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Metabolic Acidosis Treatment Guidelines Pdf

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesn’t cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management

Metabolic Acidosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management

Abstract | Metabolic acidosis is characterized by a primary reduction in serum bicarbonate (HCO3 concentration, a secondary decrease in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) of ~1 mmHg for concentration, and a reduction in blood pH. Acute forms (lasting minutes to several days) and chronic forms (lasting weeks to years) of the disorder can occur, for which the underlying cause/s and resulting adverse effects may differ. Acute forms of metabolic acidosis most frequently result from the overproduction of organic acids such as ketoacids or lactic acid; by contrast, chronic metabolic acidosis often reflects bicarbonate wasting and/or impaired renal acidification. The calculation of the serum ] + [Cl]), aids diagnosis by classifying the disorders into categories of normal (hyperchloremic) anion gap or elevated anion gap. These categories can overlap, however. Adverse effects of acute metabolic acidosis primarily include decreased cardiac output, arterial dilatation with hypotension, altered oxygen delivery, decreased ATP production, predisposition to arrhythmias, and impairment of the immune response. The main adverse effects of chronic metabolic acidosis are increased muscle degradation and abnormal bone metabolism. Using base to treat acute metabolic acidosis is controversial because of a lack of definitive benefit and because of potential complications. By contrast, the administration of base for the treatment of chronic metabolic acidosis is associated with improved cellular Kraut, J. A. & Madias, N. E. Nat. Rev. Nephrol. 6, 274285 (2010); publshed online 23 March 2010; doi:10.1038/nrneph.2010.33 Metabolic acidosis is characterized by a primary reduc- tion in the serum concentration of bicarbonate (HCO3 a secon dary decrease in the arterial partial pre Continue reading >>

Prolonged Resuscitation Of Metabolic Acidosis After Trauma Is Associated With More Complications

Prolonged Resuscitation Of Metabolic Acidosis After Trauma Is Associated With More Complications

Prolonged resuscitation of metabolic acidosis after trauma is associated with more complications Optimal patterns for fluid management are controversial in the resuscitation of major trauma. Similarly, appropriate surgical timing is often unclear in orthopedic polytrauma. Early appropriate care (EAC) has recently been introduced as an objective model to determine readiness for surgery based on the resuscitation of metabolic acidosis. EAC is an objective treatment algorithm that recommends fracture fixation within 36h when either lactate <4.0mmol/L, pH 7.25, or base excess (BE) 5.5mmol/L. The aim of this study is to better characterize the relationship between post-operative complications and the time required for resuscitation of metabolic acidosis using EAC. At an adult level 1 trauma center, 332 patients with major trauma (Injury Severity Score (ISS) 16) were prospectively treated with EAC. The time from injury to EAC resuscitation was determined in all patients. Age, race, gender, ISS, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), body mass index (BMI), outside hospital transfer status, number of fractures, and the specific fractures were also reviewed. Complications in the 6-month post-operative period were adjudicated by an independent multidisciplinary committee of trauma physicians and included infection, sepsis, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, renal failure, multiorgan failure, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Univariate analysis and binomial logistic regression analysis were used to compare complications between groups. Sixty-six patients developed complications, which was less than a historical cohort of 1,441 patients (19.9% vs. 22.1%). ISS (p < 0.0005) and time to EAC resuscitation (p = 0.041) were independent predictors Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

85 Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the most frequent hyperglycaemic acute diabetic complication. Furthermore it carries a significant risk of death, which can be prevented by early and effective management. All physicians, irrespective of the discipline they are working in and whether in primary, secondary or tertiary care institutions, should be able to recognise DKA early and initiate management immediately. 86 Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common complication of diabetes with an annual occurrence rate of 46 to 50 per 10 000 diabetic patients. The severity of this acute diabetic complication can be appreciated from the high death-to-case ratio of 5 to 10%.1 In Africa the mortality of DKA is unacceptably high with a reported death rate of 26 to 29% in studies from Kenya, Tanzania and Ghana.2 It is a complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, although more commonly seen in type 1 diabetic patients. Of known diabetic patients presenting with DKA about one-quarter will be patients with type 2 diabetes. In patients presenting with a DKA as first manifestation of diabetes about 15% will be type 2.3 This correlates well with data from South Africa suggesting that one- quarter of patients with DKA will be type 2 with adequate C-peptide levels and the absence of anti-GAD antibodies.4 This review will focus on the principles of diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of DKA, with special mention of new developments and controversial issues. Clinical features DKA evolves over hours to days in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients, but the symptoms of poor control of blood glucose are usually present for several days before the onset or presentation of ketoacidosis.5 The clinical features of DKA are non-specific and patients may present with Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. See also separate Lactic Acidosis and Arterial Blood Gases - Indications and Interpretations articles. Description Metabolic acidosis is defined as an arterial blood pH <7.35 with plasma bicarbonate <22 mmol/L. Respiratory compensation occurs normally immediately, unless there is respiratory pathology. Pure metabolic acidosis is a term used to describe when there is not another primary acid-base derangement - ie there is not a mixed acid-base disorder. Compensation may be partial (very early in time course, limited by other acid-base derangements, or the acidosis exceeds the maximum compensation possible) or full. The Winter formula can be helpful here - the formula allows calculation of the expected compensating pCO2: If the measured pCO2 is >expected pCO2 then additional respiratory acidosis may also be present. It is important to remember that metabolic acidosis is not a diagnosis; rather, it is a metabolic derangement that indicates underlying disease(s) as a cause. Determination of the underlying cause is the key to correcting the acidosis and administering appropriate therapy[1]. Epidemiology It is relatively common, particularly among acutely unwell/critical care patients. There are no reliable figures for its overall incidence or prevalence in the population at large. Causes of metabolic acidosis There are many causes. They can be classified according to their pathophysiological origin, as below. The table is not exhaustive but lists those that are most common or clinically important to detect. Increased acid Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Acute non-anion gap metabolic acidosis, also termed hyperchloremic acidosis, is frequently detected in seriously ill patients. The most common mechanisms leading to this acid–base disorder include loss of large quantities of base secondary to diarrhea and administration of large quantities of chloride-containing solutions in the treatment of hypovolemia and various shock states. The resultant acidic milieu can cause cellular dysfunction and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. The associated change in the chloride concentration in the distal tubule lumen might also play a role in reducing the glomerular filtration rate. Administration of base is often recommended for the treatment of acute non-anion gap acidosis. Importantly, the blood pH and/or serum bicarbonate concentration to guide the initiation of treatment has not been established for this type of metabolic acidosis; and most clinicians use guidelines derived from studies of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Therapeutic complications resulting from base administration such as volume overload, exacerbation of hypertension and reduction in ionized calcium are likely to be as common as with high anion gap metabolic acidosis. On the other hand, exacerbation of intracellular acidosis due to the excessive generation of carbon dioxide might be less frequent than in high anion gap metabolic acidosis because of better tissue perfusion and the ability to eliminate carbon dioxide. Further basic and clinical research is needed to facilitate development of evidence-based guidelines for therapy of this important and increasingly common acid–base disorder. Introduction Acute metabolic acidosis (defined temporally as lasting minutes to a few days) has traditionally been divided into two major categories based on the level Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Metabolic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Treatment of acute metabolic acidosis by alkali therapy is usually indicated to raise and maintain the plasma pH to greater than 7.20. In the following two circumstances this is particularly important. When the serum pH is below 7.20, a continued fall in the serum HCO3- level may result in a significant drop in pH. This is especially true when the PCO2 is close to the lower limit of compensation, which in an otherwise healthy young individual is approximately 15 mm Hg. With increasing age and other complicating illnesses, the limit of compensation is likely to be less. A further small drop in HCO3- at this point thus is not matched by a corresponding fall in PaCO2, and rapid decompensation can occur. For example, in a patient with metabolic acidosis with a serum HCO3- level of 9 mEq/L and a maximally compensated PCO2 of 20 mm Hg, a drop in the serum HCO3- level to 7 mEq/L results in a change in pH from 7.28 to 7.16. A second situation in which HCO3- correction should be considered is in well-compensated metabolic acidosis with impending respiratory failure. As metabolic acidosis continues in some patients, the increased ventilatory drive to lower the PaCO2 may not be sustainable because of respiratory muscle fatigue. In this situation, a PaCO2 that starts to rise may change the plasma pH dramatically even without a significant further fall in HCO3-. For example, in a patient with metabolic acidosis with a serum HCO3- level of 15 and a compensated PaCO2 of 27 mm Hg, a rise in PaCO2 to 37 mm Hg results in a change in pH from 7.33 to 7.20. A further rise of the PaCO2 to 43 mm Hg drops the pH to 7.14. All of this would have occurred while the serum HCO3- level remained at 15 mEq/L. In lactic acidosis and diabetic ketoacidosis, the organic anion can r Continue reading >>

Acid-base Balance And Metabolic Acidosis In Neonates

Acid-base Balance And Metabolic Acidosis In Neonates

Your browser does not support the NLM PubReader view. Go to this page to see a list of supporting browsers. Acid-base Balance and Metabolic Acidosis in Neonates J Korean Soc Neonatol. 2010 Nov;17(2):155-160. J Korean Soc Neonatol. 2010 Nov;17(2):155-160. Korean. Published online November 30, 2010. Copyright 2010 by the Korean Society of Neonatology Acid-base Balance and Metabolic Acidosis in Neonates Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Correspondence to Byong Sop Lee, M.D., Ph.D. Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Poongnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736, Korea. Tel: +82-2-3010-3929, Fax: +82-2-3010-6978, Email: [email protected] Received October 25, 2010; Accepted November 18, 2010. This article has been cited by GoogleScholar. Metabolic acidosis is commonly encountered issues in the management of critically ill neonates and especially of preterm infants during early neonatal days. In extremely premature infants, low glomerular filtration rate and immaturity of renal tubules to produce new bicarbonate causes renal bicarbonate loss. Higher intake of amino acids, relatively greater contribution of protein to the energy metabolism and mineralization process in growing bones are also responsible for higher acid load in premature infant than in adult. Despite widespread use of sodium bicarbonate in the management of severe metabolic acidosis, use of sodium bicarbonate in premature infants should be restricted to a reasonable but unproven exception such as ongoing renal loss. Despite concern about the low pH value (<7.2) which can compromise cellular metabolic function, no treatment guideline has been established regarding the management of Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Metabolic Acidosis In Patients With Ckd

Treatment Of Metabolic Acidosis In Patients With Ckd

Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Patients With CKD We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Patients With CKD Wei Chen, MD and Matthew K. Abramowitz, MD, MS Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease and believed to contribute to a number of sequelae, including bone disease, altered protein metabolism, skeletal muscle wasting, and progressive GFR loss. Small trials in animal models and humans suggest a role for alkali therapy to lessen these complications. Recent studies support this notion, although more definitive evidence is needed on the long-term benefits of alkali therapy and the optimal serum bicarbonate level. The role of dietary modification should also be given greater consideration. In addition, potential adverse effects of alkali treatment must be taken into consideration, including sodium retention and the theoretical concern of promoting vascular calcification. This teaching case summarizes the rationale for and the benefits and complications of base therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease. Index Words: metabolic acidosis, chronic kidney disease, bicarbonate, alkali therapy Metabolic acidosis is associated with many of the complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD), including bone disease, muscle protein catabolism, and progressive glomerular filtration rate (GFR) loss. The Kidney Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) guideline Continue reading >>

7.6 Metabolic Alkalosis - Correction

7.6 Metabolic Alkalosis - Correction

Correct the primary cause of the disorder Correct those factors which maintain the disorder (esp chloride administrationin the common Cl- deficient cases) Repletion of chloride, potassium and ECF volume will promote renal bicarbonate excretion and return plasma bicarbonate to normal. Chloride administration 1 is essential for correction of chloride-depletion metabolic alkalosis and the alkalosis can be corrected with chloride even if volume depletion persists. Because of electroneutrality requirements it is not possible to give chloride alone, so 'giving chloride' is equivalent to 'giving saline' in most cases. (One exception to this is giving a dilute HCl infusion -see below) Volume administration will not correct the alkalosis unless the administered fluid contains chloride. This is not difficult though as all available ECF replacement fluids contain chloride so administering these IV fluids to correct the volume deficiency must necessarily replenish chloride. Maintenance IV fluids (eg 5% dextrose) are poor at replenishing IV volume and contain little or no chloride; they are not useful for this correction and should not be used. Mineralocorticoid excess causes renal potassium wasting. This can maintain a metabolic alkalosis even in the absence of chloride depletion. Rarely, it may be advantageous to institute treatments (eg HCl infusion; acetazolamide) that can return the bicarbonate level to normal more quickly. Rarely, it may be advantageous to institute treatments (hydrochloric acid infusion, or acetazolamide) that can return the bicarbonate level to normal more quickly. These are not routine components of management, and should not deflect attention from correcting the primary cause and from correcting a chloride deficiency, but may be useful for occasional pati Continue reading >>

Payperview: Metabolic Acidosis And Protein Catabolism: Mechanisms And Clinical Implications - Karger Publishers

Payperview: Metabolic Acidosis And Protein Catabolism: Mechanisms And Clinical Implications - Karger Publishers

I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree. Metabolic acidosis increases protein degradation resulting in muscle wasting and a negative nitrogen balance. The branched-chain amino acids serve as useful markers of these changes and their catabolism is increased in acidosis, particularly for the spontaneous acidosis associated with renal failure. As a result, the neutral nitrogen balance is compromised and malnutrition results. Glucocorticoids mediate these changes through the recently discovered ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Therapy necessitates correction of the underlying acidosis either through adjustment of the alkalinity of the dialysate for the patient on dialysis or through dietary protein restriction and sodium bicarbonate supplements for the predialysis patient. Bright R: Reports of medical cases selected with a view to illustrating the symptoms and cure of diseases by a reference to morbid anatomy. London, Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown and Green, vol2, 1831. Lyon DM, Dunlop DM, Stewart CP: The alkaline treatment of chronic nephritis. Lancet 1931;2:10091113. Blom van Assendelf PM, Dorhout Mees EJ: Urea metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure: Influence of sodium bicarbonate or sodium chloride administration. Metabolism 1970;19:10531063. Papadoyannakis NJ, Stefanidis CJ, McGeown M: The effect of the correction of metabolic acidosis on nitrogen and potassium balance of patients with chronic renal failure. Am J Clin Nutr 1984;40:623627. McSherry E, Morris RC Jr: Attainment of normal stature with alkali therapy in infants and children with classic renal tubular acidosis. J Clin Invest 1978;61:509514. May RC, Hara Y, Kelly RA, et al: Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: Abnormal regulation in acidosis. Am J Physiol 1987; Continue reading >>

Blood Gas Analysis--insight Into The Acid-base Status Of The Patient

Blood Gas Analysis--insight Into The Acid-base Status Of The Patient

Acid-Base Physiology Buffers H+ A- HCO3- CO2 Buffers H+ A- CO2 Cells Blood Kidney Lungs Fluids, Electrolytes, and Acid-Base Status in Critical Illness Blood Gas Analysis--Insight into the Acid-Base status of the Patient The blood gas consists of pH-negative log of the Hydrogen ion concentration: -log[H+]. (also, pH=pK+log [HCO3]/ 0.03 x pCO2). The pH is always a product of two components, respiratory and metabolic, and the metabolic component is judged, calculated, or computed by allowing for the effect of the pCO2, ie, any change in the pH unexplained by the pCO2 indicates a metabolic abnormality. CO +H 0ºº H CO ººHCO + H2 2 2 3 3 - + CO2 and water form carbonic acid or H2CO3, which is in equilibrium with bicarbonate (HCO3-)and hydrogen ions (H+). A change in the concentration of the reactants on either side of the equation affects the subsequent direction of the reaction. For example, an increase in CO2 will result in increased carbonic acid formation (H2CO3) which leads to an increase in both HCO3- and H+ (\pH). Normally, at pH 7.4, a ratio of one part carbonic acid to twenty parts bicarbonate is present in the extracellular fluid [HCO3-/H2CO3]=20. A change in the ratio will affect the pH of the fluid. If both components change (ie, with chronic compensation), the pH may be normal, but the other components will not. pCO -partial pressure of carbon dioxide. Hypoventilation or hyperventilation (ie, minute2 ventilation--tidal volume x respitatory rate--imperfectly matched to physiologic demands) will lead to elevation or depression, respectively, in the pCO2. V/Q (ventilation/perfusion) mismatch does not usually lead to abnormalities in PCO2 because of the linear nature of the CO2 elimination curve (ie, good lung units can make up for bad lung units). Diffus Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis is a condition that occurs when the body produces excessive quantities of acid or when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. If unchecked, metabolic acidosis leads to acidemia, i.e., blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of hydrogen ions by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3−) in the kidney. Its causes are diverse, and its consequences can be serious, including coma and death. Together with respiratory acidosis, it is one of the two general causes of acidemia. Terminology : Acidosis refers to a process that causes a low pH in blood and tissues. Acidemia refers specifically to a low pH in the blood. In most cases, acidosis occurs first for reasons explained below. Free hydrogen ions then diffuse into the blood, lowering the pH. Arterial blood gas analysis detects acidemia (pH lower than 7.35). When acidemia is present, acidosis is presumed. Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms are not specific, and diagnosis can be difficult unless the patient presents with clear indications for arterial blood gas sampling. Symptoms may include chest pain, palpitations, headache, altered mental status such as severe anxiety due to hypoxia, decreased visual acuity, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, altered appetite and weight gain, muscle weakness, bone pain, and joint pain. Those in metabolic acidosis may exhibit deep, rapid breathing called Kussmaul respirations which is classically associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Rapid deep breaths increase the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled, thus lowering the serum carbon dioxide levels, resulting in some degree of compensation. Overcompensation via respiratory alkalosis to form an alkalemia does not occur. Extreme acidemia leads to neurological and cardia Continue reading >>

Pathogenesis, Consequences, And Treatment Of Metabolic Acidosis In Chronic Kidney Disease

Pathogenesis, Consequences, And Treatment Of Metabolic Acidosis In Chronic Kidney Disease

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2018 UpToDate, Inc. All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete. INTRODUCTION — Most individuals produce approximately 15,000 mmol (considerably more with exercise) of carbon dioxide and 50 to 100 meq of nonvolatile acid each day. Acid-base balance is maintained by normal elimination of carbon dioxide by the lungs (which affects the partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PCO2]) and normal excretion of nonvolatile acid by the kidneys (which affects the plasma bicarbonate concentration). The hydrogen ion concentration of the blood is determined by the ratio of the PCO2 and plasma bicarbonate concentration. (See "Simple and mixed acid-base disorders", section on 'Introduction'.) Acidosis associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) will be discussed in this topic. An overview of simple acid-base disorders and renal tubular acidosis, as well as the approach to patients with metabolic acidosis, are presented elsewhere. (See "Simple and mixed acid-base disorders" and "Overview and pathophysiology of renal tubular acidosis and the effect on potassium balance" and "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis" and "Approach to the child with metabolic acidosis".) ACID-BASE BALANCE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE — Acid-base balance is normally maintained by the renal excretion of the daily acid load (about 1 meq/kg per day, derived mostly from the generation of sulfuric acid during the metabolism of sulf Continue reading >>

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