diabetestalk.net

Metformin Dental Side Effects

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Metformin: Uses, Action, Dosage, Side Effect And Brand Information

Metformin: Uses, Action, Dosage, Side Effect And Brand Information

What is metformin used for? Controlling blood sugar levels in adults, adolescents and children aged 10 years and over with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is used when diet alone has failed to fully control blood sugar. It may be used on its own, in combination with other oral antidiabetic medicines, or with insulin. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This is an off-licence use of metformin, so you won't find it mentioned in the information leaflets that come with the medicine. However, metformin is a widely used and established treatment option for this condition. How does metformin work? In type 2 diabetes the cells in the body, particularly muscle, fat and liver cells, become resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It makes cells in the body remove sugar from the blood. When the cells are resistant to insulin this makes blood sugar levels rise too high. Metformin hydrochloride is a type of antidiabetic medicine called a biguanide. It works in a number of ways to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Firstly, it increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. This enables these cells to remove sugar from the blood more effectively. Secondly, it reduces the amount of sugar produced by cells in the liver. Finally, it delays the absorption of sugar from the intestines into the bloodstream after eating so that there is less of a spike in blood sugar levels after meals. Metformin is taken regularly every day to help control blood sugar levels both between and directly after meals. In polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS many women have high insulin levels, and as a result their cells become resistant to the action of insulin. The high insulin levels also cause an Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin: oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects of metformin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indiges Continue reading >>

Metformin: Medicine To Treat Type 2 Diabetes - Nhs

Metformin: Medicine To Treat Type 2 Diabetes - Nhs

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes , and to help prevent type 2 diabetes if you're at high risk of developing it. Metformin is used when treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) , although it's not officially approved for PCOS. Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body does not make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes does not work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycaemia) . PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin lowers insulin and blood sugar levels, and can also stimulate ovulation. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling and being sick, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain, unlike some other diabetes medicines. Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage and Metabet. Liquid metformin is called by the brand name Riomet. Metformin is prescribed for adults, and children aged 10 years and older. Metformin is not suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past are being treated for heart failure or have recently had Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet

-an unusual or allergic reaction to metformin, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medicine with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 10 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications: -certain contrast medicines given before X-rays, CT scans, MRI, or other procedures This medicine may also interact with the following medications: -certain antiviral medicines for HIV or AIDS or for hepatitis, like adefovir, dolutegravir, emtricitabine, entecavir, lamivudine, paritaprevir, or tenofovir Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tel Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Tweet Metformin does have several common side effects. Like almost all medication, Metformin will affect different people in different ways. The following lists details Metformin side effects, but this does not mean that all people taking Metformin will experience any or all of the following side effects. To make it easier to understand the frequency of the side effects of Metformin, we have divided them by how often they occur. Very common - affecting over 1 in 10 people taking Metformin Disturbance to the gut Nausea Vomiting Diarrhoea Abdominal pain Loss of appetite Common - affecting between 1 in 10 and 1 in 100 people taking Metformin Taste disturbance, usually a metallic taste Very rare - affecting under 1 in 10,000 people taking Metformin Elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis) Decreased absorption of vitamin B12 during long-term use Skin reactions such as rash, itching or flushing To find out more about Metformin side effects, people with diabetes should discuss the medication with their doctor and read the information provided by the manufacturer. The list of side effects above does not purport to be a full list of all recognised side effects of Metformin. What should I do if I experience Metformin side effects? All medicines take some getting used to. You should speak to your doctor if any of the side effects become troublesome or painful. If you find your breathing is being affected, along with drowsiness, dizziness and confusion you should stop taking Metformin at once and seek urgent medical attention. These are the symptoms of lactic acidosis, a rare but very serious condition that can be caused by Metformin. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body Continue reading >>

Metformin Sensitive Teeth – 652053

Metformin Sensitive Teeth – 652053

This amazing site, which includes experienced business for 9 years, is one of the leading pharmacies on the Internet. We take your protection seriously. They are available 24 hours each day, 7 days per week, through email, online chat or by mobile. Privacy is vital to us. Everything we do at this amazing site is 100% legal. – Really Amazing prices – NO PRESCRIPTION REQUIRED! – Top Quality Medications! – Discount & Bonuses – Fast and Discreet Shipping Worldwide – 24/7 Customer Support. Free Consultation! – Visa, MasterCard, Amex etc. – – – – – – – – – – Metformin Sensitive Teeth Can Metformin cause Sensitive Teeth? – TreatoCan Metformin cause Sensitive Teeth? Complete analysis from patient reviews and trusted online health resources, including first-hand experiences.Will you have Sensitivity of teeth with Metformin – eHealthMeCould Metformin cause Sensitivity of teeth? We studied 199,020 Metformin users who have side effects from FDA and eHealthme. Among them, 42 have Sensitivity of teeth.sensitive teeth and Metformin | DailyStrengthI started taking Metformin about 20 days ago and have noticed an increased sensitivity in my teeth. I went to the Dentist who did a full exam and x-rays. He said..What is the link between diabetes and sensitive teeth Gum disease cause sensitive teeth. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and more severe among those with diabetes. Conversely, it appears that treaMetformin hydrochloride and Sensitivity of teeth – eHealthMeCould Metformin hydrochloride cause Sensitivity of teeth? We studied 16,881 Metformin hydrochloride users who have side effects from FDA and eHealthme.Metformin Oral – WebMDFind patient medical information for Metformin Oral on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, inte Continue reading >>

Drug Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Patients For Whom Metformin Is Contraindicated

Drug Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Patients For Whom Metformin Is Contraindicated

Go to: Metformin has long been considered the initial drug therapy choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The most widely recognized clinical guidelines and consensus recommendations endorse its use when monotherapy is initially preferred to treat hyperglycemia.1–4 However, treatment with metformin is not suitable for all patients diagnosed with T2DM. Patients may initially receive metformin but not be able to tolerate common side effects, mainly its gastrointestinal adverse effects. Likewise, some practitioners may be cautious in using metformin in patients at risk for but who do not necessarily currently have specific contraindications to its use. While the specific contraindications to use of metformin have changed to an extent over the last decade, significant renal impairment or conditions that could acutely alter renal function remain a consistent theme in delineating who should not receive the medication. Some of the common sources and specific contraindications to the use of metformin based on renal function are provided in Table 1. Inconsistencies between these sources remain. Current guidelines/consensus recommendations for specific therapies to initiate in patients who cannot tolerate or have a contraindication to metformin use provide some insight on the issue but also conflict with each other. The American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommend a sulfonylurea, meglitinide, pioglitazone, or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor when metformin cannot be used.3 They also recommend using a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist if weight loss is warranted. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists state GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are acceptable Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs

Oral Hypoglycemic Drugs

Oral hypoglycemic drugs are used only in the treatment of type 2 diabetes which is a disorder involving resistance to secreted insulin. Type 1 diabetes involves a lack of insulin and requires insulin for treatment. There are now four classes of hypoglycemic drugs: Sulfonylureas Metformin Thiazolidinediones Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These drugs are approved for use only in patients with type 2 diabetes and are used in patients who have not responded to diet, weight reduction, and exercise. They are not approved for the treatment of women who are pregnant with diabetes. SULFONYLUREAS – Sulfonylureas are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and appear to function by stimulating insulin secretion. The net effect is increased responsiveness of ß-cells (insulin secreting cells located in the pancreas) to both glucose and non-glucose secretagogues, resulting in more insulin being released at all blood glucose concentrations. Sulfonylureas may also have extra-pancreatic effects, one of which is to increase tissue sensitivity to insulin, but the clinical importance of these effects is minimal. Pharmacokinetics – Sulfonylureas differ mainly in their potency & their duration of action. Glipizide, glyburide (glibenclamide), and glimepiride are so-called second-generation sulfonylureas. They have a potency that allows them to be given in much lower doses. Those drugs with longer half-lives (particularly chlorpropamide, glyburide, and glimepiride) can be given once daily. This benefit may be counterbalanced by a substantially increased risk of hypoglycemia. Side effects – Sulfonylureas are usually well tolerated. Hypoglycemia is the most common side effect and is more common with long-acting sulfonylureas. Patients recently discharged from hospit Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Tweet Metformin does have several common side effects. Like almost all medication, Metformin will affect different people in different ways. The following lists details Metformin side effects, but this does not mean that all people taking Metformin will experience any or all of the following side effects. To make it easier to understand the frequency of the side effects of Metformin, we have divided them by how often they occur. Very common - affecting over 1 in 10 people taking Metformin Disturbance to the gut Nausea Vomiting Diarrhoea Abdominal pain Loss of appetite Common - affecting between 1 in 10 and 1 in 100 people taking Metformin Taste disturbance, usually a metallic taste Very rare - affecting under 1 in 10,000 people taking Metformin Elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis) Decreased absorption of vitamin B12 during long-term use Skin reactions such as rash, itching or flushing To find out more about Metformin side effects, people with diabetes should discuss the medication with their doctor and read the information provided by the manufacturer. The list of side effects above does not purport to be a full list of all recognised side effects of Metformin. What should I do if I experience Metformin side effects? All medicines take some getting used to. You should speak to your doctor if any of the side effects become troublesome or painful. If you find your breathing is being affected, along with drowsiness, dizziness and confusion you should stop taking Metformin at once and seek urgent medical attention. These are the symptoms of lactic acidosis, a rare but very serious condition that can be caused by Metformin. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Metformin: Oral Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin: Oral Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin (brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumteza, Glucophage XR, Riomet) is an oral medication used alone or with other medications to treat type 2 diabetes. It was FDA approved in 1994 and is also available as the combination drug rosiglitazone/metformin (Avandamet). Metformin helps lower blood sugar in three ways: It lowers the amount of glucose absorbed from food. It lowers the amount of glucose produced by the liver. It increases the bodys response to insulin. Metformin does not directly lower blood sugar as insulin does. Therefore, it is not appropriate for patients with type 1 diabetes who do not produce any insulin. People with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, kidney disease , or kidney failure should not use it. Neither should children under the age of 10. Children under the age of 17 should not use the extended-release preparation of metformin. Metformin is typically taken twice a day, preferably with food. If a dose is missed, the missed pill should be taken as soon as possible, unless it is almost time for the next dose. Doubling up on medication in order to make up a missed dose should not be done. Metformin commonly causes diarrhea if taken without food. Other side effects include stomach upset, gas and bloating, metallic taste, headache, cough, and muscle pain. If metformin is inadequate for blood sugar control, patients taking metformin can also experience high blood sugar , with symptoms of confusion, seizures, dry mouth, vomiting, sweet-smelling breath, or loss of consciousness. Anyone experiencing any of these symptomsor chest pain, a rash, or other worrisome symptomsneeds to seek immediate medical attention. Rarely, metformin can cause lactic acidosis, a serious condition characterized by a buildup of lactic acid in the blood. Lactic acidosi Continue reading >>

Metformin | Cigna

Metformin | Cigna

What is the most important information I should know about metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but metformin is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin? You should not use metformin if you are allergic to it, or if you have: metabolic or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. To make sure metformin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (your kidney function may need to be checked before you take this medicine); high ketone levels in your blood or urine; if you also use insulin, or other oral diabetes medications. Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be Continue reading >>

More in ketosis