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Metabolic Acidosis Labs

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What is BASAL METABOLIC RATE? What does BASAL METABOLIC RATE mean? BASAL METABOLIC RATE meaning - BASAL METABOLIC RATE definition - BASAL METABOLIC RATE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the minimal rate of energy expenditure per unit time by endothermic animals at rest. It is reported in energy units per unit time ranging from watt (joule/second) to ml O2/min or joule per hour per kg body mass J/(hkg)). Proper measurement requires a strict set of criteria be met. These criteria include being in a physically and psychologically undisturbed state, in a thermally neutral environment, while in the post-absorptive state (i.e., not actively digesting food). In bradymetabolic animals, such as fish and reptiles, the equivalent term standard metabolic rate (SMR) is used. It follows the same criteria as BMR, but requires the documentation of the temperature at which the metabolic rate was measured. This makes BMR a variant of standard metabolic rate measurement that excludes the temperature data, a practice that has led to problems in defining "standard" rates of metabolism for many mammals. Metabolism comprises the processes that the body needs to function. Basal metabolic rate is the amount of energy expressed in calories that a person needs to keep the body functioning at rest. Some of those processes are breathing, blood circulation, controlling body temperature, cell growth, brain and nerve function, and contraction of muscles. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) affects the rate that a person burns calories and ultimately whether that individual maintains, gains, or loses weight. The basal metabolic rate accounts for about 60 to 75% of the daily calorie expenditure by individuals. It is influenced by several factors. BMR typically declines by 12% per decade after age 20, mostly due to loss of fat-free mass, although the variability between individuals is high. The body's generation of heat is known as thermogenesis and it can be measured to determine the amount of energy expended. BMR generally decreases with age and with the decrease in lean body mass (as may happen with aging). Increasing muscle mass has the effect of increasing BMR. Aerobic (resistance) fitness level, a product of cardiovascular exercise, while previously thought to have effect on BMR, has been shown in the 1990s not to correlate with BMR when adjusted for fat-free body mass. But anaerobic exercise does increase resting energy consumption (see "aerobic vs. anaerobic exercise"). Illness, previously consumed food and beverages, environmental temperature, and stress levels can affect one's overall energy expenditure as well as one's BMR. BMR is measured under very restrictive circumstances when a person is awake. An accurate BMR measurement requires that the person's sympathetic nervous system not be stimulated, a condition which requires complete rest. A more common measurement, which uses less strict criteria, is resting metabolic rate (RMR).

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cau Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. KetoHippy

    I want to test my blood ketones after I eat something to see if it kicks me out of ketosis. How soon after I eat the item should I test?

  2. BillJay

    candrak:


    I want to test my blood ketones after I eat something to see if it kicks me out of ketosis. How soon after I eat the item should I test?

    When testing blood glucose, I usually test just before (T0), 30 minutes (T30), 60 minutes (T60) and 90 minutes (T90), but ketone strips are more expensive, so I usually do T0 and T60.

  3. Tim_Scudder

    Candra, I've found that I have to wait many hours before I see a true reaction. For example, if I have a carb-refeed meal @ dinner (I do carbs like rice/sweet-potato once every few weeks), I won't see my ketones drop much until at least the next morning (and I can usually feel that I'm out of Ketosis). My theory/hypothesis (based on data like the chart below and the few times I've dropped below 0.5 ml/mol over the past year since I've measured BHB with the Precision Xtra), is that the ketones measured in your blood are the "surplus" ketones your body has not consumed - it's not what your cells are consuming but what's left over - so if your cells shift to consume glucose, this level won't drop precipitously after a carb meal. If you eat enough carbs to push your blood sugar high (assuming your body has filled it's glycogen stores), your body is going to focus on utilizing the glucose first (glucose is toxic at high levels), leaving your ketone levels somewhat unchanged, but signaling to your liver to slowly reduce ketone production. As you can see in the chart below, it slowly lowers over a few days. I've personally found that (once keto adapted) I can have a high carb meal every few weeks and regain my ketone levels the next day after skipping a meal and having a low carb lunch/dinner...hope that helps.

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metab Continue reading >>

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  1. chelseyRN

    This is my 13th day on the ketogenic diet. I bought ketone test strips to test my urine. I've been testing a few times a day and been in the low range. This morning I've tested twice and it says "Large" and correlates with the "8 mmol/L" color on the test strips. I've been "high fat, moderate whole foods carbs" for months, if not longer. I'm not diabetic but have a glucometer to test for blood sugar spikes to know what foods to avoid. My blood sugars have been 60-90s consistently. Is there any concern about spilling too many ketones? Educate me please!!

  2. Jason_v

    Just due to the nature of the presence of the 3 different versions of circulating ketones, some will always spill over to the urine. how detectable they are will depend on your hydration level more than anything else. So no there is no concern, which is good because you can't do anything about it anyway. If you are producing ketones, some will show up in the urine:period. if you are hyper hydrated you won't see many, if you are dehydrated you will see dark purple. Exercise tends to reduce the amount of ketones in the urine, in my experience. There is a falsehood that circulates that your body "learns" to use ketones more effectively thus "spilling less" into the urine but that's not technically correct. Although the use of ketones by different tissues can be up regulated (made more efficient depending on demand) there will always be some in the urine if you are producing them at all.

  3. ketohealthclub

    I'd love to read the data explaining that. Do you have any links? I've definitely read the opposite: that over time your body wastes fewer ketones, which renders the ketostix pretty useless after a few weeks.

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this will be a series of lectures to illustrate in simple and precise way how you can manage acid-base imbalance in practical step by step approach.

Approach To The Adult With Metabolic Acidosis

INTRODUCTION On a typical Western diet, approximately 15,000 mmol of carbon dioxide (which can generate carbonic acid as it combines with water) and 50 to 100 mEq of nonvolatile acid (mostly sulfuric acid derived from the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids) are produced each day. Acid-base balance is maintained by pulmonary and renal excretion of carbon dioxide and nonvolatile acid, respectively. Renal excretion of acid involves the combination of hydrogen ions with urinary titratable acids, particularly phosphate (HPO42- + H+ —> H2PO4-), and ammonia to form ammonium (NH3 + H+ —> NH4+) [1]. The latter is the primary adaptive response since ammonia production from the metabolism of glutamine can be appropriately increased in response to an acid load [2]. Acid-base balance is usually assessed in terms of the bicarbonate-carbon dioxide buffer system: Dissolved CO2 + H2O <—> H2CO3 <—> HCO3- + H+ The ratio between these reactants can be expressed by the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. By convention, the pKa of 6.10 is used when the dominator is the concentration of dissolved CO2, and this is proportional to the pCO2 (the actual concentration of the acid H2CO3 is very lo Continue reading >>

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  1. Liang-Hai Sie

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life threatening condition, due to lack of insulin serious acidosis, high blood sugars causing loss of fluid because of peeing a lot causing life threatening dehydration, low blood pressure, acute kidney failure etc. etc., while not eating causing ketosis doesn’t have all above mentioned problems, just ketones due to low carbs.

  2. Michael L. Jirka

    Muslims probably have a degree of ketosis from fasting for a month of Ramadan and they seem to do OK. Generally, ketones rise when you force your body to burn fats as an alternate source of energy. It is just not as efficient as clean burning GLUCOSE … our main energy source. The byproducts of using fats for energy are ketones (acetone) and acids (beta-hydroxybutyric acid and acetoacetic acid). If you are in firm grasp of what you are doing this for (body sculpting or puke and purge party for the play about the Holocaust or marathon training) then a short lived trip to Ketosis Land might be all right. IF YOU ARE DOING THIS BECAUSE YOUR MIND CAN SEE ONLY A FAT PIG IN THE MIRROR … get some help … My favorite singer of the past century, Karen Carpenter, died from anorexia … and my life lost some of it’s luster at her passing.

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