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Metabolic Compensation For Respiratory Acidosis

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asth

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [ 1 ] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis , Metabolic Acidosis , and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis .) Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 Continue reading >>

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  1. weaselposse

    Welcome to Reddit.
    Come for the cats, stay for the empathy.

    Become a Redditor
    and start exploring.

  2. Junkbot

    You get used to it. Drink lots of water, chew some gum.

  3. weaselposse

    I drink like 3 litres a day and have mints/mouth was and it just seems like it never leaves

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Made during my first semester at medical school and in response to an online request, this video walks you through the basics of understanding the compensation of acids and bases in the body. ABG Cards for Quick Reference: https://amzn.to/2MGvjfU EKG Cards for Quick Reference: https://amzn.to/2Krefht Acid-base, Fluids and Electrolytes Made Ridiculously Simple: https://amzn.to/2KB3bug

Assessment Of Compensation In Acute Respiratory Acidosis - Deranged Physiology

Assessment of Compensation in Acute Respiratory Acidosis Mechanisms and classification of metabolic acidosis This chapter is concerned with the changes in pH and serum bicarbonate which result from acute fluctuations in dissolved CO2, as a consequence of acute changes in ventilation. It is a more detailed look at the wayCO2interacts with the human body fluid, and the resulting changes which develop in theserum bicarbonate concentration and pH. The discussion which follows builds upon and benefits from someof thebackground knowledgeoffered in otherchapters: Let us consider the favoured model of acute respiratory acidosis, the patient who has stopped breathing. Conventional wisdom dictates that so long as the oxygen supply continues to mass-transfer its way into the patient, then the patient will continue to produce CO2, and as a result of this metabolic activity the PaCO2will rise at a rate of around 3mmHg every minute. This technique of "apnoeic anaesthesia" is well known to anaesthetists, and has enjoyed a fluctuating level of interest since the sixties. With a high PEEP and a sufficient attention to detail one may go through the entire hour-long case without any breaths being ta Continue reading >>

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  1. HOUNDLOVER1

    I suspect it is a virus, but changing diet (in any way) can be temporarily stressful and challenge the immune system. This should be a minor and short-lived problem. Best wishes
    Birgit
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  2. BUDGETMAW

    Mom used to make us Egg Drop Soup when we were sick - Lipton's Chicken Noodle Soup (the dehydrated kind), make into soup and then an egg or two beaten into it. Nowadays I just use chicken broth and eggs. It feels really good going down a sore throat. Sometimes I add veggies, too - mushrooms, frozen spinach, a little tomato, maybe some green onions.
    Hope you feel better soon!

  3. GOALISSIZE8

    Thanks! I like the idea of some chicken broth and low carb veggies (zucchini has been my favorite lately). I know in the past I had never had any issues once I started on low carb foods. I had never even heard of keto flu until this last time I started getting back into the message boards.
    At least if it's a cold, it should pass in a couple of days. I'm not craving any carby "comfort" foods, so that is good.
    Starting 4/26/16
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Acute Renal Response To Rapid Onset Respiratory Acidosis

Acute Renal Response to Rapid Onset Respiratory Acidosis Jayanth Ramadoss , Randolph H. Stewart , and Timothy A. Cudd Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology and Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843, USA Send correspondence to: Timothy A. Cudd, DVM, PhD, Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Hwy 60, Building VMA, Rm 332, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4466 Fax: 979-845-6544 [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Can J Physiol Pharmacol See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Renal strong ion compensation to chronic respiratory acidosis has been established but the nature of the response to acute respiratory acidosis is not well defined. We hypothesized that the response to acute respiratory acidosis in sheep is a rapid increase in the difference in renal fractional excretions of chloride and sodium (FeCl-FeNa). Inspired CO2 concentrations were increased for one hour to alter significantly PaCO2 and pHa from 32 1 mm Continue reading >>

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  1. Enigmae

    Hello All,
    I've been a recent ketoer and loving the lifestyle. I am looking into doing ensurance athletics, like ultramarathoning, etc.. and in a lot of literature they indicate that ketogenic offers similar performance here is a quote... i wondered if there is any science to back this up?
    from: http://trainright.com/should-endurance-athletes-go-keto-ketosis-ketogenic-diets-for-endurance-athletes/
    1
    .`KETOSIS IS PHYSIOLOGICALLY LIMITING
    Without stored and exogenous carbohydrate during competition, you have very little fuel available for anaerobic glycolysis, the metabolic shortcut that rapidly produces energy by partially burning carbohydrate to meet elevated energy demands during short, high-intensity efforts. Ketones can be converted to acetyl-coA and metabolized aerobically in mitochondria, but you miss out on the turbocharged boost from anaerobic glycolysis. You also miss out on the lactate produced from anaerobic glycolysis, but lactate isn’t the enemy it was once thought to be. It is partially-burned carbohydrate that gets broken down to usable energy.
    The reason I say you’ll have little carbohydrate available for anaerobic glycolysis instead of no carbohydrate is because an athlete in ketosis can still produce glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis. In plain English this means athletes in ketosis have limited capacity for high-intensity efforts that rely on carbohydrate for fuel. (It is intriguing to note the amount of available glycogen increased in the long-term fat-adapted athletes in Volek’s study with elite ultrarunners.)`
    Luckily they do reference many papers, but I was curious what others thought. I am reading through those references and in the article they discuss that for intense prologned activity they recommend not doing keto since your liver can't keep up.

    References and Suggested Reading:
    Burke, Louise M., Megan L. Ross, Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Marijke Welvaert, Ida A. Heikura, Sara G. Forbes, Joanne G. Mirtschin, Louise E. Cato, Nicki Strobel, Avish P. Sharma, and John A. Hawley. “Low Carbohydrate, High Fat Diet Impairs Exercise Economy and Negates the Performance Benefit from Intensified Training in Elite Race Walkers.” The Journal of Physiology (2016).
    Burke, L. M. “”Fat Adaptation” for Athletic Performance: The Nail in the Coffin?” Journal of Applied Physiology 100.1 (2006): 7-8.
    Burke, Louise M. “Re-Examining High-Fat Diets for Sports Performance: Did We Call the ‘Nail in the Coffin’ Too Soon?” Sports Medicine 45.S1 (2015): 33-49.
    Cox, Pete J., and Kieran Clarke. “Acute Nutritional Ketosis: Implications for Exercise Performance and Metabolism.” Extreme Physiology & Medicine. BioMed Central, 2014.
    Cox, Peter J., Tom Kirk, Tom Ashmore, Kristof Willerton, Rhys Evans, Alan Smith, Andrew J. Murray, Brianna Stubbs, James West, Stewart W. Mclure, M. Todd King, Michael S. Dodd, Cameron Holloway, Stefan Neubauer, Scott Drawer, Richard L. Veech, Julian L. Griffin, and Kieran Clarke. “Nutritional Ketosis Alters Fuel Preference and Thereby Endurance Performance in Athletes.” Cell Metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-68.
    Havemann, L. “Fat Adaptation Followed by Carbohydrate Loading Compromises High-intensity Sprint Performance.” Journal of Applied Physiology 100.1 (2006): 194-202.
    Marquet, Laurie-Anne, Jeanick Brisswalter, Julien Louis, Eve Tiollier, Louise M. Burke, John A. Hawley, and Christophe Hausswirth. “Enhanced Endurance Performance by Periodization of Carbohydrate Intake.” Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 48.4 (2016): 663-72.
    Pinckaers, Philippe J. M., Tyler A. Churchward-Venne, David Bailey, and Luc J. C. Van Loon. “Ketone Bodies and Exercise Performance: The Next Magic Bullet or Merely Hype?” Sports Medicine (2016).
    Volek, Jeff S., Daniel J. Freidenreich, Catherine Saenz, Laura J. Kunces, Brent C. Creighton, Jenna M. Bartley, Patrick M. Davitt, Colleen X. Munoz, Jeffrey M. Anderson, Carl M. Maresh, Elaine C. Lee, Mark D. Schuenke, Giselle Aerni, William J. Kraemer, and Stephen D. Phinney. “Metabolic Characteristics of Keto-adapted Ultra-endurance Runners.” Metabolism 65.3 (2016): 100-10.
    Zajac, Adam, Stanislaw Poprzecki, Adam Maszczyk, Milosz Czuba, Malgorzata Michalczyk, and Grzegorz Zydek. “The Effects of a Ketogenic Diet on Exercise Metabolism and Physical Performance in Off-Road Cyclists.” Nutrients 6.7 (2014): 2493-508..

  2. OldDoug

    Hi Lucas. I just read something pertinent, here, which CarolT kindly gave a link to: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0026049515003340
    1 A couple quotes:
    "Compared to highly trained ultra-endurance athletes consuming an HC diet, long-term keto-adaptation results in extraordinarily high rates of fat oxidation, whereas muscle glycogen utilization and repletion patterns during and after a 3 hour run are similar."
    "Thus, we show for the first time that chronic keto-adaptation in elite ultra-endurance athletes is associated with a robust capacity to increase fat oxidation during exercise while maintaining normal skeletal muscle glycogen concentrations."
    The whole thing is a good read. The study subjects were elite athletes, but among them, I don't think there was any problem with their livers not being able to keep up, among the low-carbohydrate group.
    Here's how the "Low-Carb" group was defined, for the study: "Subjects consuming an LC diet, defined as < 20% energy from carbohydrate and > 60% from fat, consistently for at least 6 months were eligible for the LC group."

    Less than 20% carbs is not as restrictive as it could be, but the performance of the group indicates they were very well fat-adapted, in my opinion.

  3. jmbundy

    Enigmae:
    Without stored and exogenous carbohydrate during competition, you have very little fuel available for anaerobic glycolysis, the metabolic shortcut that rapidly produces energy by partially burning carbohydrate to meet elevated energy demands during short, high-intensity efforts.
    This is correct, but also the opposite of what you are talking about. Anaerobic is very high intensity, all out effort like a sprint. Ketosis is not well suited for sprinters. However you mention endurance training and specifically ultra-marathon which is the opposite of that and is perfectly suited for Keto.

    The FASTER study is the best I have personally read related to this so check it out here
    2

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