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Metabolic Acidosis Shock

Hemodynamic Consequences Of Severe Lactic Acidosis In Shock States: From Bench To Bedside

Hemodynamic Consequences Of Severe Lactic Acidosis In Shock States: From Bench To Bedside

Hemodynamic consequences of severe lactic acidosis in shock states: from bench to bedside Antoine Kimmoun , Emmanuel Novy , Thomas Auchet , Nicolas Ducrocq , and Bruno Levy CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, 54000 France INSERM U1116, Groupe Choc, Facult de Mdecine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, 54000 France CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, 54000 France INSERM U1116, Groupe Choc, Facult de Mdecine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, 54000 France INSERM U1116, Groupe Choc, Facult de Mdecine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, 54511 France Antoine Kimmoun, Email: [email protected] . Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright Kimmoun et al.; licensee BioMed Central. 2015 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: Background, Etiology, Epidemiology

Lactic Acidosis: Background, Etiology, Epidemiology

Author: Kyle J Gunnerson, MD; Chief Editor: Michael R Pinsky, MD, CM, Dr(HC), FCCP, MCCM more... In basic terms, lactic acid is the normal endpoint of the anaerobic breakdown of glucose in the tissues. The lactate exits the cells and is transported to the liver, where it is oxidized back to pyruvate and ultimately converted to glucose via the Cori cycle. In the setting of decreased tissue oxygenation, lactic acid is produced as the anaerobic cycle is utilized for energy production. With a persistent oxygen debt and overwhelming of the body's buffering abilities (whether from chronic dysfunction or excessive production), lactic acidosis ensues. [ 1 , 2 ] (See Etiology.) Lactic acid exists in 2 optical isomeric forms, L-lactate and D-lactate. L-lactate is the most commonly measured level, as it is the only form produced in human metabolism. Its excess represents increased anaerobic metabolism due to tissue hypoperfusion. (See Workup.) D-lactate is a byproduct of bacterial metabolism and may accumulate in patients with short-gut syndrome or in those with a history of gastric bypass or small-bowel resection. [ 3 ] By the turn of the 20th century, many physicians recognized that patients who are critically ill could exhibit metabolic acidosis unaccompanied by elevation of ketones or other measurable anions. In 1925, Clausen identified the accumulation of lactic acid in blood as a cause of acid-base disorder. Several decades later, Huckabee's seminal work firmly established that lactic acidosis frequently accompanies severe illnesses and that tissue hypoperfusion underlies the pathogenesis. In their classic 1976 monograph, Cohen and Woods classified the causes of lactic acidosis according to the presence or absence of adequate tissue oxygenation. (See Presentationand Differe Continue reading >>

Combined Respiratory And Metabolic Acidosis Caused By Bronchospasm In Anaphylactic Shock

Combined Respiratory And Metabolic Acidosis Caused By Bronchospasm In Anaphylactic Shock

Zieliński J. · Koziorowski A. From the Department of Internal Medicine (Prof. Dr. B. Jochweds) and Department of Pathophysiology (Dr. A. Koziorowski), Institute of Tuberculosis, Warszawa Authors’ address: Dr. Jan Zielinski and Dr. Antoni Koziorowski, Instytut Gruzlicy, Klinika Chorób Wewnetrznych, Plocka 26, Warszawa (Poland) Continue reading >>

Defining Metabolic Acidosis In Patients With Septic Shock Using Stewart Approach - Sciencedirect

Defining Metabolic Acidosis In Patients With Septic Shock Using Stewart Approach - Sciencedirect

Volume 30, Issue 3 , March 2012, Pages 391-398 Defining metabolic acidosis in patients with septic shock using Stewart approach Author links open overlay panel JihadMallatMD The aim of this study was to define the nature of metabolic acidosis in patients with septic shock on admission to intensive care unit (ICU) using Stewart method. We also aimed to compare the ability of standard base excess (SBE), anion gap (AG), and corrected AG for albumin and lactate (AGcorr) to accurately predict the presence of unmeasured anions (UA). Thirty consecutive patients with septic shock were prospectively included on ICU admission. Stewart equations modified by Figge were used to calculate the strong ion difference and the strong ion gap (SIG). Most patients had multiple underlying mechanisms explaining the metabolic acidosis. Unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia were present in 70% of the patients. Increased UA were present in 23% of patients with normal values of SBE and [HCO3]. In these patients, plasma [Cl] was significantly lower compared with patients with low SBE and increased UA (103 [102-106.6] vs 108 [106-111] mmol/L; P = .01, respectively). Corrected AG for albumin and lactate had the best correlation with SIG (r = 0.94; P < .0001) with good agreement (bias, 0, and precision, 1.22) and highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.995; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-1) to discriminate SIG acidosis. Patients with septic shock exhibit a complex metabolic acidosis at ICU admission. High UA may be present with normal values of SBE and [HCO3] as a result of associated relative hypochloremic alkalosis. Corrected AG for albumin and lactate offers the most accurate bedside alternative to Stewart calculation of UA. Choose an option to locate/access this article: Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

For acidosis referring to acidity of the urine, see renal tubular acidosis. "Acidemia" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Academia. Acidosis is a process causing increased acidity in the blood and other body tissues (i.e., an increased hydrogen ion concentration). If not further qualified, it usually refers to acidity of the blood plasma. The term acidemia describes the state of low blood pH, while acidosis is used to describe the processes leading to these states. Nevertheless, the terms are sometimes used interchangeably. The distinction may be relevant where a patient has factors causing both acidosis and alkalosis, wherein the relative severity of both determines whether the result is a high, low, or normal pH. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH falls below 7.35 (except in the fetus – see below), while its counterpart (alkalosis) occurs at a pH over 7.45. Arterial blood gas analysis and other tests are required to separate the main causes. The rate of cellular metabolic activity affects and, at the same time, is affected by the pH of the body fluids. In mammals, the normal pH of arterial blood lies between 7.35 and 7.50 depending on the species (e.g., healthy human-arterial blood pH varies between 7.35 and 7.45). Blood pH values compatible with life in mammals are limited to a pH range between 6.8 and 7.8. Changes in the pH of arterial blood (and therefore the extracellular fluid) outside this range result in irreversible cell damage.[1] Signs and symptoms[edit] General symptoms of acidosis.[2] These usually accompany symptoms of another primary defect (respiratory or metabolic). Nervous system involvement may be seen with acidosis and occurs more often with respiratory acidosis than with metabolic acidosis. Signs and symptoms that may be seen i Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Description Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis due to the inadequate clearance of lactic acid from the blood. Lactate is a byproduct of anaerobic respiration and is normally cleared from the blood by the liver, kidney and skeletal muscle. Lactic acidosis occurs when the body's buffering systems are overloaded and tends to cause a pH of ≤7.25 with plasma lactate ≥5 mmol/L. It is usually caused by a state of tissue hypoperfusion and/or hypoxia. This causes pyruvic acid to be preferentially converted to lactate during anaerobic respiration. Hyperlactataemia is defined as plasma lactate >2 mmol/L. Classification Cohen and Woods devised the following system in 1976 and it is still widely used:[1] Type A: lactic acidosis occurs with clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. Type B: lactic acidosis occurs without clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. It is further subdivided into: Type B1: due to underlying disease. Type B2: due to effects of drugs or toxins. Type B3: due to inborn or acquired errors of metabolism. Epidemiology The prevalence is very difficult to estimate, as it occurs in critically ill patients, who are not often suitable subjects for research. It is certainly a common occurrence in patients in high-dependency areas of hospitals.[2] The incidence of symptomatic hyperlactataemia appears to be rising as a consequence of the use of antiretroviral therapy to treat HIV infection. It appears to increase in those taking stavudine (d4T) regimens.[3] Causes of lactic acid Continue reading >>

Mortality And The Nature Of Metabolic Acidosis In Children With Shock

Mortality And The Nature Of Metabolic Acidosis In Children With Shock

, Volume 29, Issue2 , pp 286291 | Cite as Mortality and the nature of metabolic acidosis in children with shock Mortality in children with shock is more closely related to the nature, rather than the magnitude (base deficit/excess), of a metabolic acidosis. To examine the relationship between base excess (BE), hyperlactataemia, hyperchloraemia, 'unmeasured' strong anions, and mortality. Prospective observational study set in a multi-disciplinary Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Forty-six children, median age 6months (1.514.4), median weight 5kg (3.28.8), admitted to PICU with shock. Predicted mortality was calculated from the paediatric index of mortality (PIM) score. The pH, base excess, serum lactate, corrected chloride, and 'unmeasured' strong anions (Strong Ion Gap) were measured or calculated at admission and 24h. Observed mortality (n=16) was 35%, with a standardised mortality ratio (SMR) of 1.03 (95% CI 0.711.35). There was no significant difference in admission pH or BE between survivors and nonsurvivors. There was no association between elevation of 'unmeasured' anions and mortality, although there was a trend towards hyperchloraemia in survivors (P=0.08). Admission lactate was higher in nonsurvivors (median 11.6 vs 3.3mmol/l; P=0.0003). Area under the mortality receiver operating characteristic curve for lactate was 0.83 (955 CI 0.700.95), compared to 0.71 (95% CI 0.530.88) for the PIM score. Admission lactate level >5mmol/l had maximum diagnostic efficiency for mortality, with a likelihood ratio of 2.0. There is no association between the magnitude of metabolic acidosis, quantified by the base excess, and mortality in children with shock. Hyperlactataemia, but not elevation of 'unmeasured' anions, is predictive of a poor outcome. MortalityMetabolic aci Continue reading >>

The Use Of Sodium Bicarbonate In The Treatment Of Acidosis In Sepsis: A Literature Update On A Long Term Debate

The Use Of Sodium Bicarbonate In The Treatment Of Acidosis In Sepsis: A Literature Update On A Long Term Debate

Volume2015(2015), Article ID605830, 7 pages The Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in the Treatment of Acidosis in Sepsis: A Literature Update on a Long Term Debate 1Internal Medicine Department, University Hospital of Patras, 26500 Rion, Greece 2University of Patras School of Medicine, 26500 Rion, Greece 3Intensive Care Department, Brugmann University Hospital, 1030 Brussels, Belgium 4Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA Received 22 March 2015; Revised 29 June 2015; Accepted 1 July 2015 Copyright 2015 Dimitrios Velissaris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Introduction. Sepsis and its consequences such as metabolic acidosis are resulting in increased mortality. Although correction of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate seems a reasonable approach, there is ongoing debate regarding the role of bicarbonates as a therapeutic option. Methods. We conducted a PubMed literature search in order to identify published literature related to the effects of sodium bicarbonate treatment on metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. The search included all articles published in English in the last 35 years. Results. There is ongoing debate regarding the use of bicarbonates for the treatment of acidosis in sepsis, but there is a trend towards not using bicarbonate in sepsis patients with arterial blood gas . Conclusions. Routine use of bicarbonate for treatment of severe acidemia and lactic acidosis due to sepsis is subject of controversy, and current opinion does not favor routine use of bicarbonates. However, available evidence is inconclusive, and Continue reading >>

Sepsis And Septic Shock

Sepsis And Septic Shock

(Video) How To Do Defibrillation In An Adult By Paul M. Maggio, MD, MBA, Associate Professor of Surgery, Associate Chief Medical Officer, and Co-Director, Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center Sepsis is a clinical syndrome of life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated response to infection. In septic shock, there is critical reduction in tissue perfusion; acute failure of multiple organs, including the lungs, kidneys, and liver, can occur. Common causes in immunocompetent patients include many different species of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Immunocompromised patients may have uncommon bacterial or fungal species as a cause. Signs include fever, hypotension, oliguria, and confusion. Diagnosis is primarily clinical combined with culture results showing infection; early recognition and treatment is critical. Treatment is aggressive fluid resuscitation, antibiotics, surgical excision of infected or necrotic tissue and drainage of pus, and supportive care. Sepsis represents a spectrum of disease with mortality risk ranging from moderate (eg, 10%) to substantial (eg, > 40%) depending on various pathogen and host factors along with the timeliness of recognition and provision of appropriate treatment. Septic shock is a subset of sepsis with significantly increased mortality due to severe abnormalities of circulation and/or cellular metabolism. Septic shock involves persistent hypotension (defined as the need for vasopressors to maintain mean arterial pressure 65 mm Hg, and a serum lactate level > 18 mg/dL [2 mmol/L] despite adequate volume resuscitation [1] ). The concept of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), defined by certain abnormalities of vital signs and laboratory results, has long been used to identi Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Metabolic Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

The Terrible Effects of Acid Acid corrosion is a well-known fact. Acid rain can peel the paint off of a car. Acidifying ocean water bleaches and destroys coral reefs. Acid can burn a giant hole through metal. It can also burn holes, called cavities, into your teeth. I think I've made my point. Acid, regardless of where it's at, is going to hurt. And when your body is full of acid, then it's going to destroy your fragile, soft, internal organs even more quickly than it can destroy your bony teeth and chunks of thick metal. What Is Metabolic Acidosis? The condition that fills your body with proportionately too much acid is known as metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis refers to a physiological state characterized by an increase in the amount of acid produced or ingested by the body, the decreased renal excretion of acid, or bicarbonate loss from the body. Metabolism is a word that refers to a set of biochemical processes within your body that produce energy and sustain life. If these processes go haywire, due to disease, then they can cause an excess production of hydrogen (H+) ions. These ions are acidic, and therefore the level of acidity in your body increases, leading to acidemia, an abnormally low pH of the blood, <7.35. The pH of the blood mimics the overall physiological state in the body. In short, a metabolic process is like a power plant producing energy. If a nuclear power plant goes haywire for any reason, then we know what the consequences will be: uncontrolled and excessive nuclear energetic reactions leading to the leakage of large amounts of radioactive material out into the environment. In our body, this radioactive material is acid (or hydrogen ions). Acidemia can also occur if the kidneys are sick and they do not excrete enough hydrogen ions out of th Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis In Patients With Severe Sepsis And Septic Shock: A Longitudinal Quantitative Study

Metabolic Acidosis In Patients With Severe Sepsis And Septic Shock: A Longitudinal Quantitative Study

Patients:Sixty patients with either severe sepsis or septic shock. Measurements and Main Results:Data were collected until 5 days after intensive care unit admission. We studied the contribution of inorganic ion difference, lactate, albumin, phosphate, and strong ion gap to metabolic acidosis. At admission, standard base excess was 6.69 4.19 mEq/L in survivors vs. 11.63 4.87 mEq/L in nonsurvivors (p < .05); inorganic ion difference (mainly resulting from hyperchloremia) was responsible for a decrease in standard base excess by 5.64 4.96 mEq/L in survivors vs. 8.94 7.06 mEq/L in nonsurvivors (p < .05); strong ion gap was responsible for a decrease in standard base excess by 4.07 3.57 mEq/L in survivors vs. 4.92 5.55 mEq/L in nonsurvivors with a nonsignificant probability value; and lactate was responsible for a decrease in standard base excess to 1.34 2.07 mEq/L in survivors vs. 1.61 2.25 mEq/L in nonsurvivors with a nonsignificant probability value. Albumin had an important alkalinizing effect in both groups; phosphate had a minimal acid-base effect. Acidosis in survivors was corrected during the study period as a result of a decrease in lactate and strong ion gap levels, whereas nonsurvivors did not correct their metabolic acidosis. In addition to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and serum creatinine level, inorganic ion difference acidosis magnitude at intensive care unit admission was independently associated with a worse outcome. Conclusions:Patients with severe sepsis and septic shock exhibit a complex metabolic acidosis at intensive care unit admission, caused predominantly by hyperchloremic acidosis, which was more pronounced in nonsurvivors. Acidosis resolution in survivors was attributable to a decrease in strong ion gap and lactate leve Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management: Management Of Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis And Management: Management Of Metabolic Acidosis

Recommendations for the treatment of acute metabolic acidosis Gunnerson, K. J., Saul, M., He, S. & Kellum, J. Lactate versus non-lactate metabolic acidosis: a retrospective outcome evaluation of critically ill patients. Crit. Care Med. 10, R22-R32 (2006). Eustace, J. A., Astor, B., Muntner, P M., Ikizler, T. A. & Coresh, J. Prevalence of acidosis and inflammation and their association with low serum albumin in chronic kidney disease. Kidney Int. 65, 1031-1040 (2004). Kraut, J. A. & Kurtz, I. Metabolic acidosis of CKD: diagnosis, clinical characteristics, and treatment. Am. J. Kidney Dis. 45, 978-993 (2005). Kalantar-Zadeh, K., Mehrotra, R., Fouque, D. & Kopple, J. D. Metabolic acidosis and malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome in chronic renal failure. Semin. Dial. 17, 455-465 (2004). Kraut, J. A. & Kurtz, I. Controversies in the treatment of acute metabolic acidosis. NephSAP 5, 1-9 (2006). Cohen, R. M., Feldman, G. M. & Fernandez, P C. The balance of acid base and charge in health and disease. Kidney Int. 52, 287-293 (1997). Rodriguez-Soriano, J. & Vallo, A. Renal tubular acidosis. Pediatr. Nephrol. 4, 268-275 (1990). Wagner, C. A., Devuyst, O., Bourgeois, S. & Mohebbi, N. Regulated acid-base transport in the collecting duct. Pflugers Arch. 458, 137-156 (2009). Boron, W. F. Acid base transport by the renal proximal tubule. J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 17, 2368-2382 (2006). Igarashi, T., Sekine, T. & Watanabe, H. Molecular basis of proximal renal tubular acidosis. J. Nephrol. 15, S135-S141 (2002). Sly, W. S., Sato, S. & Zhu, X. L. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase isozymes in disorders involving osteopetrosis and/or renal tubular acidosis. Clin. Biochem. 24, 311-318 (1991). Dinour, D. et al. A novel missense mutation in the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1/ SLC4A4) Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metabolic Acidosis ). Lactic acidosis (due to physiologic processes) Lactic acidosis (due to exogenous toxins) Toluene (initially high gap; subsequent excretion of metabolites normalizes gap) HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors Biguanides (rare except with acute kidney injury) Normal anion gap (hyperchloremic acidosis) Renal tubular acidosis, types 1, 2, and 4 The most common causes of a high anion gap metabolic acidosis are Ketoacidosis is a common complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (see diabetic ketoacidosis ), but it also occurs with chronic alcoholism (see alcoholic ketoacidos Continue reading >>

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