diabetestalk.net

Metformin And Dka

Ketoacidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes – Flatbush Diabetes

Ketoacidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes – Flatbush Diabetes

There is increasing recognition of a group of patients with type 2 diabetes who can present with ketoacidosis. Most reports have been of patients of African descent; however, the condition has been reported in other groups. This is a case of a Caucasian patient who has had three presentations with ketoacidosis and whose diabetes is not usually insulin-dependent. A patient, aged 48 years, presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in a semi-comatose condition. She had a 3-day history of vomiting and loss of appetite. In the previous weeks she had undergone radiotherapy for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (skin primary). The patient had two similar episodes of DKA, one 20 months and another 3 months earlier. Two of the patient’s brothers had type 2 diabetes. The patient was not abusing alcohol and did not have a history of pancreatitis. Three years prior to this admission the patient had been diagnosed elsewhere with type 2 diabetes, for which she had been on metformin and a small dose of insulin glargine. Two months after stopping her insulin glargine she developed her first episode of DKA while visiting our town. DKA, was diagnosed on the basis of arterial pH 7.03, blood glucose level 25.9 mmol/L, bicarbonate level of 5 mmol/L and positive urinary ketones. It was felt that infected skin lesions may have precipitated the DKA. Eleven days later, she was discharged on metformin 250 mg twice daily and a falling dose of insulin glargine (26 units a day). She was then lost to follow-up in our centre, but apparently soon after did not require insulin and maintained adequate gylcaemic control for 18 months until just prior to her next admission solely on metformin 1 g twice daily. The next admission for DKA occurred while living in a city. She was discharged on insulin but Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Challenging Diabetes Phenotype

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Challenging Diabetes Phenotype

HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland Summary We describe three patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to ketosis prone type 2, rather than type 1 diabetes. All patients were treated according to a standard DKA protocol, but were subsequently able to come off insulin therapy while maintaining good glycaemic control. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) presenting with DKA has not been described previously in Irish patients. The absence of islet autoimmunity and evidence of endogenous beta cell function after resolution of DKA are well-established markers of KPD, but are not readily available in the acute setting. Although not emphasised in any current guidelines, we have found that a strong family history of type 2 diabetes and the presence of cutaneous markers of insulin resistance are strongly suggestive of KPD. These could be emphasised in future clinical practice guidelines. Learning points: Even in white patients, DKA is not synonymous with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune beta cell failure. KPD needs to be considered in all patients presenting with DKA, even though it will not influence their initial treatment. Aside from markers of endogenous beta cell function and islet autoimmunity, which in any case are unlikely to be immediately available to clinicians, consideration of family history of type 2 diabetes and cutaneous markers of insulin resistance might help to identify those with KPD and are more readily apparent in the acute setting, though not emphasised in guidelines. Consideration of KPD should never alter the management of the acute severe metabolic derangement of DKA, and phasing out of insulin therapy requires frequent attendance and meticulous and cautious surveillanc Continue reading >>

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin is not usually prescribed for Type 1 diabetes, but over the past couple years, inspired in part by Mike’s experience on it (see here, here, here and here), I’ve become interested in trying it. Not only has it been in widespread use as a treatment for Type 2 diabetes since its approval in 1994, but it’s currently being investigated for potential cognitive and anti-cancer benefits as well. As Mike has asked, “Could metformin be the new aspirin?” The typical explanation for why metformin is not prescribed to people with Type 1 diabetes is that metformin increases your insulin sensitivity — and given that, by definition, people with Type 1 don’t make any insulin, it won’t help them. But I see two obvious holes in that logic. First, people with Type 1 diabetes do have insulin in their bodies; it’s just administered in a different way (i.e. injected subcutaneously, rather than secreted by the pancreas). And as anyone who’s struggled with the dawn phenomenon knows, people with Type 1 diabetes experience insulin resistance, too. And second, metformin does more than just affect insulin sensitivity. It also appears to regulate the genes responsible for causing the liver to release glucose into your blood. As you may know, your pancreas and your liver work closely together to maintain a proper level of glucose in the blood. When you’ve got a lot of glucose in your blood, your pancreas secretes insulin to remove it (provided you don’t have Type 1 diabetes!). And when you don’t have sufficient external glucose – like when you’re sleeping — your liver releases some stored glucose so that your blood sugar does not drop too low. To put this a different way, insulin is what keeps a non-diabetic person’s blood glucose from getting too high; the Continue reading >>

Randomized Controlled Study Of Metformin And Sitagliptin On Long-term Normoglycemia Remission In African American Patients With Hyperglycemic Crises

Randomized Controlled Study Of Metformin And Sitagliptin On Long-term Normoglycemia Remission In African American Patients With Hyperglycemic Crises

Go to: Abstract After intensive insulin treatment, many obese African American patients with new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and severe hyperglycemia are able to achieve near-normoglycemia remission. The optimal treatment to prevent hyperglycemic relapses after remission is not known. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective, 4-year, placebo-controlled study randomly assigned 48 African American subjects with DKA and severe hyperglycemia to metformin 1,000 mg daily (n = 17), sitagliptin 100 mg daily (n = 16), or placebo (n = 15) after normoglycemia remission. Hyperglycemic relapse was defined as fasting glucose >130 mg/dL (7.2 mmol/L) and HbA1c >7.0% (53 mmol/mol). Oral glucose tolerance tests were conducted at randomization and at 3 months and then every 6 months for a median of 331 days. Oral minimal model and incremental area under the curve for insulin (AUCi) were used to calculate insulin sensitivity (Si) and β-cell function, respectively. Disposition index (DI) was calculated as a product of Si and incremental AUCi. Relapse-free survival was higher in sitagliptin and metformin (P = 0.015) compared with placebo, and mean time to relapse was significantly prolonged in the metformin and sitagliptin groups compared with the placebo group (480 vs. 305 days, P = 0.004). The probability of relapse was significantly lower for metformin (hazard ratio 0.28 [95% CI 0.10–0.81]) and sitagliptin (0.31 [0.10–0.98]) than for placebo. Subjects who remained in remission had a higher DI (P = 0.02) and incremental AUCi (P < 0.001) than those with hyperglycemia relapse without significant changes in Si. This study shows that near-normoglycemia remission was similarly prolonged by treatment with sitagliptin and metformin. The prolongation of remission was due to improvem Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Drugs May Bring On Ketoacidosis

New Diabetes Drugs May Bring On Ketoacidosis

SGLT2 inhibitors, which are some of the newest diabetes drugs on the market, may increase the risk of a serious condition. A new study concludes that these medications actually double the likelihood of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Because diabetes is becoming more prevalent in the United States, the hunt for new and more effective medication is in full flow. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are the most recent additions to the list of available medicines. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce blood glucose levels by encouraging the kidneys to increase sugar excretion in urine. These drugs are often given in combination with other diabetes medications, such as metformin and insulin. The new class of drugs has become relatively popular, but the latest research finds that they could increase the risk of a serious diabetes-related complication. Rare but dangerous Diabetic ketoacidosis is relatively uncommon but potentially life-threatening. It occurs when acids called ketones build up in the body, increasing the acidity of the blood, or when the body does not produce enough insulin. When insulin is absent, glucose cannot enter cells and provide them with the energy they need. Therefore, the body falls back on its secondary fuel source: fat. Ketones are byproducts of burning fat. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include increased thirst, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, and confusion. It can also cause swelling in the brain, and, if left unchecked, can be fatal. Although diabetic ketoacidosis is more likely to occur in people with type 1 diabetes, it does occasionally appear in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Examining the interaction The new study, carried out by Dr. Michael Fralick and a team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, set out to examine Continue reading >>

Pioglitazone/metformin

Pioglitazone/metformin

Pioglitazone/metformin (also known by the brand names Actoplus Met, Piomet and Politor) is combination of two oral diabetes medications pioglitazone and metformin. The two oral antihyperglycemic agents with different mechanisms of action are used to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Mechanisms[edit] Pioglitazone is a member of the thiazolidinedione class, it decreases insulin resistance in the periphery and in the liver resulting in increased insulin dependent glucose disposal and decreased hepatic glucose output. Metformin is a member of the biguanide class, improves glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes, lowering both basal and postprandial plasma glucose. Metformin decreases hepatic glucose production, decreases intestinal absorption of glucose and improves insulin sensitivity by increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization. Indication[edit] Pioglitazone/metformin is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise: To improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, or For patients who are already treated with a separate combination of pioglitazone and metformin, For patients whose diabetes is not adequately controlled with metformin alone, or For patients who have initially responded to pioglitazone alone and require additional glycemic control. Dosage and administration[edit] Recommended dose[edit] Use of antihyperglycemic agents in the management of type 2 diabetes should be individualized on the basis of effectiveness and tolerability. Pioglitazone/metformin should be given with meals; the initial starting dose is either the 15 mg/500 mg or 15 mg/850 mg tablet strength once or twice daily, and gradually titrated after assessing adequacy of therapeutic response, while not exceeding the maximum recommend Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors Side Effects

Sglt2 Inhibitors Side Effects

Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are intended to treat Type 2 diabetes along with diet and exercise. They have also been prescribed for off-label, or unapproved, uses including weight loss. The active ingredients in the drugs are different gliflozin compounds. SGLT2 inhibitors approved for use in the U.S. include: In addition, some medications combine SGLT2 inhibitors with other diabetes drugs. These include: Metformin decreases glucose production in the liver while increasing the body’s ability to absorb glucose. It is often used in conjunction with insulin as well as SGLT2 inhibitors to treat Type 2 diabetes. It carries additional risks of side effects. Linagliptin works by regulating insulin levels after meals. When first approved, SGLT2 inhibitors took a revolutionary approach to controlling blood sugar in diabetic patients. The drugs cause the body to direct excess glucose to the kidneys. From there, it is expelled through a patient’s urine. SGLT2 Inhibitor Side Effects Range from Minor to Life-Threatening While the way SGLT2 drugs work is unique, this can also lead to unique side effects. For example, because the drugs cause excess sugar to escape the body in urine, it can also lead to yeast infections and urinary tract infections. The drugs primarily work in the kidneys, so these drugs are not for people with weak kidney function. Some studies also show these drugs may lead to dangerous kidney infections and kidney failure. Side effects can lead from simple annoyances such as dry mouth to more serious complications including kidney injuries. Common SGLT2 Inhibitor Side Effect Symptoms: Abdominal pain Back pain Constipation Dry mouth Fatigue Increased cholesterol Increased urination Influenza Male and female yeast infections Nausea Thirst Urin Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors: Updated Advice On The Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sglt2 Inhibitors: Updated Advice On The Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Advice for healthcare professionals: When treating patients who are taking a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, or empagliflozin): inform them of the signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – see below – and advise them to seek immediate medical advice if they develop any of these discuss the risk factors for DKA with patients (see below) discontinue treatment with the SGLT2 inhibitor immediately if DKA is suspected or diagnosed do not restart treatment with any SGLT2 inhibitor in patients who experienced DKA during use, unless another cause for DKA was identified and resolved interrupt treatment with the SGLT2 inhibitor in patients who are hospitalised for major surgery or acute serious illnesses; treatment may be restarted once the patient’s condition has stabilised Reports of diabetic acidosis EU medicines regulators have completed a review of DKA associated with SGLT2 inhibitor treatment; this article summarises the review’s recommendations. We published preliminary advice on this in June 2015. SGLT2 inhibitors are licensed for use in adults with type 2 diabetes to improve glycaemic control. Serious, life-threatening, and fatal cases of DKA have been reported in patients taking an SGLT2 inhibitor (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, or empagliflozin). The EU review concluded that this side effect is rare (affecting between 1 in 1000 and 1 in 10,000 patients). Up to 26 February 2016, we had received 118 Yellow Card reports of DKA and associated reactions in patients taking an SGLT2 inhibitor in the UK. In several cases, blood glucose levels were only moderately elevated (eg <14mmol/L)—representing an atypical presentation for DKA, which could delay diagnosis and treatment. Therefore inform patients of the si Continue reading >>

Let’s Get To Know Synjardy

Let’s Get To Know Synjardy

SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are prescription medicines that contain 2 diabetes medicines, empagliflozin (JARDIANCE) and metformin. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR can be used along with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes, and can be used in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known cardiovascular disease when both empagliflozin and metformin are appropriate and empagliflozin is needed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are not for people with type 1 diabetes, or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR? SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR can cause serious side effects, including Lactic Acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the blood). Metformin, one of the medicines in SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR, can cause lactic acidosis, a rare but serious condition that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis: cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. You have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR if you: have moderate to severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in the short term (“binge” drinking); get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids); have surgery; have a heart attack, severe infection, o Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

When we're stressed, our bodies need extra energy to help us cope and recover. This is true whether bodies are under stress from illness or injury or are dealing with the effects of emotional stress, both good and bad. To meet the demand for more energy, the body responds by releasing into the bloodstream sugar that's been stored in the liver, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In someone without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the rise in blood sugar by releasing enough insulin into the bloodstream to help convert the sugar into energy. This brings blood sugar levels back down to normal. In someone with diabetes, the extra demand usually means needing to take more diabetes medicine (insulin or pills.) To make sure your body is getting enough medicine to help keep your blood sugar levels close to normal, you'll need to test more often when you are: Sick Recovering from surgery Fighting an infection Feeling upset Under more stress than usual Traveling Type 1 Diabetes In people with type 1 diabetes, blood sugar levels rise in response to stress, but the body doesn't have enough insulin to turn the sugar into energy. Instead, the body burns stored fat to meet energy needs. When fat is burned for energy, it creates waste products called ketones. As fat is broken down, ketones start to build up in the bloodstream. High levels of ketones in the blood can lead to a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can cause a person to lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma. Type 2 Diabetes In people with type 2 diabetes, the body usually has enough insulin available to turn sugar into energy, so it doesn't need to burn fat. However, stress hormones can cause blood sugar levels to rise to very high and even dangerous levels. People with type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute complication of diabetes that occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and a characteristic fruity odor on the breath. Diabetic ketoacidosis is diagnosed by blood tests that show high levels of glucose, ketones, and acid. Treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis involves intravenous fluid replacement and insulin. Without treatment, diabetic ketoacidosis can progress to coma and death. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In both types, the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood is elevated. Glucose is one of the body's main fuels. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. helps glucose move from the blood into the cells. Once glucose is inside the cells, it is either converted to energy or stored as fat or glycogen until it is needed. When there is not enough insulin, most cells cannot use the glucose that is in the blood. Because cells still need energy to survive, they switch to a back-up mechanism to obtain energy. Fat cells begin breaking down, producing compounds called ketones. Ketones provide some energy to cells but also make the blood too acidic (ketoacidosis). Ketoacidosis that occurs in people with diabetes is called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs mainly in people who have type 1 diabetes because their body produces little or no insulin. However, rarely, some people with type 2 diabetes develop ketoacidosis. People who abuse alcohol also can develop ketoacidosis (alcoholic ketoacidosis). Causes Diabetic ketoacidosis is sometimes the first sign that people (usually children—see also Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)) have developed diabetes. In people who know they have diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis can occur f Continue reading >>

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

NASHVILLE -- Three type 2 diabetes drugs -- canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance) -- may lead to ketoacidosis, the FDA warned today. The sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are designed to lower blood sugar in patients with diabetes, but the FDA is investigating a connection between the drugs and dangerously high acid levels in the blood. They are also looking at whether changes will need to be made to the prescribing information, they said in the warning, which is posted online. At least two studies presented here at the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists have found a connection between the SGLT2 inhibitors and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). "Healthcare professionals should evaluate for the presence of acidosis, including ketoacidosis, in patients experiencing these signs or symptoms," the FDA said. "Discontinue SGLT2 inhibitors if acidosis is confirmed, and take appropriate measures to correct the acidosis and monitor sugar levels." The signs and symptoms listed included difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue or sleepiness. The FDA is issuing the warning after they searched their database of adverse event complaints, they said in an announcement. From March 2013 to June 2014 there were 20 cases of DKA reported, most of them with type 2 diabetes as the indication. Hospitalization was required in all of the cases, and the median time to onset was 2 weeks after starting the drug. "I would encourage that these cases be studied so we can learn the scenarios behind them so they can be broadcast," said Farhad Zangeneh, MD, medical director of Endocrine, Diabetes and Osteoporosis Clinic, in an interview with MedPage Today. "The important Continue reading >>

Jardiance, Invokana, And Farxiga Double Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Jardiance, Invokana, And Farxiga Double Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The June 8, 2017 edition of The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has a “To the Editor” letter, titled “Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis after Initiation of an SGLT2 Inhibitor”, which is likely causing some concerns among doctors and type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. It is about the safety of Jardiance, Invokana, Farxiga, and other diabetes medicines in the SGLT2 inhibitor class of diabetes drugs. A June 7, 2017 MedPage Today article, “Study Warns of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With SGLT2 Inhibitors in T2D”, provides a summary and some commentary about the recent medical study which is described in this June 2017 NEJM letter to the editor: The newest class of drugs for treating type 2 diabetes carries a greater risk for diabetic ketoacidosis compared to other classes of drugs, a new study suggests. Newly initiated use of an SGLT2 inhibitor was associated with a roughly twofold greater risk of diabetic ketoacidosis versus new initiation of a DPP4 inhibitor (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.6), according to Michael Fralick, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and colleagues…. It is important to know that if diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is not treated, it can lead to severe illness or death. In more detail, possible complications of DKA include these medical conditions: Cerebral Edema (fluid buildup in the brain) Bowel Necrosis (death of bowel tissue due to low blood pressure) All of these newer diabetes medicines are part of the Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors class of drugs: Invokana (canagliflozin) Invokamet (canagliflozin and metformin) Invokamet XR (canagliflozin and metformin extended-release) Farxiga (dapagliflozin) Xigduo XR (dapagliflozin and metformin extended-release) Qtern (dapagliflozin and saxagliptin) Jardiance (empagliflozin) Glyxambi (e Continue reading >>

Acid-base And Electrolyte Disorders Associated With The Use Of Antidiabetic Drugs

Acid-base And Electrolyte Disorders Associated With The Use Of Antidiabetic Drugs

Introduction: The use of antidiabetic drugs is expected to substantially increase since diabetes mellitus incidence rises. Currently used antidiabetic drugs have a positive safety profile, but they are associated with certain acid-base and electrolyte abnormalities. The aim of the review is to present the current data regarding the antidiabetic drugs-associated acid-base and electrolyte abnormalities. Areas covered: Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have been linked with the scarce, but serious, complication of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis, as well as with an increase in serum potassium, magnesium and phosphorus levels. Metformin use has been associated with the development of lactic acidosis, although many studies have doubt the direct link with this serious complication. Additionally, metformin in some studies has been linked with a decrease in serum magnesium levels. Insulin administration is associated with a reduction in serum potassium, magnesium and phosphorus concentration, along with reduced renal magnesium excretion. Pioglitazone is associated with an increase in serum magnesium levels. Current data regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms, precipitants, risk factors and presentation of the above abnormalities are discussed in the present review. Expert opinion: Clinicians should choose appropriately between antidiabetic drugs based not only on their hypoglycemic efficacy and effects on cardiovascular risk but also based on the patient’s specific risk to develop acid-base or electrolyte derangements. Continue reading >>

More in ketosis