to this blood sugar dysregulation. Dr. Fox thinks that the problem starts with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), then gets worse when women eat carbohydrates (which turn into sugar in the blood) to combat the nausea (crackers anyone?), which can spike insulin 2-3 times what it would be in a non-pregnant woman, then add in dehydration, which makes everything worse, loss of nutrients (from vomiting and not eating) (especially magnesium, zinc and b vitamins) and so begins the cascade of symptoms that spirals out of control leaving the newly pregnant women feeling like she's dying with no hope of coming out of it. Add in doctors and nurses telling a women that it's "normal" and there is nothing that can be done and you have a very bad scene. In this episode we discuss: Ideal diet for Fertility, pregnancy, and beyond Fat provides the most sustained energy for the longest length of time Carbs= Sugar "Fat protects you against hypoglycemia better than any other macronutrient." Minimum time to be on diet to prepare for pregnancy, 6 weeks. 12 weeks would be ideal. Older cultures had special foods and preparations for fertile couples to have healthy babies. It's hard to convince women that they need to eat a lot of fat If ketosis was bad, we wouldn't be here. Not enough studies about nutritional ketosis and Continue reading >>

My Low Carb Twin Pregnancy Journey

My Low Carb Twin Pregnancy Journey

I realize this is much different than my regular food based posts, but none the less one that has raised many an inbox question. I just reached the halfway mark of my pregnancy with what we now believe to be two baby girls. We are so thrilled! We are expecting fraternal twins which means they are not identical. Basically two babies sharing the same birthday, but unique in every other way. We can’t wait to meet them! It was really funny and ever so slightly ironic that I had to test oodles of recipes for my recipe book in my first few weeks of pregnancy. YES! Nausea and new recipes… fun! But as they say, all is well that ends well. 1. WHY DID I CHOOSE TO CONTINUE WITH A LOW CARB LIFESTYLE DURING MY PREGNANCY? My family has been on a fully integrated low carb lifestyle for just over 18 months now. It is our new normal. It is our lifestyle. We cannot imagine feeling tired, emotional and hungry all the time anymore, so for me it made perfect sense to keep doing what is obviously working for my body. BUT the fact that I am also making decisions for someone else’s body… it made me ponder if I’m doing the right thing for them? I found confirmation after confirmation once I stopped reading pregnancy sites and shifted my research to what babies need for healthy growth. I devoted an entire chapter in my book to this. Basically, I looked at my entire nutritional regime and could not think of a time in my life that I actually ate a better amount of nutrients and less junk. I figured… our girls do not need junk like preservatives, colorants, enhancers, modified starches, hormone filled GMO Soy or GMO wheat. Sugar is void of any nutrients and really is the weakest form of energy so… not needed! I was shocked to see that most recommended pregnancy diets actually promoted Continue reading >>

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Are Carbs Required For Pregnancy?

Whether you just started following my blog or have been at it for years, you know I have a special interest in prenatal nutrition. That means I inevitably get a lot of questions about what I personally ate during pregnancy. Well, I’m spilling the beans today. Remember last year when I spoke at Paleo f(x)? My talk, The Carbohydrate & Pregnancy Controversy drew a bigger audience than I expected. And little did I know, Leanne of Healthful Pursuit and her assistant were in the audience taking notes. Leanne first reached out to me to set up an interview about ketogenic diets and pregnancy this summer, but alas, with a small baby, no childcare, and life being crazy pants, we got delayed. Like… 6 months delayed. But, you know what? Babies eventually get a little less clingy, eat things other than the milk your body produces (even if they’re still milk monsters), and lo and behold, childcare gets arranged and BAM, things-other-than-babying get done… sometimes. Imagine that?! It’s with great pleasure that I share with you my interview for The Keto Diet Podcast where we cover a whole host of questions about carbs and pregnancy, like whether a low carb or ketogenic diet are safe in pregnancy, how metabolism shifts during pregnancy (and what that means about carbohydrate needs), Qs and As about ketosis, and some important considerations about going low carb while breastfeeding. Listen here or on iTunes (The Keto Diet Podcast, Episode 21) Here are a few highlights from our interview: Is low carb right for everyone? How does low carb affect women with infertility or amenorrhea? Should women eat low carb if they’re having trouble getting pregnant? How do blood sugar levels affect infertility and rates of miscarriage? Are carbs required for pregnancy? Is it safe to stay low Continue reading >>

More in ketosis