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Metformin Mnemonics

High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

When acidosis is present on blood tests, the first step in determining the cause is determining the anion gap. If the anion gap is high (>12 mEq/L), there are several potential causes. High anion gap metabolic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis characterized by a high anion gap (a medical value based on the concentrations of ions in a patient's serum). An anion gap is usually considered to be high if it is over 12 mEq/L. High anion gap metabolic acidosis is caused generally by acid produced by the body,. More rarely, high anion gap metabolic acidosis may be caused by ingesting methanol or overdosing on aspirin.[1][2] The Delta Ratio is a formula that can be used to assess elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis and to evaluate whether mixed acid base disorder (metabolic acidosis) is present. The list of agents that cause high anion gap metabolic acidosis is similar to but broader than the list of agents that cause a serum osmolal gap. Causes[edit] Causes include: The newest mnemonic was proposed in The Lancet reflecting current causes of anion gap metabolic acidosis:[3] G — glycols (ethylene glycol & propylene glycol) O — oxoproline, a metabolite of paracetamol L — L-lactate, the chemical responsible for lactic acidosis D — D-lactate M — methanol A — aspirin R — renal failure K — ketoacidosis, ketones generated from starvation, alcohol, and diabetic ketoacidosis The mnemonic MUDPILES is commonly used to remember the causes of increased anion gap metabolic acidosis.[4][5] M — Methanol U — Uremia (chronic kidney failure) D — Diabetic ketoacidosis P — Paracetamol, Propylene glycol (used as an inactive stabilizer in many medications; historically, the "P" also stood for Paraldehyde, though this substance is not commonly used today) I — Infectio Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs - Endocrine - Medbullets Step 1

Diabetes Drugs - Endocrine - Medbullets Step 1

Metformin is absolutely contraindicated in patients with renal failure due to the risk of lactic acidosis. An elevated serum creatinine suggests a decrease in GFR and the presence of renal failure. Metformin is a drug in the biguanide class used to treat diabetes mellitus type II. Metformin treats hyperglycemia by inhibiting gluconeogenesis. Metformin carries no risk of hypoglycemia, but is known to occasionally cause lactic acidosis in patients with renal failure, liver dysfunction, CHF, alcoholism, and sepsis. Vecchio et al. reviews metformin-induced lactic acidosis. They report that metformin is overall a safe drug when correctly used but is associated with lactic acidosis in rare cases. The most common condition in which this condition occurs is with renal insufficiency. Recent evidence has called into question the significance of the risk of lactic acidosis while using metformin. According to an April 2012 Cochrane review by Salpeter et al., there is no evidence from comparative trials or from observational cohort studies that metformin is associated with an increased risk of lactic acidosis when compared to other anti-hyperglycemic treatments. Illustration A depicts the actions of metformin on the liver, adipose tissue, muscle and pancreas. Answers 1-4: Hyperkalemia, hypernatremia, metabolic alkalosis, and hyperglycemia do not affect the physiology of metformin and are not a contraindication to its use. Continue reading >>

Your Essential Guide To Metformin

Your Essential Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the first-line agent in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It may be used alone or in combination with other medicines, such as sulfonylureas or insulin. Metformin (Glucophage) is a member of the biguanide class of antidiabetic drugs. It lowers blood glucose levels by enhancing the sensitivity of insulin. Metformin achieves this by suppressing hepatic glucose production glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. Along with the suppression of glucose production, Metformin works to increase the uptake of glucose by skeletal muscle. It also reduces intestinal absorption of glucose. One of the great advantages about Metformin is that, unlike other antidiabetic medicines, it doesnt cause weight gain. This, in the long term, helps to control glucose levels even further. Metformin is also used to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome. Metformin is associated with its own range of potential side effects. This profile includes: A propensity to develop gastrointestinal side effects such as nausea, vomiting, anorexia, cramps, increased flatulence and diarrhea. Metformin is also known to cause taste disturbances. Metformin is also linked to the rare but potentially serious lactic acidosis. Long-term use of metformin is associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Along with these side effects, there are many other clinical matters to consider. When we talk about Metformin, we need to think about the following clinical factors: That Metformin is excreted unchanged by the kidney. This means its use should be limited in those with advanced renal damage and that a dose reduction is necessary in those with moderate renal damage. Metformin use should be withdrawn in cases of acute alcohol intoxication. Excess alcohol, along with Metformin, may precipitate lactic acidosis. In addition, use o Continue reading >>

Know These Anti-diabetic Meds For The Internal Med Shelf & Abim Board Exams

Know These Anti-diabetic Meds For The Internal Med Shelf & Abim Board Exams

Know these Anti-Diabetic Meds for the Internal Med Shelf & ABIM Board Exams Earlier in #EndoWeek, we shared high-yield, ABIM and internal medicine shelf exam-relevant endocrinology pearls , including important information regarding diabetes. Today, we provide a quick review of the important characteristics of diabetic medications: Sulfonylureas (eg. Glipizide, Glimepiride, Glyburide) use cautiously in elderly individuals as can cause hypoglycemia Most common medication is Metformin, which is often the initial drug of choice in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus Avoid in females who have creatinine level of 1.4 mg/dl or higher and males with creatinine of 1.5 mg/dl or higher Can cause nausea, diarrhea and rarely lactic acidosis Thiazolidinediones (a.k.a. glitazones) (eg. Rosiglitazone, Pioglitazone) Should be avoided in patients with NYHA congestive heart failure class III or IV oral agent of choice in renal insufficiency patients Like metformin, this medication helps in weight loss DPP4 inhibitors (e.g. Sitagliptin or Vidagliptin) Medication to help achieve post prandial glucose control (less than 180 mg/dl) When insulin is required, you should determine if the patients creatinine is normal or compromised If creatinine is compromised, total insulin requirement should be 0.3 units/kg With intact creatinine, total insulin requirement should be 0.5 units/kg Once total insulin has been calculated, half should be given as long acting insulin (Glargine) and half as short acting insulin (eg. Lispro). Lispro should be divided into three for each meal the patient eats. If pre-prandial glucose is not at goal of 90-130 mg/dl, then long acting insulin (Glargine) needs to be increased. If post-prandial glucose is not at goal of less than 180 mg/dl, then short acting insulin (li Continue reading >>

New Type 2 Diabetes Guidelines... - Community Discussion, Information And Mnemonics For Medical Related Persons | Facebook

New Type 2 Diabetes Guidelines... - Community Discussion, Information And Mnemonics For Medical Related Persons | Facebook

The first medical treatment is the use of metformin. Metformin is a drug that has endlessly positive results and helps nearly every facet of the type 2 diabetes syndrome. It lowers blood sugar levels, it helps reduce cardiovascular risk; it may even help reduce risk for cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Many patients experience gastrointestinal side effects that limit its use. If a person cannot tolerate even 250 mg dose one should prepare an elixir of metformin with a teaspoonful having 50 mg. Start 50 mg for 2 weeks, 100 mg for the next 2 weeks. Aim at 1 gm twice daily or 500 mg twice daily. If metformin is not enough and a target of A1c 7% is not achieved according to the algorithm, you have infinite choices. You can start a sulfonylurea, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, insulin, or a thiazolidinedione. In most cases one should add an agent that does not cause weight gain -- one that hopefully will cause weight loss -- and does not cause hypoglycemia. That is the ideal agent. For those benefits, we have a DPP-4 inhibitor or a GLP-1 receptor agonist. DPP-4 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists Choose GLP1 receptor agonist if the main aim is weight loss. It is the only agent that is associated with weight loss in most people. Losing even a couple of pounds is beneficial and may motivate them to lose more weight. When it comes to maintaining weight and avoiding hypoglycemia, either the DPP-4 inhibitor or the GLP-1 receptor agonist will be effective. A DPP-4 inhibitor is a little easier because it is a pill rather than an injection, and it has very few side effects. There is more robust A1c reduction with the GLP-1 receptor agonist than with a DPP-4 inhibitor. If A1c is 8% and aim to reduce it to below 7%. Cho Continue reading >>

Mvtl - Advogados Associados

Mvtl - Advogados Associados

55 g of immediate-release metformin hydrochloride or 45 mg of pioglitazone and 2 g of extended-release metformin hydrochloride. Metformin cost cvs, how much does metformin cost without insurance at cvs Is metformin considered to be insulin, Metformin mechanism if action, Stop metformin cold turkey, Metformin and avandia generic, Metformin drug reactions to penicillin, Metformin onset and duration of benadryl, Metformin combo mnemonics, Metformin and herbal interactions with metoprolol, Metformin alcoholism, Metformin drug label definition, Ovulation with metformin, Chances of getting pregnant with glucophage metformin, Weight loss with metformin without diabetes, Coupon metformin, Metformin pdf, Buy metformin extended release online bible, Pioglitazone and metformin tablets 850, Metformin treatment polycystic ovary syndrome definition, Metformin toxicity level, Over the counter version of metformin. thanks, i was on metformin years ago when i got diagnosed with pcos but moved areas 7 years and since then no one will prescribe it. Order metformin canada, uk metformin dosage for insulin Metformin fluoxetine and wellbutrin together Glucophage 500 mg metformin hydrochloride How long to get pregnant after taking metformin while breastfeeding Can i buy metformin over the counter in canada Do you need a prescription to buy metformin without a script januvia and metformin are commonly both prescribed to a type 2 diabetes patient who is having poor results from taking just one or the other. buy actoplus metformin, metformin manufactured by zydus Free metformin er, How long does diarrhea from metformin last, How long to get pregnant after taking metformin to lose weight, Does er metformin release evenly over time, Metformin makes me sick why, Metformin pill shapes, What is metfo Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Agents Nursing Pharmacology And Study Guide

Antidiabetic Agents Nursing Pharmacology And Study Guide

The desired and beneficial action of other antidiabetic agents: Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors acarbose and miglitol inhibit alpha-glucosidase, an enzyme that breaks down glucose for absorption. Therefore, they delay the absorption of glucose . They have only a mild effect on glucose levels and do not enhance insulin secretion. They are associated with severe hepatic toxicity and GI distress. Biguanide metformin decrease the production and increases the uptake of glucose. It is effective in lowering blood glucose and does not cause hypoglycemia as the sulfonylureas do. It has been associated with development of lactic acidosis and GI distress. Meglitinides nateglinide and repaglinide are newer agents that act like sulfonylureas to increase insulin release. Synthetic human amylin pramlintide works to modulate gastric emptying after a meal to cause a feeling of fullness or satiety. It also prevents the postmeal rise in glucagon that usually elevates glucose levels. Human amylin is a hormone produced by beta cells in the pancreas that is important in regulating postmeal glucose levels. It should not be used when patient is unable to eat. Incretin mimetics exenatide and liraglutide mimic the effects of GLP-1: enhancement of glucose-dependent insulin secretion by the beta cells in the pancreas , depression of elevated glucagon secretion, and slowed gastric emptying to help moderate and lower blood glucose levels. DPP-4 inhibitors lina-, saxa-, and sitagliptin slow the breakdown of GLP-1 to prolong the effects of increased insulin secretion, decreased glucagon secretion, and slowed GI emptying. Thiazolidinediones pioglitazone and rosiglitazone decrease insulin resistance. Other antidiabetic agents are indicated for the following medical conditions: Biguanide metformin is appro Continue reading >>

Medicowesome: Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs Used For Diabetes Mellitus Mnemonic

Medicowesome: Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs Used For Diabetes Mellitus Mnemonic

Oral hypoglycemic drugs used for diabetes mellitus mnemonic So whenever there is a LOT of things to remember, like a lot of drug classes or a lot of microorganisms, I personify them. I make them real life characters and give them creep personality traits. Here's a mnemonic kinda thingy on drugs used in diabetes mellitus aka oral hypoglycemics! Biguanides:Inhibits hepatic glucogenesis and increases peripheral uptake of glucose. Metformin meets glucose and advises it to stay out of the blood. It asks the liver to keep glucose in the house (Inhibits hepatic glucose production) and asks the glucose in the bloodstream to go into adipose and skeletal muscle (Stimulates peripheral uptake of glucose). Metformin never met a glucose molecule and did not tell him to not stay in blood :P Sulfonylureas:Mimic action of glucose by closing K+ channels in pancreatic cells, which leads to depolarization and increased Ca2+ influx, releasing insulin. Sulfonylureas summon insulin. They close the potassium gates in the haunted graveyard of the pancreas and chant depolarizing spells that open calcium channel. This brings back insulin from the dead. GlyBuride is more like Ghost Bringer. Drugs ending with -gliptins (Sitagliptin, etc) are dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. They act to inhibit degradation of the endogenous incretins GLP-1 and GIP. Continue reading >>

Mnemonics | Master Of Memory: Accelerated Learning, Education, Memorization

Mnemonics | Master Of Memory: Accelerated Learning, Education, Memorization

Our brains like to remember things that are memorable. Numbers, dates, vocabulary words, and even peoples names usually arent very memorable in and of themselves. So the key to making anything easier to remember is simply to make it memorable. Seems like it should be obvious, but actually applying this consistently and systematically is a trained process. Keep reading below if you want the full intro to mnemonics. But to exploredeeper, youll want to read the whole free guide using this next article: Mnemonic Starter Guide What I WONT do is ask you to read it over and over, say the numbers out loud to yourself, and then attempt recite it a moment later. If you take that approach, chances are youll fail miserably. But check this out: $2.98 is currently a pretty good price for gas in the US (2 cents under three dollars), there are 365 days in the year, and 9 minus 5 equals 4. Much easier to remember. See, the key to remembering numbers, words, and names is to associate them with something beyond themselves. With training, anyone can eventually become exceptionally good at remembering anything with these techniques. Mnemonics are the bulk of what we talk about on Master Of Memory, because theyre really what differentiate fast learners from the typical frustrated student. If theres anything you want to learn, faster than ever, using mnemonics, then email me and Ill get right back to you: Email access to Timothy Meanwhile, well be providing more and more articles on mnemonics as time goes by. For now, check out one of the articles below, ordive deeper in thenext article: Mnemonic Startup Guide Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Review Notes Medications & Nursing Management

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Review Notes Medications & Nursing Management

Below are review notes for Diabetes Mellitus to help you study for the NCLEX exam or your nursing lecture exams. As the nurse taking care of the diabetic patient, you must know how to properly care for them, especially newly diagnosed diabetics. The nurses role include educating, assessing, planning, administering medications, and evaluating treatment. These NCLEX review notes will cover: Diet Exercise Oral Diabetic Medications Insulin Mnemonics After reviewing these notes, don’t forget to take the Diabetes NCLEX quiz. Lecture on Diabetes Mellitus for NCLEX Review Diabetes Nursing Management Nurse’s role: educating, monitoring, and administering (medications) Teach patient to follow the Triangle of Diabetes Management **Diet, medications, and exercise all work together while monitoring blood glucose Example: Patient wants to make sure their diet is balanced with their medication (insulin/oral meds) and they use exercise to manage glucose levels (doing all this while monitoring blood glucose). As the nurse you will be educating the diabetic…so for the NCLEX know education pieces like: Diet, exercising, oral medications, giving insulin (peak times), drugs that increase blood glucose and lower glucose etc. DIET: Diets are individualized due to physical activity and medication therapy (they always need tweaking)…recommend following American Diabetic Association Diet (ADA) Limitation of the following: Carbs (45-60%) grains, vegetables with starches potatoes, corn, sweets…cookies, soda, dried beans, milk) Fats (<20 %)….limit unhealthy fats saturated, trans fats, cholesterol: lard, gravies, whole milk, bologna, hot dogs, sausage, processed foods hydrogenated oils…concentrate on mono & polyunsaturated avocadoes, olives, peanuts, nuts Proteins (15-20%) meats don’ Continue reading >>

Pharm Mnemonics | Opioid | Analgesic

Pharm Mnemonics | Opioid | Analgesic

Morphine: side-effects MORPHINE: Myosis Out of it (sedation) Respiratory depression Pneumonia (aspiration) Hypotension Infrequency (constipation, urinary retention) Nausea Emesis Tricyclic antidepressants: members worth knowing "I have to hide, the CIA is after me": Clomipramine Imipramine Amitrptyline If want the next 3 worth knowing, the DNDis also after me: Desipramine Norrtriptyline Doxepin Patent ductus arteriosus: treatment "Come In and Close the door": INdomethacin is used to Close PDA SIADH-inducing drugs ABCD: Analgesics: opioids, NSAIDs Barbiturates Cyclophosphamide/ Chlorpromazine/ Carbamazepine Diuretic (thiazide) Vir-named drugs: use"-vir at start, middle or end means for virus": Drugs: Abacavir, Acyclovir, Amprenavir, Cidofovir, Denavir, Efavirenz, Indavir, Invirase, Famvir, Ganciclovir, Norvir, Oseltamivir, Penciclovir, Ritonavir, Saquinavir, Valacyclovir, Viracept, Viramune, Zanamivir, Zovirax. Phenobarbitone: side effects Children are annoying (hyperkinesia, irritability, insomnia, aggression). Adults are dosy (sedation, dizziness, drowsiness). Thrombolytic agents USA: Narcotic antagonists The Narcotic Antagonists are NAloxone and NAltrexone. Important clinically to treat narcotic overdose. Routes of entry: most rapid ways meds/toxins enter body "Stick it, Sniff it, Suck it, Soak it": Stick = Injection Sniff = inhalation Suck = ingestion Soak = absorption Anticholinergic side effects "Know the ABCD'S of anticholinergic side effects": Anorexia Blurry vision Constipation/ Confusion Dry Mouth Sedation/ Stasis of urine Atropine use: tachycardia or bradycardia "A goes with B": Atropine used clinically to treat Bradycardia. Aspirin: side effects ASPIRIN: Asthma Salicyalism Peptic ulcer disease/ Phosphorylation-oxidation uncoupling/ PPH/ Platelet disaggregati Continue reading >>

Evaluating Sig Codes And Mnemonics For Error Potential

Evaluating Sig Codes And Mnemonics For Error Potential

Evaluating sig codes and mnemonics for error potential Evaluating sig codes and mnemonics for error potential Many pharmacies use sig (or speed) codes and mnemonics to ease and accelerate the data entry process. Sig codes are programmed into the pharmacy computer system and used to represent a specific set of directions. For example, a computer system could be programmed so that the sig code 1TBID will produce Take 1 tablet by mouth twice daily on the pharmacy label. Mnemonics, on the other hand, are programmed to represent a specific drug and dosage strength combination. For example, LIP20 could be used to represent Lipitor 20 mg. While these codes can save time, they are not without risk. The following examples reported to the ISMP Medication Errors Reporting Program illustrate how processes involving sig codes can contribute to medication errors. A family practice physician in a community health center prescribed metformin 500 mg BID to a patient newly diagnosed with diabetes who was from overseas and did not speak English. When the patient returned to his physicians office a few months later, he brought his medications with him, as requested. His physician quickly noticed that metformin was missing. Instead, the patient had a prescription bottle labeled as metronidazole, with directions to take 500 mg twice a day. The prescription had been refilled several times. Luckily, the patients diabetes had remained stable, and he seemed to suffer no adverse effects from 2 months of unnecessary antimicrobial therapy. The physician notified the pharmacy and asked the pharmacist to check the original prescription, which had been written clearly and correctly for metformin. Upon further investigation, the pharmacist found that the computer entry screen for selecting these medic Continue reading >>

Pharmacology Mnemonics

Pharmacology Mnemonics

Pulmonary infiltrations inducing drugs "Go BAN Me!": A mitochondrial poison that elicits a Parkinson's-type effect. Muscarinic receptors at all parasympathetic endings sweat glands in sympathetic. Teratogenic drugs: major non-antibiotics TAP CAP: Thalidomide Androgens Progestins Corticosteroids Aspirin & indomethacin Phenytoin Necrosis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head Beta blockers with CYP2D6 polymorphic metabolism "I Met Tim Carver, the metabolic polymorph": The following beta blockers require dose adjustment due to CYP2D6 polymorphic metabolism: Metoprolol Timolol Carvedilol (in patients with lower or higher than normal CYP2D6 activity) Beta blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity Picture diabetic and asthmatic kids riding away on a cart that rolls on pinwheels. Pindolol and Carteolol have high and moderate ISA respectively, making them acceptable for use in some diabetics or asthmatics despite the fact that they are non-seletive beta blockers. Serum albumin displaced (causes newborn kernicterus and potentiation of other serum albumin-binders like warfarin) "Military General Attacked Weary Fighters Pronouncing 'Veni Vedi Veci' After Crushing Enemies": Epilepsy types: Myoclonic Grand mal Atonic West syndrome Focal Petit mal (absence) Respective drugs: Valproate Valproate Valproate ACTH Carbamazepine Ethosuximide "Topple the Queen": Quinolone interferes with Topoisomerase II. A through N: B1 selective: Acebutalol, Atenolol, Esmolol, Metoprolol. O through Z: B1, B2 non-selective: Pindolol, Propanalol, Timolol. ACE inhibitors/ AngII antagonists (sometimes Alpha agonists also) Beta blockers Narcotics: side effects "SCRAM if you see a drug dealer": Synergistic CNS depression with other drugs Sex hormone drugs: male "Feminine Males Need Testosterone": Ca++ Continue reading >>

I Learned A Great Mnemonic Earlier. Shame I Can't Remember What It Stands For

I Learned A Great Mnemonic Earlier. Shame I Can't Remember What It Stands For

I learned a great mnemonic earlier. Shame I can't remember what it stands for Reassuring news at the 10 top tips on CQC inspection session at Pulse Live : the clipboard brigade apparently dont give a huge amount of weight to my doctah never gives me nuffink feedback on NHS Choices. Really? We see negative comments with every practice, says the speaker, dismissively. So whats the point of the feedback section if those who really understand quality care know its a load of cobblers? Ah - that one remains unanswered. All the bad practices have good comments put on by their own staff, were told. I dont think thats one of the tips. Great idea, though. A quick hop across the corridor to catch a CKD update. I learn about SADMAN a great mnemonic to remember drugs to beware of in CKD. Cant remember what it stands for, though. So maybe not so great. More memorable is the fact that eight per cent of the population believe their kidneys pump blood around the body. Is that not right, then? Oh, and dont forget that CKDs fallen out of QOF. Your kidneys are still important, though. Both of them. That means plenty of fluids. Which reminds me, I need a pee and a coffee. Dr Tony Copperfield is a GP in Essex. You can follow him on Twitter @ DocCopperfield . Rate thisblog (4.29average user rating) Mmmm lets's see if I remember: Sulphonyureas, ACEI & AIIR, Diuretics, Metformin, A----- (?), NSAIDS. Had to look up the 2nd A- Aldosterone antagonists. Not bad i thought...!!! Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Alcohol ic ketoacidosis or starvation ketosis Paraldehyde, Phenformin (neither used in U.S. now) Propofol Infusion Syndrome has been proposed as a replacement in mnemonic Salicylate s (do not miss Chronic Salicylate Poisoning ) IV. Causes: Metabolic Acidosis and Normal Anion Gap (Hyperchloremia) Renal Tubular Acidosis (proximal or distal) V. Causes: Metabolic Acidosis and Elevated Osmolal Gap PaCO2 drops 1.2 mmHg per 1 meq/L bicarbonate fall Calculated PaCO2 = 1.5 x HCO3 + 8 (+/- 2) Useful in High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis Measured PaCO2 discrepancy: respiratory disorder Investigate normal Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis Elevated in normal Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis VII. Labs: Consider in Metabolic Acidosis with Increased Anion Gap Basic chemistry panel as above ( Serum Glucose , Blood Urea Nitrogen ) Rutecki (Dec 1997) Consultant, p. 3067-74 Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Metabolic Acidosis." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Search Bing for all related images Related Studies (from Trip Database) Open in New Window A condition in which the blood is too acidic. It may be caused by severe illness or sepsis (bacteria in the bloodstream). Increased acidity in the blood secondary to acid base imbalance. Causes include diabetes, kidney failure and shock. ACIDOSIS METABOLIC, metabolic acidosis, metabolic acidosis (diagnosis), Acidosis metabolic, Metabolic acidosis NOS, Metabolic Acidoses, Acidosis, Metabolic, Acidoses, Metabolic, Metabolic Acidosis, acidosis metabolic, metabolic acidosis disorder, Acidosis, Metabolic acidosis (disorder), acidosis; metabolic, metabolic; acidosis, Metabolic acidosis, NOS, M Continue reading >>

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