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Metformin And Dka

Sglt2 Inhibitors [invokana (canagliflozin), Forxiga (dapagliflozin), Xigduo (dapagliflozin/metformin), Jardiance (empagliflozin)] - Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sglt2 Inhibitors [invokana (canagliflozin), Forxiga (dapagliflozin), Xigduo (dapagliflozin/metformin), Jardiance (empagliflozin)] - Risk Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Report a Concern Audience Healthcare professionals including internal medicine specialists, endocrinologists, cardiologists, nephrologists, general or family practitioners, emergency healthcare professionals, critical care physicians, certified diabetes educators and pharmacists. Key messages Serious, sometimes life-threatening and fatal cases of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have been reported in patients on sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In a number of these cases, the presentation of the condition was atypical with only moderately increased blood glucose levels observed. SGLT2 inhibitors are NOT indicated for treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and should not be used in type 1 diabetes. It is recommended that: if DKA is suspected or diagnosed, treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors should be discontinued immediately. SGLT2 inhibitors should not be used in patients with a history of DKA. in clinical situations known to predispose to ketoacidosis (e.g. major surgical procedures, serious infections and acute serious illness), consideration be given to temporarily discontinuing SGLT2 inhibitor therapy. patients be informed of the signs and symptoms of DKA and be advised to immediately seek medical attention if they develop them. caution be used before initiating SGLT2 inhibitor treatment in patients with risk factors for DKA. The Canadian Product Monographs of these products will be updated to reflect this safety information. Issue Clinical trial and post-market cases of DKA, a serious, life-threatening condition requiring urgent hospitalization have been reported in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus on SGLT2 inhibitor treatment. In a number of these reports, the presentation of the condition was atypical with Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors Side Effects

Sglt2 Inhibitors Side Effects

Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are intended to treat Type 2 diabetes along with diet and exercise. They have also been prescribed for off-label, or unapproved, uses including weight loss. The active ingredients in the drugs are different gliflozin compounds. SGLT2 inhibitors approved for use in the U.S. include: In addition, some medications combine SGLT2 inhibitors with other diabetes drugs. These include: Metformin decreases glucose production in the liver while increasing the body’s ability to absorb glucose. It is often used in conjunction with insulin as well as SGLT2 inhibitors to treat Type 2 diabetes. It carries additional risks of side effects. Linagliptin works by regulating insulin levels after meals. When first approved, SGLT2 inhibitors took a revolutionary approach to controlling blood sugar in diabetic patients. The drugs cause the body to direct excess glucose to the kidneys. From there, it is expelled through a patient’s urine. SGLT2 Inhibitor Side Effects Range from Minor to Life-Threatening While the way SGLT2 drugs work is unique, this can also lead to unique side effects. For example, because the drugs cause excess sugar to escape the body in urine, it can also lead to yeast infections and urinary tract infections. The drugs primarily work in the kidneys, so these drugs are not for people with weak kidney function. Some studies also show these drugs may lead to dangerous kidney infections and kidney failure. Side effects can lead from simple annoyances such as dry mouth to more serious complications including kidney injuries. Common SGLT2 Inhibitor Side Effect Symptoms: Abdominal pain Back pain Constipation Dry mouth Fatigue Increased cholesterol Increased urination Influenza Male and female yeast infections Nausea Thirst Urin Continue reading >>

Metformin And Diabetic Ketoacidosis - From Fda Reports

Metformin And Diabetic Ketoacidosis - From Fda Reports

Diabetic ketoacidosis is found among people who take Metformin, especially for people who are female, 60+ old , have been taking the drug for 1 - 6 months, also take medication Invokana, and have High blood pressure. This review analyzes which people have Diabetic ketoacidosis with Metformin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 199,020 people who have side effects when taking Metformin from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Metformin and have Diabetic ketoacidosis, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Metformin and have Diabetic ketoacidosis Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Number of reports submitted per year: < 1 month: 22.58 % 1 - 6 months: 24.73 % 6 - 12 months: 9.68 % 1 - 2 years: 8.6 % 2 - 5 years: 20.43 % 5 - 10 years: 7.53 % 10+ years: 6.45 % Gender of people who have Diabetic ketoacidosis when taking Metformin *: female: 55.85 % male: 44.15 % Age of people who have Diabetic ketoacidosis when taking Metformin *: 0-1: 0.0 % 2-9: 0.0 % 10-19: 0.63 % 20-29: 5.07 % 30-39: 12.68 % 40-49: 21.85 % 50-59: 26.92 % 60+: 32.84 % Top conditions involved for these people *: High Blood Pressure (133 people, 7.77%) Depression (70 people, 4.09%) Type 1 Diabetes (67 people, 3.91%) High Blood Cholesterol (57 people, 3.33%) Stress And Anxiety (41 people, 2.39%) Top co-used drugs for these people *: Invokana (411 people, 24.01%) Lantus (233 people, 13.61%) Jardiance (147 people, 8.59%) Insulin (136 people, 7.94%) Seroquel (110 people, 6.43%) Top other side effects for these people Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treated With Sglt2 Inhibitors And Other Antihyperglycemic Agents

Incidence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treated With Sglt2 Inhibitors And Other Antihyperglycemic Agents

Highlights • Overall, unadjusted DKA incidence were similar between SGLT2 and non-SGLT2 agents. • Overall, unadjusted DKA incidence dropped by ∼50% when excluding potential autoimmune diabetes. • Primary analysis found no statistically significant increased risk of DKA with SGLT2 inhibitors. • No increased risk of DKA with SGLT2 inhibitors when excluding potential autoimmune diabetes. • More than half of the DKA cases met the definition of potential autoimmune diabetes. Abstract To estimate and compare incidence of diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) among patients with type 2 diabetes who are newly treated with SGLT2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) versus non-SGLT2i antihyperglycemic agents (AHAs) in actual clinical practice. A new-user cohort study design using a large insurance claims database in the US. DKA incidence was compared between new users of SGLT2i and new users of non-SGLT2i AHAs pair-matched on exposure propensity scores (EPS) using Cox regression models. Overall, crude incidence rates (95% CI) per 1000 patient-years for DKA were 1.69 (1.22–2.30) and 1.83 (1.58–2.10) among new users of SGLT2i (n = 34,442) and non-SGLT2i AHAs (n = 126,703). These rates more than doubled among patients with prior insulin prescriptions but decreased by more than half in analyses that excluded potential autoimmune diabetes (PAD). The hazard ratio (95% CI) for DKA comparing new users of SGLT2i to new users of non-SGLT2i AHAs was 1.91 (0.94–4.11) (p = 0.09) among the 30,196 EPS-matched pairs overall, and 1.13 (0.43–3.00) (p = 0.81) among the 27,515 EPS-matched pairs that excluded PAD. This was the first observational study that compared DKA risk between new users of SGLT2i and non-SGLT2i AHAs among patients with type 2 diabetes, and overall no statistically significant differen Continue reading >>

Metformin, Sitagliptin Prolong Normoglycemia Remission In Dka

Metformin, Sitagliptin Prolong Normoglycemia Remission In Dka

Findings in African-American patients with new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hyperglycemia FRIDAY, Sept. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) — For patients with new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and severe hyperglycemia, metformin and sitagliptin treatment after normoglycemia remission correlate with increased relapse-free survival and prolonged remission, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in Diabetes Care. Priyathama Vellanki, M.D., from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a prospective four-year study involving 48 African-American subjects with DKA and severe hyperglycemia. Participants were randomized to metformin (17 participants), sitagliptin (16 participants), or placebo (15 participants) after normoglycemia remission. Oral glucose tolerance tests were conducted at randomization, at three months, and every six months for a median of 331 days. The researchers found that the metformin and sitagliptin groups had significantly higher relapse-free survival compared with placebo (P = 0.015), and significantly prolonged mean time to relapse (480 versus 305 days; P = 0.004). Compared with placebo, the probability of relapse was significantly lower for metformin and sitagliptin (hazard ratios, 0.28 and 0.31, respectively). Compared with those with hyperglycemia relapse, individuals who remained in remission had a higher disposition index and incremental area under the curve for insulin, with no significant changes in insulin sensitivity. “This study shows that near-normoglycemia remission was similarly prolonged by treatment with sitagliptin and metformin,” the authors write. “The prolongation of remission was due to improvement in β-cell function.” Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Intercurrent Illness

Diabetes And Intercurrent Illness

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. Principles The stress of illness can increase basal insulin requirements in all types of people with diabetes. Being ill may also render the person with diabetes unable to monitor and manage their condition as they would normally. Some people with diabetes may associate insulin dosing with eating, so during a period of anorexia or vomiting they may feel that they do not need to take their normal insulin regimen, whereas they ought to maintain it, or even increase the dose. There is also a need to keep up carbohydrate intake. These measures help reduce the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis and poor diabetes control. Patients taking metformin should receive special attention, as continuing this medication during periods of dehydration or acute illness can increase the risk of lactic acidosis or a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Cornerstones of diabetes management during intercurrent illness (patients on oral hypoglycaemics and/or insulin)[1] Contact a GP or diabetes team who will help with any queries or any uncertainty about what to do. Keep taking insulin and/or most diabetes medications - even when not feeling like eating. The dose of medication may need to be altered. It is advisable to stop taking a SGLT2 inhibitor (eg, dapagliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin) if unwell and unable to eat or drink. If this is the case, it is essential to contact a GP/diabetes team for advice as soon as possible. If using insulin treatment, test blood glucose more often, at least every four hours, Continue reading >>

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION Lactate levels greater than 2 mmol/L represent hyperlactatemia, whereas lactic acidosis is generally defined as a serum lactate concentration above 4 mmol/L. Lactic acidosis is the most common cause of metabolic acidosis in hospitalized patients. Although the acidosis is usually associated with an elevated anion gap, moderately increased lactate levels can be observed with a normal anion gap (especially if hypoalbuminemia exists and the anion gap is not appropriately corrected). When lactic acidosis exists as an isolated acid-base disturbance, the arterial pH is reduced. However, other coexisting disorders can raise the pH into the normal range or even generate an elevated pH. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis", section on 'Assessment of the serum anion gap' and "Simple and mixed acid-base disorders".) Lactic acidosis occurs when lactic acid production exceeds lactic acid clearance. The increase in lactate production is usually caused by impaired tissue oxygenation, either from decreased oxygen delivery or a defect in mitochondrial oxygen utilization. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis".) The pathophysiology and causes of lactic acidosis will be reviewed here. The possible role of bicarbonate therapy in such patients is discussed separately. (See "Bicarbonate therapy in lactic acidosis".) PATHOPHYSIOLOGY A review of the biochemistry of lactate generation and metabolism is important in understanding the pathogenesis of lactic acidosis [1]. Both overproduction and reduced metabolism of lactate appear to be operative in most patients. Cellular lactate generation is influenced by the "redox state" of the cell. The redox state in the cellular cytoplasm is reflected by the ratio of oxidized and reduced nicotine ad Continue reading >>

Viewer Comments: Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Viewer Comments: Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

I didn't know anything about diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) until I was admitted into the ICU. Learning about DKA now, I've had moderate DKA on and off for years. I thought my vomiting, stomach pain were the result of metformin and switched to Invokana. I experienced extreme weight loss and dehydration but thought these were normal (Invokana shown to help diabetics lose weight). I have been under extreme financial and emotional stress for the past few years as well. What I would want others to know is that it is difficult to identify DKA from medication side effects; until DKA is at the ICU level. I was given so much potassium and other electrolytes. Stress is also a huge factor for me. While in the ICU my ex-husband (knowing I was in the ICU) started more harassment. The nurses documented an over 100 jump in my blood sugar after a phone call to deal with the harassment. I've started tracking stress and my blood sugar. It is impossible to get control of my blood sugar during high stress. If I add more insulin, I have a dangerous crash later. Keeping a calm environment as much as I can helps. I have type 2 diabetes. I gave myself more than 300 shots. My doctor put me on metformin. This takes the place of insulin shots. There are three different doses. What made it for me was 850 mg per meal. I count my carbohydrates, 60 per meal, and take my pill. I have seen here, folks that have 200, 300, 695 mg/dl of glucose. It is tough to manage, but if you keep to it, you will do well. Check the bottoms of your feet daily. If you are ticklish, you are doing fine. Give up cakes, pies, ice cream and other things high in carbohydrates. If you do, you will be fine. By the way, my average glucose reading is less than 120. Set that as your goal. Have good days! I have been having really dif Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What's Behind The Fda Warning

Sglt2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What's Behind The Fda Warning

With commentary by Yehuda Handelsman, MD, FACP, FACE, FNLA, an endocrinologist in private practice in Tarzana, CA, Medical Director and Principal Investigator of the Metabolic Institute of America and President of the American College of Endocrinology People with diabetes who take blood sugar-lowering drugs called SGLT2 inhibitors were recently warned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that they should watch for signs of a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. canagliflozin (Invokana) dapagliflozin (Farxiga) empagliflozin (Jardiance) as well as the combination pills: canagliflozin plus metformin (Invokamet) dapagliflozin plus metformin extended-release (Xigduo XR) empagliflozin plus linagliptin (Glyxambi). “Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can be deadly,” says Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE, an advanced practice dietitian at the University of Chicago Kovler Diabetes Center and a member of EndocrineWeb’s advisory board. “DKA is usually more of a concern for people with type 1 diabetes, but this warning is for people with type 2 diabetes who are taking the SGLT2 inhibitors, as well as people with type 1 diabetes who take these medications off label. DKA — dangerously high acid levels in the bloodstream — happens when your body breaks down fat instead of glucose for energy, releasing acidic compounds called ketones. Early symptoms include thirst, frequent urination and sweet, fruity breath, Hess-Fischl says. You may feel tired and confused, and develop nausea, stomach pain, vomiting and difficulty breathing. “If you notice symptoms, call your doctor immediately. But if you’re vomiting, can’t catch your breath or are concerned, go to the emergency room,” she says. Putting the Risk in Perspective The FDA warning, relea Continue reading >>

Metformin: An Old But Still The Best Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin: An Old But Still The Best Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract The management of T2DM requires aggressive treatment to achieve glycemic and cardiovascular risk factor goals. In this setting, metformin, an old and widely accepted first line agent, stands out not only for its antihyperglycemic properties but also for its effects beyond glycemic control such as improvements in endothelial dysfunction, hemostasis and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, lipid profiles, and fat redistribution. These properties may have contributed to the decrease of adverse cardiovascular outcomes otherwise not attributable to metformin’s mere antihyperglycemic effects. Several other classes of oral antidiabetic agents have been recently launched, introducing the need to evaluate the role of metformin as initial therapy and in combination with these newer drugs. There is increasing evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies supporting its anti-proliferative role in cancer and possibly a neuroprotective effect. Metformin’s negligible risk of hypoglycemia in monotherapy and few drug interactions of clinical relevance give this drug a high safety profile. The tolerability of metformin may be improved by using an appropiate dose titration, starting with low doses, so that side-effects can be minimized or by switching to an extended release form. We reviewed the role of metformin in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and describe the additional benefits beyond its glycemic effect. We also discuss its potential role for a variety of insulin resistant and pre-diabetic states, obesity, metabolic abnormalities associated with HIV disease, gestational diabetes, cancer, and neuroprotection. Introduction The discovery of metformin began with the synthesis of galegine-like compounds derived from Gallega officinalis, a plant traditionally em Continue reading >>

Glossary

Glossary

A1C A test that gives you a picture of your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. The results show how well your diabetes is being controlled. The A1C test does this by measuring the amount of sugar (glucose) that has attached to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. More sugar (glucose) means a higher A1C. autoimmune “Autoimmune" refers to diseases in which the body thinks its own cells and tissues don't belong and attacks them. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system wrongly destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This leads to lower-than-normal insulin in the body. The causes of autoimmune diseases are not known. basal insulin See long-acting insulin. beta cells Special cells in the pancreas (in the islets of Langerhans) that make and release insulin in response to sugar (glucose) levels. In people with diabetes, the beta cells release less insulin than normal or none at all. biguanide See metformin. blood sugar (or blood glucose) The main sugar (glucose) found in the blood, and the body’s main source of energy. blood sugar readings (or blood glucose readings) The amount of sugar in a given amount of blood. It is measured in milligrams per deciliter, or mg/dL. A blood glucose goal for people with type 2 diabetes is 80 to 130 mg/dL before meals, less than 180 mg/dL 2 hours after meals. bolus insulin (prandial or mealtime insulin) An extra amount of insulin taken to cover an expected rise in blood sugar during or after a meal or snack. It can also be taken when blood sugar is high. carbohydrates Carbohydrates are the main kind of food that raise blood sugar levels. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (sugar), and then uses this sugar as a source of energy for your cells. There are three main Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis: A Diabetes Complication

Ketoacidosis: A Diabetes Complication

Ketoacidosis can affect both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes patients. It's a possible short-term complication of diabetes, one caused by hyperglycemia—and one that can be avoided. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are two of the most serious complications of diabetes. These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of mortality among persons with diabetes in spite of all of the advances in understanding diabetes. The annual incidence rate of DKA estimated from population-based studies ranges from 4.8 to 8 episodes per 1,000 patients with diabetes. Unfortunately, in the US, incidents of hospitalization due to DKA have increased. Currently, 4% to 9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes include DKA. The incidence of HHS is more difficult to determine because of lack of population studies but it is still high at around 15%. The prognosis of both conditions is substantially worsened at the extremes of age, and in the presence of coma and hypertension. Why and How Does Ketoacidosis Occur? The pathogenesis of DKA is more understood than HHS but both relate to the basic underlying reduction in the net effective action of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counter regulatory hormones such as glucagons, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone. These hormonal alterations in both DKA and HHS lead to increased hepatic and renal glucose production and impaired use of glucose in peripheral tissues, which results in hyperglycemia and parallel changes in osmolality in extracellular space. This same combination also leads to release of free fatty acids into the circulation from adipose tissue and to unrestrained hepatic fatty acid oxidation to ketone bodies. Some drugs ca Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Challenging Diabetes Phenotype

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Challenging Diabetes Phenotype

HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway Ireland Summary We describe three patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to ketosis prone type 2, rather than type 1 diabetes. All patients were treated according to a standard DKA protocol, but were subsequently able to come off insulin therapy while maintaining good glycaemic control. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) presenting with DKA has not been described previously in Irish patients. The absence of islet autoimmunity and evidence of endogenous beta cell function after resolution of DKA are well-established markers of KPD, but are not readily available in the acute setting. Although not emphasised in any current guidelines, we have found that a strong family history of type 2 diabetes and the presence of cutaneous markers of insulin resistance are strongly suggestive of KPD. These could be emphasised in future clinical practice guidelines. Learning points: Even in white patients, DKA is not synonymous with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune beta cell failure. KPD needs to be considered in all patients presenting with DKA, even though it will not influence their initial treatment. Aside from markers of endogenous beta cell function and islet autoimmunity, which in any case are unlikely to be immediately available to clinicians, consideration of family history of type 2 diabetes and cutaneous markers of insulin resistance might help to identify those with KPD and are more readily apparent in the acute setting, though not emphasised in guidelines. Consideration of KPD should never alter the management of the acute severe metabolic derangement of DKA, and phasing out of insulin therapy requires frequent attendance and meticulous and cautious surveillanc Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute complication of diabetes that occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and a characteristic fruity odor on the breath. Diabetic ketoacidosis is diagnosed by blood tests that show high levels of glucose, ketones, and acid. Treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis involves intravenous fluid replacement and insulin. Without treatment, diabetic ketoacidosis can progress to coma and death. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In both types, the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood is elevated. Glucose is one of the body's main fuels. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. helps glucose move from the blood into the cells. Once glucose is inside the cells, it is either converted to energy or stored as fat or glycogen until it is needed. When there is not enough insulin, most cells cannot use the glucose that is in the blood. Because cells still need energy to survive, they switch to a back-up mechanism to obtain energy. Fat cells begin breaking down, producing compounds called ketones. Ketones provide some energy to cells but also make the blood too acidic (ketoacidosis). Ketoacidosis that occurs in people with diabetes is called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs mainly in people who have type 1 diabetes because their body produces little or no insulin. However, rarely, some people with type 2 diabetes develop ketoacidosis. People who abuse alcohol also can develop ketoacidosis (alcoholic ketoacidosis). Causes Diabetic ketoacidosis is sometimes the first sign that people (usually children—see also Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)) have developed diabetes. In people who know they have diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis can occur f Continue reading >>

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