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Metabolic Acidosis Pathophysiology

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Acidosis And Alkalosis Pathophysiology

This video is to help understand the difference between Acidosis and Alkalosis. Acidosis is excessive blood acidity caused by an overabundance of acid in the blood or a loss of bicarbonate from the blood (metabolic acidosis), or by a buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood that results from poor lung function or slow breathing (respiratory acidosis). Blood acidity increases when people ingest substances that contain or produce acid or when the lungs do not expel enough carbon dioxide. People with metabolic acidosis have nausea, vomiting, and fatigue and may breathe faster and deeper than normal. People with respiratory acidosis have headache and confusion, and breathing may appear shallow, slow, or both. Tests on blood samples show there is too much acid. If an increase in acid overwhelms the bodys pH buffering systems, the blood will become acidic. As blood pH drops, the parts of the brain that regulate breathing are stimulated to produce faster and deeper breathing. Breathing faster and deeper increases the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled. The kidneys also try to compensate by excreting more acid in the urine. However, both mechanisms can be overwhelmed if the body continues to Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. rumSmuggler

    I recently (couple weeks ago) started weights and also taking some protein powder (low carb - 1,8g per serving).
    As suggested I raised my protein intake and I'm somewhere around 1 to 1.2 protein ratio. Last couple days I used ketostix to test my ketones and it was negative. I'm sure I didn't exceed 20g carbs per day because I track all my food.
    Could that higher protein intake kick me out of ketosis?

  2. gupe

    As far as I've been able to discover, there are no absolutely definitive answers to the excess protein => additional glucose => inhibition of ketosis? causal chain question.
    This is a good article: "If You Eat Excess Protein, Does It Turn Into Excess Glucose?" on ketotic.org.
    And here is a recent discussion on "After workout protein needs" on /r/ketogains.
    An important unresolved question is: is gluconeogenesis (the manufacture of new glucose by the liver using proteins and fat) a supply-driven process or a demand-driven process?
    If it is a supply-driven process, then it seems more plausible that excess consumption of protein will lead to higher blood sugar levels.
    But if it's demand-driven, then excess glucose might just be due to the slower removal of glucose from the blood-stream after protein has been eaten, causing a bit of a build-up.
    I think that it might vary a lot from person to person. The best is to measure your own blood ketone concentration before and after eating protein. (The ketostix method is not as reliable, particularly if you've just finished a work-out.)
    Edit: fixed link.

  3. darthluiggi

    It can, but it depends on various factors such as weight, activity level, etc.
    I asked the science behind it to to /u/gogge and he gave a very good explanation in another post.
    Fact is, if you are doing strength training you will need to increase your protein intake, otherwise you will not grow muscle. Also protein comes into play if you are eating at a deficit.
    If you are completely sure that protein is taking you out of ketosis, then drop your intake to 1.0 and see if you get back.
    How much do you weight, what % BF do you have, what kind of excercises are you doing and for how long?
    As a side note: don't rely on ketostsix to see if you are in or out of keto.
    *Edited for grammar.

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