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Metabolic Acidosis Treatment Ppt

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What is renal tubular acidosis (RTA)? RTA is a type of metabolic acidosis caused by the kidneys failure to properly acidify the urine. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what youre learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Sumant Nanduri Omar Berrios Alex Wright Sabrina Wong Suzanne Peek Arfan Azam Mingli Fng Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the worlds caregivers with the best learning experience possible.

Metabolic Acidosis Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Type 1 Renal Tubular Acidosis, Type 2 Renal Tubular Acidosis

Metabolic AcidosisTreatment & Management Author: Christie P Thomas, MBBS, FRCP, FASN, FAHA; Chief Editor: Vecihi Batuman, MD, FASN more... Treatment of acute metabolic acidosis by alkali therapy is usually indicated to raise and maintain the plasma pH to greater than 7.20. In the following two circumstances this is particularly important. When the serum pH is below 7.20, a continued fall in the serum HCO3- level may result in a significant drop in pH. This is especially true when the PCO2 is close to the lower limit of compensation, which in an otherwise healthy young individual is approximately 15 mm Hg. With increasing age and other complicating illnesses, the limit of compensation is likely to be less. A further small drop in HCO3- at this point thus is not matched by a corresponding fall in PaCO2, and rapid decompensation can occur. For example, in a patient with metabolic acidosis with a serum HCO3- level of 9 mEq/L and a maximally compensated PCO2 of 20 mm Hg, a drop in the serum HCO3- level to 7 mEq/L results in a change in pH from 7.28 to 7.16. A second situation in which HCO3- correction should be considered is in well-compensated metabolic acidosis with impending respira Continue reading >>

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  1. Timothy

    I recently told my friend, a professor of medicine at a large university, about my six-week-old PB eating habits (now largely carnivorous). He advised me that it's not good to keep your body "carb-starved" and in ketosis all the time, and that eating so much protein strains the liver's ability to produce urea and the kidneys' ability to process and excrete it. The long-term effects can include liver and kidney damage, he said.
    I've heard something like this before, but it seems to run counter to the research on MDA as well as the experiences of real-life carnivores.
    Do you know anyone who has sustained kidney/liver damage from eating too much protein? Is Tarlach on course for renal failure? Or is this just CW run amok again?

  2. Athena

    1
    Ive heard it from bodybuilders who eat ungodly amounts of protein (mostly from powders) that they have kidney problems. I always heard as long as you keep hydrated your kidneys shouldnt have an issue, especially if u get your protein from meat sources. Although I can't back that up with anything other than broscience. Im interested to see some evidence though

  3. Prowler

    1
    Absolute bull.
    1. What is the incidence of liver or kidney damage among the Inuit practicing their traditional diet?
    2. What is the incidence of liver or kidney damage among the Masai practicing their traditional diet?
    3. The venerable Dr. Atkins himself used ketosis to treat thousands of patients at his clinic over the course of several decades, and he challenged anyone to show one case where ketosis caused kidney damage. Not one case has ever been documented.
    Case closed. Ketosis is a safe and natural state, and any speculation about potential harm is just that: pure unfounded speculation.

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What is ALKALOSIS? What does ALKALOSIS mean? ALKALOSIS meaning - ALKALOSIS pronunciation - ALKALOSIS definition - ALKALOSIS explanation - How to pronounce ALKALOSIS? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Alkalosis is the result of a process reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia). In contrast to acidemia (serum pH 7.35 or lower), alkalemia occurs when the serum pH is higher than normal (7.45 or higher). Alkalosis is usually divided into the categories of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic alkalosis or a combined respiratory/metabolic alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation, resulting in a loss of carbon dioxide. Compensatory mechanisms for this would include increased dissociation of the carbonic acid buffering intermediate into hydrogen ions, and the related excretion of bicarbonate, both of which lower blood pH. Hyperventilation-induced alkalosis can be seen in several deadly central nervous system diseases such as strokes or Rett syndrome. Metabolic alkalosis can be caused by rep

Acidosis And Alkalosis | Harrison's Principles Of Internal Medicine, 19e | Accessmedicine | Mcgraw-hill Medical

Systemic arterial pH is maintained between 7.35 and 7.45 by extracellular and intracellular chemical buffering together with respiratory and renal regulatory mechanisms. The control of arterial CO2 tension (Paco2) by the central nervous system (CNS) and respiratory system and the control of plasma bicarbonate by the kidneys stabilize the arterial pH by excretion or retention of acid or alkali. The metabolic and respiratory components that regulate systemic pH are described by the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation: Under most circumstances, CO2 production and excretion are matched, and the usual steady-state Paco2 is maintained at 40 mmHg. Underexcretion of CO2 produces hypercapnia, and overexcretion causes hypocapnia. Nevertheless, production and excretion are again matched at a new steady-state Paco2. Therefore, the Paco2 is regulated primarily by neural respiratory factors and is not subject to regulation by the rate of CO2 production. Hypercapnia is usually the result of hypoventilation rather than of increased CO2 production. Increases or decreases in Paco2 represent derangements of neural respiratory control or are due to compensatory changes in response to a primary alteration Continue reading >>

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  1. GMX

    I've been ketoing now almost 5 weeks but have been struggling to get my fasting blood glucose down. This morning my blood ketones registered at .8 but my blood glucose was 122. I'm eating about 90-100g protein a day but I weigh 217. Is it still just too much protein? Carb intake is negligible. Fat intake is probably 250g a day. Any thoughts? Thanks.

  2. Mare

    For your weight, that does not seem like a lot of protein to me. I weigh 145, and I've calculated my minimum protein at 60g and can go as high as 100g.
    As to blood glucose, there's a phenomenon with ketosis where fasting BG is elevated, but it is benign. Peter at Hyperlipid had a post on his blog some time ago that provided the science behind this, but I could not follow it. This may be what you're experiencing.

    My endo told me that this is true, and he goes by my A1C rather than my fasting because of this.

  3. carolT

    Protein could be lower if you are female (sorry, can't tell) and/or not exercising, but the ketone level indicates you are accessing some fat overnight.

    Have you taken glucose readings at night or before your main meal? Are they lower? You may be experiencing "dawn phenomenon" where glucose is higher in the morning because 1.) the same hormones that wake you up also give you some extra glucose to start the day or 2.) your glucose dropped overnight and your body reacts by making more of it. Also, if you happen to get up in the middle of the night, you could see what your glucose is doing before your normal waking time.

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What is HYPOKALEMIA? What does HYPOKALEMIA mean? HYPOKALEMIA meaning - HYPOKALEMIA pronunciation - HYPOKALEMIA definition - HYPOKALEMIA explanation - How to pronounce HYPOKALEMIA? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Hypokalemia, also spelled hypokalaemia, is a low level of potassium (K+) in the blood serum. Normal potassium levels are between 3.5 and 5.0 mmol/L (3.5 and 5.0 mEq/L) with levels below 3.5 mmol/L defined as hypokalemia. Mildly low levels do not typically cause symptoms. Symptoms may include feeling tired, leg cramps, weakness, and constipation. It increases the risk of an abnormal heart rhythm such as bradycardia and cardiac arrest. Causes of hypokalemia include diarrhea, medications like furosemide and steroids, dialysis, diabetes insipidus, hyperaldosteronism, hypomagnesemia, and not enough intake in the diet. It is classified as severe when levels are less than 2.5 mmol/L. Low levels can also be detected on an electrocardiogram (ECG). Hyperkalemia refers to a high level of potassium in the blood serum. The speed at which potassium should be replaced depends on whether or not there are symptoms or ECG changes

Attending Rounds: Patient With Hypokalemia And Metabolic Acidosis

Attending Rounds: Patient with Hypokalemia and Metabolic Acidosis Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Dr. Asghar Rastegar, Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, 1074 LMP, P.O. Box 208030, New Haven, CT 06520-8030; Phone: 203-737-2078, Fax: 203-785-7030; E-mail: . Summary Hypokalemic paralysis represents a medical emergency requiring both rapid diagnosis and treatment. In this Attending Rounds a patient with hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis is presented to emphasize the role of routine laboratory studies in the assessment of such patients so that a correct diagnosis can be made and appropriate treatment can be initiated promptly. A 39-year-old woman who had been in excellent health presented with a chief complaint of weakness in her lower extremities. She gave a history of intermittent vomiting for the past 2 months that was worse over the past 3 days. Two weeks before admission she was found to be positive for Helicobacter pylori antigen and was treated with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and lansoperazole. One day before admission she was seen in the emergency department complaining of 3 days of vomiting. The serum Continue reading >>

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  1. emberleo

    Hi guys this may be tmi but I just want to see what I can do to fix it or what I'm doing wrong. I'm closing out my 3rd week on this diet and the last couple of days I've had the real strong urine smell from ketosis and rash like symptoms. Am I not drinking enough water potentially? Or eating too much protein potentially? I'm not feeling too well. I feel a bit weighed down with acid. Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. Art3mis

    the urine smell will pass (or maybe i do not notice it as much YEEP!)....the rash i can not speak to, however, could be just the stress your body is going through while it adjusts, OR it could be your sensitive to something in the IP packets, OR it could be not related at all.
    a few questions...
    how much water are you drinking?
    where is the rash? all over, certain places? does anything make it go away, or is it always there?
    have you ever had your Blood sugar tested? if so, how long ago?
    describe the "not feeling too well"....while your body is adjusting you will feel like poop but its kinda certain symptoms...so what are yours?

  3. Jez

    What does weighed down with acid mean?

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