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Metabolic Acidosis Lab Values

Metabolic Acidosis Workup

Metabolic Acidosis Workup

Approach Considerations Often the first clue to metabolic acidosis is a decreased serum HCO3- concentration observed when serum electrolytes are measured. Remember, however, that a decreased serum [HCO3-] level can be observed as a compensatory response to respiratory alkalosis. An [HCO3-] level of less than 15 mEq/L, however, almost always is due, at least in part, to metabolic acidosis. The only definitive way to diagnose metabolic acidosis is by simultaneous measurement of serum electrolytes and arterial blood gases (ABGs), which shows pH and PaCO2 to be low; calculated HCO3- also is low. (For more information, see Metabolic Alkalosis.) A low serum HCO3- and a pH of less than 7.40 upon ABG analysis confirm metabolic acidosis. Go to Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis and Emergent Management of Metabolic Acidosis for complete information on these topics. Continue reading >>

Co2 Blood Test

Co2 Blood Test

What is a CO2 blood test? A CO2 blood test measures the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood serum, which is the liquid part of blood. A CO2 test may also be called: a carbon dioxide test a TCO2 test a total CO2 test bicarbonate test an HCO3 test a CO2 test-serum You may receive a CO2 test as a part of a metabolic panel. A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures electrolytes and blood gases. The body contains two major forms of CO2: HCO3 (bicarbonate, the main form of CO2 in the body) PCO2 (carbon dioxide) Your doctor can use this test to determine if there’s an imbalance between the oxygen and carbon dioxide in your blood or a pH imbalance in your blood. These imbalances can be signs of a kidney, respiratory, or metabolic disorder. Blood gas test » Your doctor will order a CO2 blood test based on your symptoms. Signs of an imbalance of oxygen and carbon dioxide or a pH imbalance include: shortness of breath other breathing difficulties nausea vomiting These symptoms may point to lung dysfunction involving the exchange between oxygen and carbon dioxide. You will need to have your blood’s oxygen and carbon dioxide levels measured frequently if you’re on oxygen therapy or having certain surgeries. Blood samples for a CO2 blood test may be taken from either a vein or an artery. Venipuncture blood sample Venipuncture is the term used to describe a basic blood sample taken from a vein. Your doctor will order a simple venipuncture blood sample if they only want to measure HCO3. To get a venipuncture blood sample, a healthcare provider: cleans the site (often the inside of the elbow) with a germ-killing antiseptic wraps an elastic band around your upper arm to cause the vein to swell with blood gently inserts a needle into the vein and collect blood in Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis is a condition that occurs when the body produces excessive quantities of acid or when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. If unchecked, metabolic acidosis leads to acidemia, i.e., blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of hydrogen ions by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3−) in the kidney. Its causes are diverse, and its consequences can be serious, including coma and death. Together with respiratory acidosis, it is one of the two general causes of acidemia. Terminology : Acidosis refers to a process that causes a low pH in blood and tissues. Acidemia refers specifically to a low pH in the blood. In most cases, acidosis occurs first for reasons explained below. Free hydrogen ions then diffuse into the blood, lowering the pH. Arterial blood gas analysis detects acidemia (pH lower than 7.35). When acidemia is present, acidosis is presumed. Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms are not specific, and diagnosis can be difficult unless the patient presents with clear indications for arterial blood gas sampling. Symptoms may include chest pain, palpitations, headache, altered mental status such as severe anxiety due to hypoxia, decreased visual acuity, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, altered appetite and weight gain, muscle weakness, bone pain, and joint pain. Those in metabolic acidosis may exhibit deep, rapid breathing called Kussmaul respirations which is classically associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Rapid deep breaths increase the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled, thus lowering the serum carbon dioxide levels, resulting in some degree of compensation. Overcompensation via respiratory alkalosis to form an alkalemia does not occur. Extreme acidemia leads to neurological and cardia Continue reading >>

Lab Values: Abgs, Electrolytes, Acid Base Balance, Metabolic Panel, Cbc, Coagulation

Lab Values: Abgs, Electrolytes, Acid Base Balance, Metabolic Panel, Cbc, Coagulation

PaCO2: 35-45 mmHg (Respiratory component) PaO2: 80-100 mmHg (Respiratory component) Serum bicarbonate HCO3-: 22-26 mEq/L (Metabolic Component) Acidosis: < 7.35: H+ diffuses into cells and drives out K+, elevating K+ concentration in ECF Alkalosis: >7.45: H+ diffuses out of cells and K+ diffuses in Respiratory Regulation of Acid Base Balance: - Eliminating or retaining CO2 by the lungs also regulates acid-base balance. - The response is rapid, occur within minutes by altering the rate and depth of respiration - CO2 is a powerful stimulator of the respiratory system - Increasing ventilation increases pH by eliminating CO2 - Decreasing ventilation decreases pH by retaining CO2. - An acute rise in PCO2 is a powerful stimulant to respiration Renal (Metabolic) Regulation of Acid Base Balance: - The ultimate long-term regulator of acid-base balance - Slower to respond, but response is more permanent and selective - Maintain acid-base balance by excreting or conserving bicarbonate and hydrogen ions - When pH decreases, H+ ions are excreted, and HCO3- ions are formed and retained. - When pH increases, H+ are retained, and HCO3- are excreted - Excess loss of bicarbonate via kidneys/GI Continue reading >>

Abg Interpreter

Abg Interpreter

pH CO2 HCO3 Result appears in here. Normal Arterial Blood Gas Values pH 7.35-7.45 PaCO2 35-45 mm Hg PaO2 80-95 mm Hg HCO3 22-26 mEq/L O2 Saturation 95-99% BE +/- 1 Four-Step Guide to ABG Analysis Is the pH normal, acidotic or alkalotic? Are the pCO2 or HCO3 abnormal? Which one appears to influence the pH? If both the pCO2 and HCO3 are abnormal, the one which deviates most from the norm is most likely causing an abnormal pH. Check the pO2. Is the patient hypoxic? I used Swearingen's handbook (1990) to base the results of this calculator. The book makes the distinction between acute and chronic disorders based on symptoms from identical ABGs. This calculator only differentiates between acute (pH abnormal) and compensated (pH normal). Compensation can be seen when both the PCO2 and HCO3 rise or fall together to maintain a normal pH. Part compensation occurs when the PCO2 and HCO3 rise or fall together but the pH remains abnormal. This indicates a compensatory mechanism attempted to restore a normal pH. I have not put exact limits into the calculator. For example, it will perceive respiratory acidosis as any pH < 7.35 and any CO2 > 45 (i.e. a pH of 1 and CO2 of 1000). These results do not naturally occur. pH PaCO2 HCO3 Respiratory Acidosis Acute < 7.35 > 45 Normal Partly Compensated < 7.35 > 45 > 26 Compensated Normal > 45 > 26 Respiratory Alkalosis Acute > 7.45 < 35 Normal Partly Compensated > 7.45 < 35 < 22 Compensated Normal < 35 < 22 Metabolic Acidosis Acute < 7.35 Normal < 22 Partly Compensated < 7.35 < 35 < 22 Compensated Normal < 35 < 22 Metabolic Alkalosis Acute > 7.45 Normal > 26 Partly Compensated > 7.45 > 45 > 26 Compensated Normal > 45 > 26 Mixed Disorders It's possible to have more than one disorder influencing blood gas values. For example ABG's with an alkale Continue reading >>

Common Laboratory (lab) Values - Abgs

Common Laboratory (lab) Values - Abgs

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Laboratory VALUES Home Page Arterial Blood Gases Arterial blood gas analysis provides information on the following: 1] Oxygenation of blood through gas exchange in the lungs. 2] Carbon dioxide (CO2) elimination through respiration. 3] Acid-base balance or imbalance in extra-cellular fluid (ECF). Normal Blood Gases Arterial Venous pH 7.35 - 7.45 7.32 - 7.42 Not a gas, but a measurement of acidity or alkalinity, based on the hydrogen (H+) ions present. The pH of a solution is equal to the negative log of the hydrogen ion concentration in that solution: pH = - log [H+]. PaO2 80 to 100 mm Hg. 28 - 48 mm Hg The partial pressure of oxygen that is dissolved in arterial blood. New Born – Acceptable range 40-70 mm Hg. Elderly: Subtract 1 mm Hg from the minimal 80 mm Hg level for every year over 60 years of age: 80 - (age- 60) (Note: up to age 90) HCO3 22 to 26 mEq/liter (21–28 mEq/L) 19 to 25 mEq/liter The calculated value of the amount of bicarbonate in the bloodstream. Not a blood gas but the anion of carbonic acid. PaCO2 35-45 mm Hg 38-52 mm Hg The amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in arterial blood. Measured. Partial pressure of arterial CO2. (Note: Large A= alveolor CO2). CO2 is called a “volatile acid” because it can combine reversibly with H2O to yield a strongly acidic H+ ion and a weak basic bicarbonate ion (HCO3 -) according to the following equation: CO2 + H2O <--- --> H+ + HCO3 B.E. –2 to +2 mEq/liter Other sources: normal reference range is between -5 to +3. The base excess indicates the amount of excess or insufficient level of bicarbonate in the system. (A negative base excess indicates a base deficit in the blood.) A negative base excess is equivalent to an acid excess. A value outside of the normal r Continue reading >>

Abg (arterial Blood Gas) Practice Quizzes With Tic Tac Toe Method

Abg (arterial Blood Gas) Practice Quizzes With Tic Tac Toe Method

ABG (Arterial Blood Gas) Practice Quizzes with Tic Tac Toe Method This ABG practice quiz has 10 questions that will test your knowledge about metabolic and respiratory disorders. In addition, you will be tested on if the disorder is partially compensated or uncompensated based on the lab values. In order to easily solve arterial blood gas problems, the Tic Tac Toe method is the best way for doing this. If you are unfamiliar with the Tic Tac Toe method for ABGs to read the recommended article to learn how to do it. This ABG practice test will examine your knowledge about respiratory and metabolic disorders when interpreting lab values. 1. Lab values: pH 7.56, paCo2 20, HCO3 20* 2. Lab values: pH 7.23, paCo2 37, HCO3 18* 3. Lab values: pH 7.31, paCo2 34, HCO3 21* 4. Lab values: pH 7.50, paCo2 32, HCO3 24* 5. Lab values: pH 7.46, paCo2 36, HCO3 32* 6. Lab values: pH 7.52, paCo2 48, HCO3 28* 7. Lab values: pH 7.25, paCo2 60, HCO3 27* 8. Lab values: pH 7.55, paCo2 47, HCO3 30* 9. Lab values: pH 7.20, paCo2 49, HCO3 25* 10. Lab values: pH 7.30, paCo2 36, HCO3 16* 11. Lab values: pH 7.41, paCo2 26, HCO3 17* 12. Lab values: pH 7.39, paCo2 48, HCO3 28* Dont forget to tell your friends about this quiz by sharing it your Facebook, Twitter, and other social media. You can also take more fun nursing quizzes . *Disclaimer: While we do our best to provide students with accurate and in-depth study quizzes, this quiz/test is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Please refer to the latest NCLEX review books for the latest updates in nursing. This quiz is copyright RegisteredNurseRn.com. Please do not copy this quiz directly; however, please feel free to share a link to this page with students, friends, and others. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. See also separate Lactic Acidosis and Arterial Blood Gases - Indications and Interpretations articles. Description Metabolic acidosis is defined as an arterial blood pH <7.35 with plasma bicarbonate <22 mmol/L. Respiratory compensation occurs normally immediately, unless there is respiratory pathology. Pure metabolic acidosis is a term used to describe when there is not another primary acid-base derangement - ie there is not a mixed acid-base disorder. Compensation may be partial (very early in time course, limited by other acid-base derangements, or the acidosis exceeds the maximum compensation possible) or full. The Winter formula can be helpful here - the formula allows calculation of the expected compensating pCO2: If the measured pCO2 is >expected pCO2 then additional respiratory acidosis may also be present. It is important to remember that metabolic acidosis is not a diagnosis; rather, it is a metabolic derangement that indicates underlying disease(s) as a cause. Determination of the underlying cause is the key to correcting the acidosis and administering appropriate therapy[1]. Epidemiology It is relatively common, particularly among acutely unwell/critical care patients. There are no reliable figures for its overall incidence or prevalence in the population at large. Causes of metabolic acidosis There are many causes. They can be classified according to their pathophysiological origin, as below. The table is not exhaustive but lists those that are most common or clinically important to detect. Increased acid Continue reading >>

Interpretation Of Arterial Blood Gas

Interpretation Of Arterial Blood Gas

Go to: Introduction Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is an essential part of diagnosing and managing a patient’s oxygenation status and acid–base balance. The usefulness of this diagnostic tool is dependent on being able to correctly interpret the results. Disorders of acid–base balance can create complications in many disease states, and occasionally the abnormality may be so severe so as to become a life-threatening risk factor. A thorough understanding of acid–base balance is mandatory for any physician, and intensivist, and the anesthesiologist is no exception. The three widely used approaches to acid–base physiology are the HCO3- (in the context of pCO2), standard base excess (SBE), and strong ion difference (SID). It has been more than 20 years since the Stewart’s concept of SID was introduced, which is defined as the absolute difference between completely dissociated anions and cations. According to the principle of electrical neutrality, this difference is balanced by the weak acids and CO2. The SID is defined in terms of weak acids and CO2 subsequently has been re-designated as effective SID (SIDe) which is identical to “buffer base.” Similarly, Stewart’s original term for total weak acid concentration (ATOT) is now defined as the dissociated (A-) plus undissociated (AH) weak acid forms. This is familiarly known as anion gap (AG), when normal concentration is actually caused by A-. Thus all the three methods yield virtually identical results when they are used to quantify acid–base status of a given blood sample.[1] Continue reading >>

Acid-base Disorders

Acid-base Disorders

Content currently under development Acid-base disorders are a group of conditions characterized by changes in the concentration of hydrogen ions (H+) or bicarbonate (HCO3-), which lead to changes in the arterial blood pH. These conditions can be categorized as acidoses or alkaloses and have a respiratory or metabolic origin, depending on the cause of the imbalance. Diagnosis is made by arterial blood gas (ABG) interpretation. In the setting of metabolic acidosis, calculation of the anion gap is an important resource to narrow down the possible causes and reach a precise diagnosis. Treatment is based on identifying the underlying cause. Continue reading >>

Bun, Glucose, Creatinine

Bun, Glucose, Creatinine

Normal Values pH = 7.38 - 7.42 [H+] = 40 nM/L for a pH of 7.4 PaCO2 = 40 mm Hg [HCO3] = 24 meq/L Acid base definitions Acid base disorder is considered present when there is abnormality in HCO3 or PaCO2 or pH. Acidosis and alkalosis refer to in-vivo derangement's and not to any change in pH. Acidemia (pH < 7.38) and Alkalemia (pH >7.42) refer to derangement's of blood pH. Kidney and Respiratory system play a key roles in maintaining the acid base status. Primary Acid base disorders Metabolic acidosis loss of [HCO3] 0r addition of [H+] Metabolic alkalosis loss of [H+] or addition of [HCO3] Respiratory acidosis increase in pCO2 Respiratory alkalosis decrease in pCO2 Recquired lab values/information Arterial blood gases: pH, PaCO2,PaO2,Sat,CO BUN, Glucose, Creatinine FIO2 and Clinical history Anion and Cations ANIONS CATIONS Chloride Sodium Bicarbonate(Total CO2) Potassium Proteins Calcium Organic acids Magnesium Phosphates Sulfates Electrochemical balance means that the total anions are the same as total Cations. For practical purposes anion gap is calculated using only Sodium, Chlorides and Total CO2.((140-(104+24)) = 12. Compensatory measures Buffering---occurs immediately Respiratory regulation of pCO2 is intermediate (12-24 hours) Renal regulation of [H] and [HCO3] occurs more slowly (several days) Extracellular almost entirely through bicarbonate whose concentration highest of all buffers small contribution from phosphate Intracellular Hemoglobin can directly buffer protons H+ entry into RBC matched by exit of Na and K+ Hemoglobin can directly buffer dissolved intracellular conversion of Buffer systems Hemoglobin can directly buffer protons H+ entry into RBC matched by exit of Na and K+ Hemoglobin can directly buffer dissolved intracellular conversion of Bicarbonate Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metabolic Acidosis ). Lactic acidosis (due to physiologic processes) Lactic acidosis (due to exogenous toxins) Toluene (initially high gap; subsequent excretion of metabolites normalizes gap) HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors Biguanides (rare except with acute kidney injury) Normal anion gap (hyperchloremic acidosis) Renal tubular acidosis, types 1, 2, and 4 The most common causes of a high anion gap metabolic acidosis are Ketoacidosis is a common complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (see diabetic ketoacidosis ), but it also occurs with chronic alcoholism (see alcoholic ketoacidos Continue reading >>

Simple Method Of Acid Base Balance Interpretation

Simple Method Of Acid Base Balance Interpretation

A FOUR STEP METHOD FOR INTERPRETATION OF ABGS Usefulness This method is simple, easy and can be used for the majority of ABGs. It only addresses acid-base balance and considers just 3 values. pH, PaCO2 HCO3- Step 1. Use pH to determine Acidosis or Alkalosis. ph < 7.35 7.35-7.45 > 7.45 Acidosis Normal or Compensated Alkalosis Step 2. Use PaCO2 to determine respiratory effect. PaCO2 < 35 35 -45 > 45 Tends toward alkalosis Causes high pH Neutralizes low pH Normal or Compensated Tends toward acidosis Causes low pH Neutralizes high pH Step 3. Assume metabolic cause when respiratory is ruled out. You'll be right most of the time if you remember this simple table: High pH Low pH Alkalosis Acidosis High PaCO2 Low PaCO2 High PaCO2 Low PaCO2 Metabolic Respiratory Respiratory Metabolic If PaCO2 is abnormal and pH is normal, it indicates compensation. pH > 7.4 would be a compensated alkalosis. pH < 7.4 would be a compensated acidosis. These steps will make more sense if we apply them to actual ABG values. Click here to interpret some ABG values using these steps. You may want to refer back to these steps (click on "linked" steps or use "BACK" button on your browser) or print out this page for reference. Step 4. Use HC03 to verify metabolic effect Normal HCO3- is 22-26 Please note: Remember, the first three steps apply to the majority of cases, but do not take into account: the possibility of complete compensation, but those cases are usually less serious, and instances of combined respiratory and metabolic imbalance, but those cases are pretty rare. "Combined" disturbance means HCO3- alters the pH in the same direction as the PaCO2. High PaCO2 and low HCO3- (acidosis) or Low PaCO2 and high HCO3- (alkalosis). Continue reading >>

Acid Base Disorders

Acid Base Disorders

Arterial blood gas analysis is used to determine the adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation, assess respiratory function and determine the acid–base balance. These data provide information regarding potential primary and compensatory processes that affect the body’s acid–base buffering system. Interpret the ABGs in a stepwise manner: Determine the adequacy of oxygenation (PaO2) Normal range: 80–100 mmHg (10.6–13.3 kPa) Determine pH status Normal pH range: 7.35–7.45 (H+ 35–45 nmol/L) pH <7.35: Acidosis is an abnormal process that increases the serum hydrogen ion concentration, lowers the pH and results in acidaemia. pH >7.45: Alkalosis is an abnormal process that decreases the hydrogen ion concentration and results in alkalaemia. Determine the respiratory component (PaCO2) Primary respiratory acidosis (hypoventilation) if pH <7.35 and HCO3– normal. Normal range: PaCO2 35–45 mmHg (4.7–6.0 kPa) PaCO2 >45 mmHg (> 6.0 kPa): Respiratory compensation for metabolic alkalosis if pH >7.45 and HCO3– (increased). PaCO2 <35 mmHg (4.7 kPa): Primary respiratory alkalosis (hyperventilation) if pH >7.45 and HCO3– normal. Respiratory compensation for metabolic acidosis if pH <7.35 and HCO3– (decreased). Determine the metabolic component (HCO3–) Normal HCO3– range 22–26 mmol/L HCO3 <22 mmol/L: Primary metabolic acidosis if pH <7.35. Renal compensation for respiratory alkalosis if pH >7.45. HCO3 >26 mmol/L: Primary metabolic alkalosis if pH >7.45. Renal compensation for respiratory acidosis if pH <7.35. Additional definitions Osmolar Gap Use: Screening test for detecting abnormal low MW solutes (e.g. ethanol, methanol & ethylene glycol [Reference]) An elevated osmolar gap (>10) provides indirect evidence for the presence of an abnormal solute which is prese Continue reading >>

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