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Metabolic Acidosis Sepsis Treatment

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In this video we discuss the progression of a systemic infection including systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock and multi organ dysfunction syndrome.

Metabolic Resuscitation In Sepsis: A Necessary Step Beyond The Hemodynamic?

Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic? Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic? Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic? Heitor Pons Leite1, Lcio Flvio Peixoto de Lima2 Discipline of Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of So Paulo, So Paulo, Correspondence to: Heitor Pons Leite. Discipline of Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of So Paulo, Rua Loefgreen 1647, So Paulo, Brazil. Email: Abstract: Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduc Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. One of our CDI noted an elevated lactic acid and queried the physician for a diagnosis. The patient did not have Sepsis. Our physician advisor said not to do that because the next lactic acid was normal. She said we should also be looking for the underlying cause of the lactic acidosis and not querying for the diagnosis. A diagnosis of lactic acidosis will give us a CC. Other CDI's have said that if the elevated lactic acid was treated, monitored or evaluated we should be querying for the diagnosis. Does anyone have any direction on how this should be handled?
    Is lactic acidosis always inherent in other conditions and that's what we should focus on?
    What can we pick up the diagnosis by itself as a CC / when should we query to get to documented in the chart?
    Are there any other clinical parameters we should be looking at when evaluating whether we should query such as the anion gap?
    Is there a specific treatment for metabolic acidosis?
    Thank you,
    Christine Butka RN MSN
    CDI Lead
    CentraState Medical Center
    Freehold, NJ

  2. What a timely comment. Recently, our coding auditor suggested that we should always keep an eye out for the cc "acidosis". It seems to me that lactic acidosis could be inherent to the disease process of sepsis and therefore should not be captured. Any thoughts?
    Yvonne B RN CDI Salinas, CA.

  3. Hello all! I agree, I believe lactic acidosis is inherent to sepsis. It is one of the most important indicators that gives the clnician a clue that sepsis may be present. Our fluid administration policy was actually developed on the lactic acid result: the higher the number, the more fluid we bolused (in non-CHF patients, of course). In cases were Sepsis is determined not to be present, we will query the provider, providing they treated or monitored the acidosis in some manner
    Shiloh

  4. -> Continue reading
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Metabolic Acidosis Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Type 1 Renal Tubular Acidosis, Type 2 Renal Tubular Acidosis

Metabolic AcidosisTreatment & Management Author: Christie P Thomas, MBBS, FRCP, FASN, FAHA; Chief Editor: Vecihi Batuman, MD, FASN more... Treatment of acute metabolic acidosis by alkali therapy is usually indicated to raise and maintain the plasma pH to greater than 7.20. In the following two circumstances this is particularly important. When the serum pH is below 7.20, a continued fall in the serum HCO3- level may result in a significant drop in pH. This is especially true when the PCO2 is close to the lower limit of compensation, which in an otherwise healthy young individual is approximately 15 mm Hg. With increasing age and other complicating illnesses, the limit of compensation is likely to be less. A further small drop in HCO3- at this point thus is not matched by a corresponding fall in PaCO2, and rapid decompensation can occur. For example, in a patient with metabolic acidosis with a serum HCO3- level of 9 mEq/L and a maximally compensated PCO2 of 20 mm Hg, a drop in the serum HCO3- level to 7 mEq/L results in a change in pH from 7.28 to 7.16. A second situation in which HCO3- correction should be considered is in well-compensated metabolic acidosis with impending respira Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. One of our CDI noted an elevated lactic acid and queried the physician for a diagnosis. The patient did not have Sepsis. Our physician advisor said not to do that because the next lactic acid was normal. She said we should also be looking for the underlying cause of the lactic acidosis and not querying for the diagnosis. A diagnosis of lactic acidosis will give us a CC. Other CDI's have said that if the elevated lactic acid was treated, monitored or evaluated we should be querying for the diagnosis. Does anyone have any direction on how this should be handled?
    Is lactic acidosis always inherent in other conditions and that's what we should focus on?
    What can we pick up the diagnosis by itself as a CC / when should we query to get to documented in the chart?
    Are there any other clinical parameters we should be looking at when evaluating whether we should query such as the anion gap?
    Is there a specific treatment for metabolic acidosis?
    Thank you,
    Christine Butka RN MSN
    CDI Lead
    CentraState Medical Center
    Freehold, NJ

  2. What a timely comment. Recently, our coding auditor suggested that we should always keep an eye out for the cc "acidosis". It seems to me that lactic acidosis could be inherent to the disease process of sepsis and therefore should not be captured. Any thoughts?
    Yvonne B RN CDI Salinas, CA.

  3. Hello all! I agree, I believe lactic acidosis is inherent to sepsis. It is one of the most important indicators that gives the clnician a clue that sepsis may be present. Our fluid administration policy was actually developed on the lactic acid result: the higher the number, the more fluid we bolused (in non-CHF patients, of course). In cases were Sepsis is determined not to be present, we will query the provider, providing they treated or monitored the acidosis in some manner
    Shiloh

  4. -> Continue reading
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Metabolic Acidosis In Patients With Severe Sepsis And Septic Shock: A Longitudinal Quantitative Study

Patients:Sixty patients with either severe sepsis or septic shock. Measurements and Main Results:Data were collected until 5 days after intensive care unit admission. We studied the contribution of inorganic ion difference, lactate, albumin, phosphate, and strong ion gap to metabolic acidosis. At admission, standard base excess was 6.69 4.19 mEq/L in survivors vs. 11.63 4.87 mEq/L in nonsurvivors (p < .05); inorganic ion difference (mainly resulting from hyperchloremia) was responsible for a decrease in standard base excess by 5.64 4.96 mEq/L in survivors vs. 8.94 7.06 mEq/L in nonsurvivors (p < .05); strong ion gap was responsible for a decrease in standard base excess by 4.07 3.57 mEq/L in survivors vs. 4.92 5.55 mEq/L in nonsurvivors with a nonsignificant probability value; and lactate was responsible for a decrease in standard base excess to 1.34 2.07 mEq/L in survivors vs. 1.61 2.25 mEq/L in nonsurvivors with a nonsignificant probability value. Albumin had an important alkalinizing effect in both groups; phosphate had a minimal acid-base effect. Acidosis in survivors was corrected during the study period as a result of a decrease in lactate and strong ion gap levels, whereas Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. One of our CDI noted an elevated lactic acid and queried the physician for a diagnosis. The patient did not have Sepsis. Our physician advisor said not to do that because the next lactic acid was normal. She said we should also be looking for the underlying cause of the lactic acidosis and not querying for the diagnosis. A diagnosis of lactic acidosis will give us a CC. Other CDI's have said that if the elevated lactic acid was treated, monitored or evaluated we should be querying for the diagnosis. Does anyone have any direction on how this should be handled?
    Is lactic acidosis always inherent in other conditions and that's what we should focus on?
    What can we pick up the diagnosis by itself as a CC / when should we query to get to documented in the chart?
    Are there any other clinical parameters we should be looking at when evaluating whether we should query such as the anion gap?
    Is there a specific treatment for metabolic acidosis?
    Thank you,
    Christine Butka RN MSN
    CDI Lead
    CentraState Medical Center
    Freehold, NJ

  2. What a timely comment. Recently, our coding auditor suggested that we should always keep an eye out for the cc "acidosis". It seems to me that lactic acidosis could be inherent to the disease process of sepsis and therefore should not be captured. Any thoughts?
    Yvonne B RN CDI Salinas, CA.

  3. Hello all! I agree, I believe lactic acidosis is inherent to sepsis. It is one of the most important indicators that gives the clnician a clue that sepsis may be present. Our fluid administration policy was actually developed on the lactic acid result: the higher the number, the more fluid we bolused (in non-CHF patients, of course). In cases were Sepsis is determined not to be present, we will query the provider, providing they treated or monitored the acidosis in some manner
    Shiloh

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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