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Metformin Cause Ketoacidosis

Sglt2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: Fda

Sglt2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: Fda

SGLT2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: FDA The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned today that sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors used to treat type 2 diabetes may lead to ketoacidosis requiring hospitalization. The warning includes the SGLT2 inhibitors canagliflozin (Invokana, Johnson & Johnson), dapagliflozin (Farxiga, AstraZeneca), and empagliflozin (Jardiance, Lilly/Boehringer), as well as three combination products that include an SGLT2 inhibitor: canagliflozin plus metformin (Invokamet, Johnson & Johnson), dapagliflozin plus metformin extended release (Xigduo XR, AstraZeneca), and empagliflozin plus linagliptin (Glyxambi, Lilly/Boehringer). A search of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database identified 20 cases of acidosis reported as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), ketoacidosis, or ketosis in patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors from March 2013 to June 6, 2014, the FDA said . Ketoacidosis is not typically observed in patients with type 2 diabetes, the FDA notes, and the DKA case presentations were "atypical in that glucose levels were only mildly elevated at less than 200 mg/dL in some reports, while patients with type 1 diabetes who have DKA typically have glucose levels greater than 250 mg/dL." Signs of ketoacidosis include difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue and sleepiness. "Healthcare professionals should evaluate for the presence of acidosis, including ketoacidosis, in patients experiencing these signs or symptoms; discontinue SGLT2 inhibitors if acidosis is confirmed; and take appropriate measures to correct the acidosis and monitor sugar levels," the FDA advises. In Half of Cases, No Triggering Factor for DKA In all cases, a diagnosis of DKA or ketoacidosis wa Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Rapid, deep breathing. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. Confusion. Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some test strips nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high. When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through your vein and closely watching certain chemicals in your blood (electrolyt Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Metformin And Diabetic Ketoacidosis - From Fda Reports

Metformin And Diabetic Ketoacidosis - From Fda Reports

Diabetic ketoacidosis is found among people who take Metformin, especially for people who are female, 60+ old , have been taking the drug for 1 - 6 months, also take medication Invokana, and have High blood pressure. This review analyzes which people have Diabetic ketoacidosis with Metformin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 199,020 people who have side effects when taking Metformin from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Metformin and have Diabetic ketoacidosis, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Metformin and have Diabetic ketoacidosis Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Number of reports submitted per year: < 1 month: 22.58 % 1 - 6 months: 24.73 % 6 - 12 months: 9.68 % 1 - 2 years: 8.6 % 2 - 5 years: 20.43 % 5 - 10 years: 7.53 % 10+ years: 6.45 % Gender of people who have Diabetic ketoacidosis when taking Metformin *: female: 55.85 % male: 44.15 % Age of people who have Diabetic ketoacidosis when taking Metformin *: 0-1: 0.0 % 2-9: 0.0 % 10-19: 0.63 % 20-29: 5.07 % 30-39: 12.68 % 40-49: 21.85 % 50-59: 26.92 % 60+: 32.84 % Top conditions involved for these people *: High Blood Pressure (133 people, 7.77%) Depression (70 people, 4.09%) Type 1 Diabetes (67 people, 3.91%) High Blood Cholesterol (57 people, 3.33%) Stress And Anxiety (41 people, 2.39%) Top co-used drugs for these people *: Invokana (411 people, 24.01%) Lantus (233 people, 13.61%) Jardiance (147 people, 8.59%) Insulin (136 people, 7.94%) Seroquel (110 people, 6.43%) Top other side effects for these people Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis: A Diabetes Complication

Ketoacidosis: A Diabetes Complication

Ketoacidosis can affect both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes patients. It's a possible short-term complication of diabetes, one caused by hyperglycemia—and one that can be avoided. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are two of the most serious complications of diabetes. These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of mortality among persons with diabetes in spite of all of the advances in understanding diabetes. The annual incidence rate of DKA estimated from population-based studies ranges from 4.8 to 8 episodes per 1,000 patients with diabetes. Unfortunately, in the US, incidents of hospitalization due to DKA have increased. Currently, 4% to 9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes include DKA. The incidence of HHS is more difficult to determine because of lack of population studies but it is still high at around 15%. The prognosis of both conditions is substantially worsened at the extremes of age, and in the presence of coma and hypertension. Why and How Does Ketoacidosis Occur? The pathogenesis of DKA is more understood than HHS but both relate to the basic underlying reduction in the net effective action of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counter regulatory hormones such as glucagons, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone. These hormonal alterations in both DKA and HHS lead to increased hepatic and renal glucose production and impaired use of glucose in peripheral tissues, which results in hyperglycemia and parallel changes in osmolality in extracellular space. This same combination also leads to release of free fatty acids into the circulation from adipose tissue and to unrestrained hepatic fatty acid oxidation to ketone bodies. Some drugs ca Continue reading >>

Combined Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis And Euglycemic Ketoacidosis

Combined Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis And Euglycemic Ketoacidosis

Combined metformin-associated lactic acidosis and euglycemic ketoacidosis 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz15, 8036 Graz, Austria 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz15, 8036 Graz, Austria 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz15, 8036 Graz, Austria 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz15, 8036 Graz, Austria 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz15, 8036 Graz, Austria 2Department of Internal Medicine, Intensive Care Unit, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria 3Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz, Austria 4Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Graz, Austria Julia K. Mader, Phone: +43-316-38580254, Fax: +43-316-38517527, Email: [email protected] . Received 2016 Apr 26; Accepted 2017 Aug 4. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. In renal failure metformin can lead to lactic acidosis. Additional inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by accumulation of the drug may aggravate fasting-induced ketoacidosis. We report the occurrence of metformin-associated lactic acido Continue reading >>

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

NASHVILLE -- Three type 2 diabetes drugs -- canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance) -- may lead to ketoacidosis, the FDA warned today. The sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are designed to lower blood sugar in patients with diabetes, but the FDA is investigating a connection between the drugs and dangerously high acid levels in the blood. They are also looking at whether changes will need to be made to the prescribing information, they said in the warning, which is posted online. At least two studies presented here at the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists have found a connection between the SGLT2 inhibitors and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). "Healthcare professionals should evaluate for the presence of acidosis, including ketoacidosis, in patients experiencing these signs or symptoms," the FDA said. "Discontinue SGLT2 inhibitors if acidosis is confirmed, and take appropriate measures to correct the acidosis and monitor sugar levels." The signs and symptoms listed included difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue or sleepiness. The FDA is issuing the warning after they searched their database of adverse event complaints, they said in an announcement. From March 2013 to June 2014 there were 20 cases of DKA reported, most of them with type 2 diabetes as the indication. Hospitalization was required in all of the cases, and the median time to onset was 2 weeks after starting the drug. "I would encourage that these cases be studied so we can learn the scenarios behind them so they can be broadcast," said Farhad Zangeneh, MD, medical director of Endocrine, Diabetes and Osteoporosis Clinic, in an interview with MedPage Today. "The important Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What's Behind The Fda Warning

Sglt2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What's Behind The Fda Warning

With commentary by Yehuda Handelsman, MD, FACP, FACE, FNLA, an endocrinologist in private practice in Tarzana, CA, Medical Director and Principal Investigator of the Metabolic Institute of America and President of the American College of Endocrinology People with diabetes who take blood sugar-lowering drugs called SGLT2 inhibitors were recently warned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that they should watch for signs of a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. canagliflozin (Invokana) dapagliflozin (Farxiga) empagliflozin (Jardiance) as well as the combination pills: canagliflozin plus metformin (Invokamet) dapagliflozin plus metformin extended-release (Xigduo XR) empagliflozin plus linagliptin (Glyxambi). “Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can be deadly,” says Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE, an advanced practice dietitian at the University of Chicago Kovler Diabetes Center and a member of EndocrineWeb’s advisory board. “DKA is usually more of a concern for people with type 1 diabetes, but this warning is for people with type 2 diabetes who are taking the SGLT2 inhibitors, as well as people with type 1 diabetes who take these medications off label. DKA — dangerously high acid levels in the bloodstream — happens when your body breaks down fat instead of glucose for energy, releasing acidic compounds called ketones. Early symptoms include thirst, frequent urination and sweet, fruity breath, Hess-Fischl says. You may feel tired and confused, and develop nausea, stomach pain, vomiting and difficulty breathing. “If you notice symptoms, call your doctor immediately. But if you’re vomiting, can’t catch your breath or are concerned, go to the emergency room,” she says. Putting the Risk in Perspective The FDA warning, relea Continue reading >>

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Synjardy Or Synjardy Xr?

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Synjardy Or Synjardy Xr?

SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are prescription medicines that contain 2 diabetes medicines, empagliflozin (JARDIANCE) and metformin. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR can be used along with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes, and can be used in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known cardiovascular disease when both empagliflozin and metformin are appropriate and empagliflozin is needed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are not for people with type 1 diabetes, or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR can cause serious side effects, including Lactic Acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the blood). Metformin, one of the medicines in SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR, can cause lactic acidosis, a rare but serious condition that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis: cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. You have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR if you: have moderate to severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in the short term (“binge” drinking); get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids); have surgery; have a heart attack, severe infection, or stroke. Who should not take SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR? Do not take SYNJARDY or SYNJA Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crises

Hyperglycemic Crises

What They Are and How to Avoid Them One type results in about 100,000 hospitalizations a year with a mortality rate of under 5%. The other is thought to cause fewer hospitalizations, yet the mortality rate is about 15%. Severe hyperglycemic conditions, known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), involve very serious imbalances in blood chemistry and usually require that a person be hospitalized until normal blood chemistry is restored. Because they can occur in anyone with diabetes, everyone should know what causes them, how to prevent them, how they are treated, and when to seek medical attention. The body in balance Glucose metabolism is a complex balancing act. In people who don’t have diabetes, a number of interconnected processes help the body to use glucose and keep blood glucose levels in the normal range. The body constantly balances glucose extracted from foods and produced by the liver with glucose utilization by the body’s tissues. When there is ample glucose in the bloodstream, the liver converts some of it into glycogen for storage. When the body needs more energy, such as during a prolonged period of fasting or activity, the liver converts stored glycogen back into glucose so that it can be used by the body’s tissues. The liver also can create glucose from amino acids and fats. Insulin lowers blood glucose levels both by slowing down the liver’s glucose production and by helping the body’s tissues to use glucose for energy. If the blood glucose level goes too low, other hormones, called counterregulatory hormones, work against the action of insulin to raise blood glucose levels. These hormones include glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol. All work by prodding the liver to release glucose and by Continue reading >>

Normoglycemia Remission In Dka Prolonged With Metformin, Sitagliptin

Normoglycemia Remission In Dka Prolonged With Metformin, Sitagliptin

Normoglycemia Remission in DKA Prolonged With Metformin, Sitagliptin Normoglycemia Remission in DKA Prolonged With Metformin, Sitagliptin Sitagliptin and metformin prolonged near-normoglycemia remission in diabetic ketoacidosis. HealthDay News -- For patients with new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and severe hyperglycemia, metformin and sitagliptin treatment after normoglycemia remission correlate with increased relapse-free survival and prolonged remission, according to a study published online in Diabetes Care. Priyathama Vellanki, MD, from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a prospective 4-year study involving 48 African American participants with DKA and severe hyperglycemia. Participants were randomly assigned to metformin (17 participants), sitagliptin (16 participants), or placebo (15 participants) after normoglycemia remission. Oral glucose tolerance tests were conducted at randomization, at 3 months, and every 6 months for a median of 331 days. The researchers found that the metformin and sitagliptin groups had significantly higher relapse-free survival compared with placebo (P=.015), and significantly prolonged mean time to relapse (480 vs 305 days; P=.004). Compared with placebo, the probability of relapse was significantly lower for metformin and sitagliptin (hazard ratios, 0.28 and 0.31, respectively). Compared with those with hyperglycemia relapse, individuals who remained in remission had a higher disposition index and incremental area under the curve for insulin, with no significant changes in insulin sensitivity. "This study shows that near-normoglycemia remission was similarly prolonged by treatment with sitagliptin and metformin," the researchers wrote. "The prolongation of remission was due to improvemen Continue reading >>

Xigduo Lawsuit - Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Xigduo Lawsuit - Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Drug Dangers Defective Drugs Type 2 Diabetes Drugs: SGLT2 Inhibitors Xigduo Xigduo Lawsuit Antidiabetic medications are responsible for harming thousands of people each year in the U.S. A person injured by these medications may face costly medical treatments, permanent disability and the need for long term care. Thousands of lawsuits have been filed in the recent past by patients and family members of patients who have been harmed by antidiabetic medications. Some of these lawsuits have resulted in settlement awards reaching into the hundreds of thousands of dollars for injury or death caused by antidiabetic drugs. Reasons for filing antidiabetic medication lawsuits have included: Company manufactured a defective or dangerous drug Company failed to adequately warn about dangers of drug Company deliberately concealed knowledge of drug risk Though thousands of lawsuits are filed after injury that is suspected to be caused by diabetic medications, a lawsuit is no guarantee of settlement. Many victims have been awarded financial compensation but each case must be considered individually for its merits. If you or a loved one have been injured by XigDuo XR (dapagliflozin and metformin), you may be eligible for compensation. XigDuo XR is a combination drug with the active ingredients dapagliflozin and metformin. These individual ingredients can also be found in the brand name medications Farxiga and Glucophage. The FDA has issued a warning regarding XigDuo XR and other SGLT2 inhibitor use. The May 2015 announcement warned of the possibility of patients who had used SGLT2 inhibitors such as Farxiga and XigDuo XR developing diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The warning was announced after the agency had received at least 20 serious adverse events regarding D Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition when the body has practically no insulin. This insulin deficiency results in extremely high blood sugar levels. Consequently, the muscle, fat and liver cells cannot use glucose for fuel. These cells are converted into glucose by hormones such as glucagon and adrenalin and turned into ketones through oxidation. As a result, the body uses fat for fuel. The increased levels of blood sugar are not flushed through urination. DKA is usually noticed in patients suffering from Insulin-dependent diabetes. A person can suffer from diabetic ketoacidosis if there has been severe dehydration and consequently the blood chemistry has been affected. There is accumulation of organic acids and ketones in the blood. Elevated ketone levels in the body upset its blood pH and make the blood acidic thereby triggering a toxic condition for the body's cells. Diabetic ketoacidosis is noticed when hyperglycemia exceeds 300 mg/dL. If diabetes ketoacidosis is not addressed in time, it can lead to coma and death. Surgery, infection, trauma, stroke or heart attack can also trigger diabetes ketoacidosis. Insufficient fluid intake, pancreatitis and alcohol abuse can trigger diabetes ketoacidosis. Symptoms of diabetes ketoacidosis include excessive thirst and general weakness. There is frequent urination, loss of appetite and vomiting. Other symptoms of diabetes ketoacidosis are weight loss and abdominal pain. A person suffering from DKA tends to experience low blood pressure and increased heart rate. High ketone levels can give rise to a fruity-scent on the breath and vomiting. The patient will be restless and agitated. The skin will be hot and dry and appear flushed. Patients suffering from diabetes must check their blood glucose levels if th Continue reading >>

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