diabetestalk.net

Metabolic Acidosis Levels

Share on facebook

Best Of EDM : https://goo.gl/DYDGDh Nonstop : https://goo.gl/4VwtnZ Nhc vit tuyn chn : https://goo.gl/wVwWcJ Best of EDM top 10 Ahrix muisc #2 | New Electro House & Dancer 2018 : https://youtu.be/_FyFR51A60Y ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tracklist:...................................... ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Peanut - Music Facebook https://fb.com/peanutedm Website https://peanutedm.blogspot.com/ Soundcloud ................................. Twitter https://twitter.com/peanut42307403 Instagram .................................... ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Follow DEAMN: + Wedsite: http://deamn.com + Youtube: http://youtube.com/deamnmusic + Soundcloud: http://soundcloud.com/deamnmusic + Facebook: http://facebook.com/deamnmusic + Instagram: http://instagram.com/deamnmusic + Twitter: http://twitter.com/deamnmusic DISCLAIMER : If you have problems about copyright or label, please contact me via email or YT inbox. Thank you :) If you wanna use my uploads in your videos/streams, please give a link back to my original video, that's all ;)

Simple Method Of Acid Base Balance Interpretation

A FOUR STEP METHOD FOR INTERPRETATION OF ABGS Usefulness This method is simple, easy and can be used for the majority of ABGs. It only addresses acid-base balance and considers just 3 values. pH, PaCO2 HCO3- Step 1. Use pH to determine Acidosis or Alkalosis. ph < 7.35 7.35-7.45 > 7.45 Acidosis Normal or Compensated Alkalosis Step 2. Use PaCO2 to determine respiratory effect. PaCO2 < 35 35 -45 > 45 Tends toward alkalosis Causes high pH Neutralizes low pH Normal or Compensated Tends toward acidosis Causes low pH Neutralizes high pH Step 3. Assume metabolic cause when respiratory is ruled out. You'll be right most of the time if you remember this simple table: High pH Low pH Alkalosis Acidosis High PaCO2 Low PaCO2 High PaCO2 Low PaCO2 Metabolic Respiratory Respiratory Metabolic If PaCO2 is abnormal and pH is normal, it indicates compensation. pH > 7.4 would be a compensated alkalosis. pH < 7.4 would be a compensated acidosis. These steps will make more sense if we apply them to actual ABG values. Click here to interpret some ABG values using these steps. You may want to refer back to these steps (click on "linked" steps or use "BACK" button on your browser) or print out this page for Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. emberleo

    Hi guys this may be tmi but I just want to see what I can do to fix it or what I'm doing wrong. I'm closing out my 3rd week on this diet and the last couple of days I've had the real strong urine smell from ketosis and rash like symptoms. Am I not drinking enough water potentially? Or eating too much protein potentially? I'm not feeling too well. I feel a bit weighed down with acid. Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. Art3mis

    the urine smell will pass (or maybe i do not notice it as much YEEP!)....the rash i can not speak to, however, could be just the stress your body is going through while it adjusts, OR it could be your sensitive to something in the IP packets, OR it could be not related at all.
    a few questions...
    how much water are you drinking?
    where is the rash? all over, certain places? does anything make it go away, or is it always there?
    have you ever had your Blood sugar tested? if so, how long ago?
    describe the "not feeling too well"....while your body is adjusting you will feel like poop but its kinda certain symptoms...so what are yours?

  3. Jez

    What does weighed down with acid mean?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Understand medical acid base problems with this clear explanation from Dr. Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. Illustrations explain acidosis, acidemia, alkalosis, alkalemia, ABGs, pH, and more. This is video 1 of 8 on medical acid base. Other videos in the acid base series cover the key points of anion gap, metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, respiratory acidosis, respiratory alkalosis, and include practice problems to test your understanding. Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. Co-founder of http://www.medcram.com. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_... Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.

Acid Base Disorders

Arterial blood gas analysis is used to determine the adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation, assess respiratory function and determine the acid–base balance. These data provide information regarding potential primary and compensatory processes that affect the body’s acid–base buffering system. Interpret the ABGs in a stepwise manner: Determine the adequacy of oxygenation (PaO2) Normal range: 80–100 mmHg (10.6–13.3 kPa) Determine pH status Normal pH range: 7.35–7.45 (H+ 35–45 nmol/L) pH <7.35: Acidosis is an abnormal process that increases the serum hydrogen ion concentration, lowers the pH and results in acidaemia. pH >7.45: Alkalosis is an abnormal process that decreases the hydrogen ion concentration and results in alkalaemia. Determine the respiratory component (PaCO2) Primary respiratory acidosis (hypoventilation) if pH <7.35 and HCO3– normal. Normal range: PaCO2 35–45 mmHg (4.7–6.0 kPa) PaCO2 >45 mmHg (> 6.0 kPa): Respiratory compensation for metabolic alkalosis if pH >7.45 and HCO3– (increased). PaCO2 <35 mmHg (4.7 kPa): Primary respiratory alkalosis (hyperventilation) if pH >7.45 and HCO3– normal. Respiratory compensation for metabolic acidosis if pH Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. sadstyle

    Yesterday a paramedic was doing routine tests on me, which included a blood sugar level test. Mine was 3.1mmol/l. I had to take 2 tubes of the oral glucose gel to get it back within the normal range (above 4). They asked me if I had had something to eat that day and I did. I had a keto dinner (creamy cheesy spinach, tuna, and some broccoli and green beans sautéed in butter) 4-5 hours before the test.
    Is this normal when following keto? I don't think I have ever had a problem with a low blood sugar. Should I be worried? Or could it be something unrelated to keto and more to do with a medication I'm taking?
    Thanks guys.

  2. sadstyle

    I was freezing and shivering. And the paramedic said my hands were very cold and clammy. I didn't have headache or dizziness, but some palpitations were present that came and go several times during the hour. I was surprised when they said I had low blood sugar because I didn't think I was. I don't know if those symptoms may be attributed to it.
    Also, a bit of a science question. I thought that body maintains blood sugar through glycogen (if carbs is significantly reduced) or through glycerol from the triglycerides. So even if you don't get enough carbs/sugar from food, your body gets it from fat/glycogen? So your blood sugar should still remain within the narrow range?

  3. ivosaurus

    No. Being in ketosis will in fact give you a far lower constant blood sugar, and is a normal part of being in this state.
    This is because ketosis is a complete shift in gear for your body's metabolism. You stop using glucose as an energy source (mostly), so it simply doesn't need to be present in the blood any more.
    Glycogen is mainly used as a temporary store of glucose when you are on a "normal" carb-based diet. It's stored in your liver and muscles and will deplete over a day or two after you start a keto diet, and thereafter your body's metabolism will completely move to a ketone/fat-based one.
    Your body will convert protein, either from outside sources or your own muscle to get its minimum needed glucose if you are eating a truly tiny / non-existent amount of carbs. The recommended 20-30 grams daily is easily enough for your body's needs during ketosis, though.
    All that said, you should definitely try and find out what gave you such serious symptoms; maybe it was deficiency in other minerals (or maybe it was truly blood sugar in some way) but if the paramedics weren't informed you were practising a keto diet that might have lead them to a wrong conclusion (not necessarily, but might have).

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. See also separate Lactic Acidosis and Arterial Blood Gases - Indications and Interpretations articles. Description Metabolic acidosis is defined as an arterial blood pH <7.35 with plasma bicarbonate <22 mmol/L. Respiratory compensation occurs normally immediately, unless there is respiratory pathology. Pure metabolic acidosis is a term used to describe when there is not another primary acid-base derangement - ie there is not a mixed acid-base disorder. Compensation may be partial (very early in time course, limited by other acid-base derangements, or the acidosis exceeds the maximum compensation possible) or full. The Winter formula can be helpful here - the formula allows calculation of the expected compensating pCO2: If the measured pCO2 is >expected pCO2 then additional respiratory acidosis may also be present. It is important to remember that metabolic acidosis is not a diagnosis; rather, it is a metabolic derangement that in Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. [deleted]

    A friend of mine who is a Chem major was saying carbonyl is just a more general classification, but can anyone give an actual definition or a list of conditions that differentiates between the two?

  2. henderson_hasselhoff

    An acyl group generally refers to the carbon group derived from a carboxylic acid whereas a carbonyl group is a more general functional group with a carbon double bonded to an oxygen. This can include carboxylic acids, ketones, esters, aldehydes, amides, etc.

  3. theddman

    I love Wikipedia, but this is clearly a job for IUPAC Gold Book (play super hero music)
    http://goldbook.iupac.org/A00123.html

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Metabolic Acidosis Levels

    Metabolic acidosis is a condition that occurs when the body produces excessive quantities of acid or when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. If unchecked, metabolic acidosis leads to acidemia, i.e., blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of hydrogen ions by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3−) in the kidney. Its causes are diverse, and its consequences can be serious, inclu ...

    ketosis Apr 28, 2018
  • How Does Ketoacidosis Cause Metabolic Acidosis

    Abstract The utility of bicarbonate administration to patients with severe metabolic acidosis remains controversial. Chronic bicarbonate replacement is obviously indicated for patients who continue to lose bicarbonate in the ambulatory setting, particularly patients with renal tubular acidosis syndromes or diarrhea. In patients with acute lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis, lactate and ketone bodies can be converted back to bicarbonate if the clini ...

    ketosis Jan 3, 2018
  • Metabolic Acidosis And Metabolic Alkalosis Ppt

    Acidemia: Arterial blood pH below the normal range (<7.36) Alkalemia: Arterial bloodpH above the normal range (>7.44) Acidosis: a processthat tends to lower the pH (can be caused by fall in serum bicarbonate or a rise in PCO2 Alkalosis: a processthat tends to raise the pH (can be caused by increase in serum bicarbonate or a decrease in PCO2 Base Excess: the amount of strong acid needed to bring a solution back to a pH of 7.4 while keeping PCO2 a ...

    ketosis Apr 29, 2018
  • Respiratory Acidosis Vs Metabolic Acidosis

    For acidosis referring to acidity of the urine, see renal tubular acidosis. "Acidemia" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Academia. Acidosis is a process causing increased acidity in the blood and other body tissues (i.e., an increased hydrogen ion concentration). If not further qualified, it usually refers to acidity of the blood plasma. The term acidemia describes the state of low blood pH, while acidosis is used to describe the proc ...

    ketosis Apr 30, 2018
  • Which Metabolic Rate Resulted In Metabolic Acidosis?

    The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. Acidosis is classified as either respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of acidosis is usually caused when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through bre ...

    ketosis Jan 11, 2018
  • Respiratory Acidosis And Metabolic Acidosis At The Same Time

    Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [ 1 ] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3)/PaCO2 ratio, the ...

    ketosis Apr 29, 2018

More in ketosis