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Metformin And Dka

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Metformin, Diabetes Mellitus, Adverse effects of metformin, How does metformin work, Mechanism of action of metformin, Indications of metformin, Contraindications of metformin, Blood Glucose, Hypoglycemia, Side Effects of metformin Adverse effects of metformin, Oral hypoglycemic Drugs, Metformin and lactic Acidosis, Type II diabetes mellitus, NIDDM, Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, Uses of Metformin. About Me: Dr. Sumit Verma MD, DNB , with more than 15 years of experience in clinical medicine / clinical research / pharmacovigilance domain I have co-authored a book titled "Fundamentals of Pharmacovigilance" (http://www.amazon.in/Fundamentals-Pha...) https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-sumit-... Disclaimer: Medicine is an ever-changing science. The information presented in the video or on this channel is of a general informational nature and should not be considered as specific to the needs of a particular individual or organisation or entity. Please consult your doctor, medical specialist or your health care professional for all matters related to health. The video does not contain all the information about any drug. Any information presented in the video or on this channel does not replace any advice given to you by your doctor, medical specialist or your health care professional. If you have any queries or concerns regarding the information presented in the video or on this channel, please consult your doctor, specialist, your health care professional or seek professional advise. Any use of information presented herein (including content of the videos or on this channel) is at the user's own risk. The author, presenter or any other parties associated with the content of the videos or on this channel do not assume and hereby disclaim any liability (including, without limitation, damages for loss of data or profit, or due to business interruption) to any party for any loss, damage, or disruption that may directly or indirectly result from use of any information or graphics in the videos or on this channel. The author, presenter or any other parties associated with the content (presented in the videos or on this channel) will not be held liable for any errors or omissions that may be found in the content of the videos or on this channel. Any information presented in the video or on this channel is provided 'as is'. The author, presenter or any other parties associated with the content of the videos or on this channel, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and hereby disclaim and negate all other warranties, including without limitation, implied warranties or conditions of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, or non-infringement of intellectual property or other violation of rights. Further, the author, presenter or any other parties associated with the content of the videos or on this channel do not warrant or make any representations concerning the accuracy, likely results, or reliability of the use of the materials on the video or on this channel. The materials appearing on the video or on this channel may include technical, typographical, or photographic errors. The author, presenter or any other parties associated with the content of the videos or on this channel do not warrant that any of the materials presented herein are accurate, complete, or current. No one should act on any information presented in the videos or on this channel without specific professional advise.

Contraindications To Metformin Therapy In Patients With Niddm.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: Treatment with metformin is occasionally associated with the development of severe lactic acidosis. However, this is usually observed in patients with major contraindications to the drug. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of conditions currently regarded as either contraindications or cautions to the use of metformin in patients with NIDDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The case notes of metformin-treated NIDDM patients (mean age 62 years) attending a United Kingdom university hospital diabetes clinic over a 3-month period were reviewed according to criteria reflecting a pragmatic view of current prescribing recommendations. RESULTS: Of 89 consecutive patients whose notes could be evaluated in detail, only 41 (46%) had no contraindications or cautions to metformin whatsoever. Concomitant chronic disorders associated with a potentially increased risk of hyperlactatemia were renal impairment (n = 2; plasma creatinine concentrations 1.7 and 2.3 mg/dl, respectively), cardiac failure (n = 2), and chronic liver disease (n = 2). Other potentially relevant disorders included ischemic heart disease (n = 20), clinical proteinuria (n = 14), peripheral vasc Continue reading >>

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  1. Kingleonidas

    Metformin and DKA>>

    Just wondering, I have read that taking metformin without food can lead to dka, or does this usually pertain to people who eat absolutely nothing or very little all day?
    I am going to start my 850mg three times a day at about 4-5am, 9-10am, then again at the end of the day when I go to bed.
    Has anyone had a problem with metformin and dka?
    Thanks.

  2. MarkM

    no, metformin won't cause dka. its main action is to inhibit glycogenolysis. only insufficient insulin will cause dka. metformin can cause lactic acidosis, but it is not the same thing as ketoacidosis (dka).

  3. Ken S

    Studies have also shown that the risk of getting lactic acidosis with or without taking metformin is about the same. This is an extremely rare affliction that only really seems to affect patients with serious preexisting health problems. It's really not an issue to be concerned about.
    As for DKA, metformin is contradicted in cases where patients are experiencing symptoms of DKA, and therefore it may be surmised that it may worsen this condition, although it does not seem to cause it.

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Metformin 500 mg review is here! If you want to know about Metformin how it works and Metformin side effects and also lots of other answers of questions related to metformin is given in this video.

Metformin In Type 1 Diabetes

Is this a good or bad idea? The article by Meyer et al. (1) revives a debate regarding the appropriateness of metformin use for people with type 1 diabetes. Given the potential for coexisting lactic acidosis and diabetic ketoacidosis, how can one justify its use? Indeed, there was little reason to expect a benefit in patients who were studied: nonobese type 1 diabetic subjects with HbA1c <9.0% who were taking ∼0.7 units · kg insulin−1 · day−1. A modest average reduction of daily insulin requirements, 4.3 units, as compared with an increase of 1.7 units for placebo, does not seem to be worth the trade-off of increased risk for severe hypoglycemia (19 events in metformin group vs. 8 events in placebo group). There was no differential effect in terms of HbA1c. Only 7 of 31 patients (23%) treated with metformin responded in terms of a significant (20%) reduction in insulin requirement. Furthermore, it is likely that the incidence of hypoglycemia would be much greater if more aggressive metabolic targets of HbA1c had been applied. Despite the failure to observe diabetic ketoacidosis, the limited number and short period of observation does not permit the conclusion that metformin Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Kingleonidas

    Metformin and DKA>>

    Just wondering, I have read that taking metformin without food can lead to dka, or does this usually pertain to people who eat absolutely nothing or very little all day?
    I am going to start my 850mg three times a day at about 4-5am, 9-10am, then again at the end of the day when I go to bed.
    Has anyone had a problem with metformin and dka?
    Thanks.

  2. MarkM

    no, metformin won't cause dka. its main action is to inhibit glycogenolysis. only insufficient insulin will cause dka. metformin can cause lactic acidosis, but it is not the same thing as ketoacidosis (dka).

  3. Ken S

    Studies have also shown that the risk of getting lactic acidosis with or without taking metformin is about the same. This is an extremely rare affliction that only really seems to affect patients with serious preexisting health problems. It's really not an issue to be concerned about.
    As for DKA, metformin is contradicted in cases where patients are experiencing symptoms of DKA, and therefore it may be surmised that it may worsen this condition, although it does not seem to cause it.

  4. -> Continue reading
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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Challenging Diabetes Phenotype

HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland Summary We describe three patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to ketosis prone type 2, rather than type 1 diabetes. All patients were treated according to a standard DKA protocol, but were subsequently able to come off insulin therapy while maintaining good glycaemic control. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) presenting with DKA has not been described previously in Irish patients. The absence of islet autoimmunity and evidence of endogenous beta cell function after resolution of DKA are well-established markers of KPD, but are not readily available in the acute setting. Although not emphasised in any current guidelines, we have found that a strong family history of type 2 diabetes and the presence of cutaneous markers of insulin resistance are strongly suggestive of KPD. These could be emphasised in future clinical practice guidelines. Learning points: Even in white patients, DKA is not synonymous with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune beta cell failure. KPD needs to be considered in all patients presenting with DKA, even though it will not influence their Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Kingleonidas

    Metformin and DKA>>

    Just wondering, I have read that taking metformin without food can lead to dka, or does this usually pertain to people who eat absolutely nothing or very little all day?
    I am going to start my 850mg three times a day at about 4-5am, 9-10am, then again at the end of the day when I go to bed.
    Has anyone had a problem with metformin and dka?
    Thanks.

  2. MarkM

    no, metformin won't cause dka. its main action is to inhibit glycogenolysis. only insufficient insulin will cause dka. metformin can cause lactic acidosis, but it is not the same thing as ketoacidosis (dka).

  3. Ken S

    Studies have also shown that the risk of getting lactic acidosis with or without taking metformin is about the same. This is an extremely rare affliction that only really seems to affect patients with serious preexisting health problems. It's really not an issue to be concerned about.
    As for DKA, metformin is contradicted in cases where patients are experiencing symptoms of DKA, and therefore it may be surmised that it may worsen this condition, although it does not seem to cause it.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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