diabetestalk.net

Metabolic Acidosis Causes

Share on facebook

What is BASAL METABOLIC RATE? What does BASAL METABOLIC RATE mean? BASAL METABOLIC RATE meaning - BASAL METABOLIC RATE definition - BASAL METABOLIC RATE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the minimal rate of energy expenditure per unit time by endothermic animals at rest. It is reported in energy units per unit time ranging from watt (joule/second) to ml O2/min or joule per hour per kg body mass J/(hkg)). Proper measurement requires a strict set of criteria be met. These criteria include being in a physically and psychologically undisturbed state, in a thermally neutral environment, while in the post-absorptive state (i.e., not actively digesting food). In bradymetabolic animals, such as fish and reptiles, the equivalent term standard metabolic rate (SMR) is used. It follows the same criteria as BMR, but requires the documentation of the temperature at which the metabolic rate was measured. This makes BMR a variant of standard metabolic rate measurement that excludes the temperature data, a practice that has led to problems in defining "standard" rates of metabolism for many mammals. Metabolism comprises the processes that the body needs to function. Basal metabolic rate is the amount of energy expressed in calories that a person needs to keep the body functioning at rest. Some of those processes are breathing, blood circulation, controlling body temperature, cell growth, brain and nerve function, and contraction of muscles. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) affects the rate that a person burns calories and ultimately whether that individual maintains, gains, or loses weight. The basal metabolic rate accounts for about 60 to 75% of the daily calorie expenditure by individuals. It is influenced by several factors. BMR typically declines by 12% per decade after age 20, mostly due to loss of fat-free mass, although the variability between individuals is high. The body's generation of heat is known as thermogenesis and it can be measured to determine the amount of energy expended. BMR generally decreases with age and with the decrease in lean body mass (as may happen with aging). Increasing muscle mass has the effect of increasing BMR. Aerobic (resistance) fitness level, a product of cardiovascular exercise, while previously thought to have effect on BMR, has been shown in the 1990s not to correlate with BMR when adjusted for fat-free body mass. But anaerobic exercise does increase resting energy consumption (see "aerobic vs. anaerobic exercise"). Illness, previously consumed food and beverages, environmental temperature, and stress levels can affect one's overall energy expenditure as well as one's BMR. BMR is measured under very restrictive circumstances when a person is awake. An accurate BMR measurement requires that the person's sympathetic nervous system not be stimulated, a condition which requires complete rest. A more common measurement, which uses less strict criteria, is resting metabolic rate (RMR).

Metabolic Acidosis.

Abstract Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortal Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. ThePenguinGod

    I seeing some people saying they try not to eat any carbs!
    Is there a benefit to this? If the goal is just to put your body into / stay in ketosis then does it matter what your carb intake is as long as you maintain a state of ketosis?
    I've been trying to keep my carbs to less than 20g / day, but when I was eating ~40g / day I was still able to stay in ketosis.
    Is there any advantage of me staying at less than 20g carbs if I can still stay in Ketosis ~ 40g's?

  2. [deleted]

    On the other hand. If I go below 20 carbs I go into deep ketosis and can't eat enough. Above 20 I eat about 1500 cal below 20 I struggle to eat more then 700 cal. Before ketosis I'd eat 3-5k calories a day. Isn't ketosis grand :-)

  3. Monkeyslim

    No. Some few people, mostly athletes, can eat up to about a 100g carbs. As long as you feel good, and are keeping calories in the range to lose if that's your goal, then consider yourself very fortunate. Wish I could have over 20g.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

What is metabolic acidosis? The buildup of acid in the body due to kidney disease or kidney failure is called metabolic acidosis. When your body fluids contain too much acid, it means that your body is either not getting rid of enough acid, is making too much acid, or cannot balance the acid in your body. What causes metabolic acidosis? Healthy kidneys have many jobs. One of these jobs is to keep the right balance of acids in the body. The kidneys do this by removing acid from the body through urine. Metabolic acidosis is caused by a build-up of too many acids in the blood. This happens when your kidneys are unable to adequately remove the acid from your blood. What are the signs and symptoms? Not everyone will have signs or symptoms. However, you may experience: Long and deep breaths Fast heartbeat Headache and/or confusion Weakness Feeling very tired Vomiting and/or feeling sick to your stomach (nausea) Loss of appetite If you experience any of these, it is important to let your healthcare provider know immediately. What are the complications of metabolic acidosis if I have kidney disease or kidney failure? Increased bone loss (osteoporosis): Metabolic acidosis can lead to a loss Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Flowerbomb90

    Intermittent fasting and keto

    Ok if I workout in a fasted state, is it a must that I take BCAAS beforehand? Also, let's say I fasted from 12 am until around 9:30 pm (post workout). My workout would be around 7:30-8 and over shortly after 9. My first meal would be then and last meal around 11 something. I have no problem eating large amounts of food at once (yeah, such talent....) but believe my workouts are better with little to no food sitting in my stomach. So I would have like a 3 hour eating window or something like that. Does that really matter? I just don't want to worry about food as much. Any thoughts/advice? I will do a keto with this also since high fat kills any cravings I have versus consuming carbs so often.

  2. AJBurns

    If your doing it wrong, your body will tell you.
    I'm doing a keto based diet with 1 large meal + a few protein shakes and loving it. Strength is up while losing weight and feel amazing. Everyone is different.
    You don't need BCAAS before your workout. 12am to 9:30pm is a bit long for my tastes but up to you if you don't feel like your losing strength in the gym with it.

  3. holysmokes700

    BCAA's won't make or break your success...but working out completely fasted may make you more prone to injury and hinder your recovery.
    Current accepted fact is the following: meal time is irrelevant, as well as macronutrient composition of individual meals, as long as macros add up on a daily (or weekly for some) basis. Obviously micro's matter too, but that's just common sense. Having said that...that doesn't mean that training fasted is a good idea.
    That's my advice, but curious to hear a different opinion on this.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In this video I discuss what is metabolic rate, how to calculate metabolic rate, and how to calculate calories burned, and how many calories burned in a day. I also discuss basal metabolic rate, and resting metabolic rate. Transcript (partial with notes) In this video, I am going to show you the formula on how to calculate your calories burned in a day (metabolic rate). And give some examples. Lets start off with the term metabolic rate. In this video we are defining metabolic rate as the amount of calories you would burn off in a day (24 hours) while at rest. So, not moving around or being active. In the fitness community, There are 2 popular formulas to calculate this. BMR, basal metabolic rate, and RMR, resting metabolic rate. BMR is taken after 8 hours of sleep and 12 hours of fasting. RMR is taken under less restrictions, and has been shown to be statistically more accurate. Lets look at a couple of examples. Here we have kyle and Samantha, and their metrics are here. Kyle is 44 yrs old, is 58 tall, and weighs 160 pounds. Samantha is 33 yrs old, 54 tall, and weighs 126 pounds. The RMR equation for men is (4.55 x Weight in pounds) + (15.88 x Height in inches) - (5*age) + 5, for women the equation is (4.55 x Weight in pounds) + (15.88 x Height in inches) - (5*age) -161. When we plug in Kyles and Sams #s, we see that Kyles RMR is 1592.84 cal/day, and Sams is 1263.62 cal/day. So, after rounding up, this tells us that if Kyle and Sam were to sit around all day, they would need 1583 and 1264 calories per day to maintain their weights. We know that neither Kyle or Samantha are going to sit around all day. So there is a multiplication factor that we must use next. It is based on each of their lifestyles. The factor is as follows 1.200 = sedentary (little or no exercise) 1.375 = lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week, approx. 590 Cal/day) 1.550 = moderately active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week, approx. 870 Cal/day) 1.725 = very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week, approx. 1150 Cal/day) 1.900 = extra active (very hard exercise/sports and physical job, approx. 1580 Cal/day) Lets say Kyle is very sedentary, so if we multiply his RMR by 1.2 we have .1911.6 cal/day. Now, Samantha is in the very active category, so we need to multiply her RMR by 1.725, and we get2180.4 cal/day . So, based on these calculations Kyle can consume 1912 calories per day to maintain his current weight, and Samantha can consume 2180 calories per day to maintain her weight. Now, You can use the RMR equation and lifestyle multiplication factor to calculate your baseline. Drawbacks A few of things I need to mention. First, this and any other formula used to calculate your metabolic rate is just an estimate. There is a margin for error. Second, muscle mass is very important. Lets look at Kyle, and Jack, who both weigh the same. However, Jack has much more muscle mass than K, since muscle burns more calories than fat, J will have a higher metabolic rate. Third, the type of diet ( for example consuming whole vs processed foods) is not factored either. Bottom Line I dont believe that counting calories is a path to successfully sustaining weight loss in the long run. However, Using the RMR formula and the lifestyle multiplication factor is extremely helpful in increasing your awareness to how many calories you need to consume per day. Which In turn can lead to a higher awareness of how quickly calories you consume add up. Other sources... http://www.scientificpsychic.com/heal... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15...

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis Definition Metabolic acidosis is a pH imbalance in which the body has accumulated too much acid and does not have enough bicarbonate to effectively neutralize the effects of the acid. Description Metabolic acidosis, as a disruption of the body's acid/base balance, can be a mild symptom brought on by a lack of insulin, a starvation diet, or a gastrointestinal disorder like vomiting and diarrhea. Metabolic acidosis can indicate a more serious problem with a major organ like the liver, heart, or kidneys. It can also be one of the first signs of drug overdose or poisoning. Causes and symptoms Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body has more acid than base in it. Chemists use the term "pH" to describe how acidic or basic a substance is. Based on a scale of 14, a pH of 7.0 is neutral. A pH below 7.0 is an acid; the lower the number, the stronger the acid. A pH above 7.0 is a base; the higher the number, the stronger the base. Blood pH is slightly basic (alkaline), with a normal range of 7.36-7.44. Acid is a natural by-product of the breakdown of fats and other processes in the body; however, in some conditions, the body does not have enough bicarbonate, an acid neutral Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. dietcherry

    THE DANGERS OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    This serious complication, the result of acid buildup in the blood, can lead to coma or even death.
    If you have type 1 diabetes, one of the serious complications you may face is a condition known as ketoacidosis. In diabetic ketoacidosis, acids called ketones build up in your blood and could eventually lead to diabetic coma or death.
    But by vigilantly controlling your diabetes and watching for early signs of ketoacidosis, you can help prevent it from happening to you.
    What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?
    "When blood sugars get elevated and there is not enough insulin, your fat cells start to break down their storage sites of energy, which are called ketones," says Jay Cohen, MD, medical director of the Endocrine Clinic and clinical assistant professor in the department of family medicine at the University of Tennessee. Ketones are acidic, and that acid builds up in your blood.
    Diabetic ketoacidosis is found more often in younger people than older people, and more often in women than in men. At least 20 percent of people learn they have diabetes after seeking medical care for complaints that turn out to be symptoms of ketoacidosis.
    Common Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    The three common causes of ketoacidosis are:
    Not enough insulin. This can happen if you don’t inject enough insulin or if your insulin needs increase in response to an illness such as a cold or the flu. Blood glucose can’t be used for energy without enough insulin to help in the process, so the body breaks down fat for energy and high ketone levels result.
    "Elevated blood sugars could be due to an infection or any other physical or emotional stress — good or bad," says Dr. Cohen. Unexpected increases in your blood glucose levels can increase your insulin needs. "You may have a certain amount of insulin that you usually use, but if you have an infection, you may need more insulin to help your body to improve blood sugars," Cohen explains.
    Not enough food intake. If you don’t eat enough, your body has to break down fat for energy, producing high ketone levels. This is particularly common in people who are sick and don't feel like eating.
    Low blood glucose levels. This situation can force your body to break down fat to use as energy, resulting in ketone production.
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms
    Symptoms of ketoacidosis usually progress relatively slowly. But since diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition, it is important to seek medical help immediately if you experience any of its symptoms. These include:
    Excessive thirst
    Dry mouth
    Frequent urination
    Elevated blood glucose levels
    Elevated ketones in the urine
    Persistent fatigue
    Skin that is dry or flushed
    Nausea or vomiting
    Pain in your abdomen
    Shortness of breath
    A fruity smell to your breath (the result of elevated ketone levels)
    Inability to concentrate
    Confused state
    Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Ask your endocrinologist how you can reduce your risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. It is often a good idea to use a home dipstick test to check for ketones in your urine when your blood glucose levels are high (over 240 milligrams per deciliter) and when you have an infection.
    Diabetes education also helps. One study found that hospital stays for ketoacidosis were reduced among a group of people who attended diabetes education classes.
    Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    If think you may have ketoacidosis, it is essential to contact your doctor or get to the emergency room immediately.
    "If we can catch it early, with medicine and IV fluids, we can stop the diabetic ketoacidosis from progressing to severe dehydration," says Cohen. "Diabetic ketoacidosis, if severe and not treated aggressively, has about a 5 percent death rate, so you really want to get a handle on it rapidly."
    Remember that regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels, performing urine ketone tests as recommended, and recognizing symptoms that might indicate your ketone levels are high is the best approach to reducing your risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.
    From Everyday Health

  2. Gem93

    I recently had a friend that got DKA she only had ketones for a day and was bring violently sick she couldn't test for ketones as her strips were left at her uni campus and went home to visit her family for the weekend her mum was just about to leave to go get the strips when she said I don't feel well take me to hospital betime she got to hospital ( which is a 10 min drive from where she lives) her vains had short down and the only vain left was the one to her heart they had to cut her throat open to put in an insulin drip immediately and was put in intensive care her family was told she might not make it and that was from having ketone symptoms for just a few hours / day at the most .. This has woken me up to life alot Snd made me realise what can happen if you don't look after yourself

  3. dietcherry

    OMG Can you get her to join here so we may talk to her?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Metabolic Acidosis And Metabolic Alkalosis Ppt

    Metabolic alkalosis is a metabolic condition in which the pH of tissue is elevated beyond the normal range (7.35–7.45). This is the result of decreased hydrogen ion concentration, leading to increased bicarbonate, or alternatively a direct result of increased bicarbonate concentrations. Terminology[edit] Alkalosis refers to a process by which the pH is increased. Alkalemia refers to a pH which is higher than normal, specifically in the blood. C ...

    ketosis Apr 29, 2018
  • Which Metabolic Rate Resulted In Metabolic Acidosis?

    Respiratory alkalosis is a medical condition in which increased respiration elevates the blood pH beyond the normal range (7.35–7.45) with a concurrent reduction in arterial levels of carbon dioxide.[1][3] This condition is one of the four basic categories of disruption of acid–base homeostasis.[medical citation needed] Signs and symptoms[edit] Signs and symptoms of respiratory alkalosis are as follows:[4] Palpitation Tetany Convulsion Sweati ...

    ketosis Jan 11, 2018
  • Metabolic Acidosis Causes

    When your body fluids contain too much acid, it’s known as acidosis. Acidosis occurs when your kidneys and lungs can’t keep your body’s pH in balance. Many of the body’s processes produce acid. Your lungs and kidneys can usually compensate for slight pH imbalances, but problems with these organs can lead to excess acid accumulating in your body. The acidity of your blood is measured by determining its pH. A lower pH means that your blood ...

    ketosis Apr 22, 2018
  • What Causes Metabolic Acidosis

    What keeps your blood from becoming too acidic or basic? How does the body control this? Read this lesson to learn about what happens when this balance is overthrown and the blood becomes too acidic, in a scenario called metabolic acidosis. Your body needs to stay approximately around a given equilibrium to function normally. There is a little bit of wiggle room, but not much, and when things go awry, the body begins to suffer. Our blood is liter ...

    ketosis Mar 24, 2018
  • What Are The Causes Of Metabolic Acidosis And Alkalosis?

    INTRODUCTION Metabolic alkalosis, a disorder that elevates the serum bicarbonate, can result from several mechanisms: intracellular shift of hydrogen ions; gastrointestinal loss of hydrogen ions; excessive renal hydrogen ion loss; administration and retention of bicarbonate ions; or volume contraction around a constant amount of extracellular bicarbonate (contraction alkalosis) (table 1) [1-4]. Hydrogen ions are derived from the dissociation of w ...

    ketosis Apr 2, 2018
  • What Causes Metabolic Acidosis In Renal Failure?

    Metabolic acidosis and kidney disease: does bicarbonate therapy slow the progression of CKD? Correspondence and offprint requests to: Csaba P. Kovesdy; E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 27, Issue 8, 1 August 2012, Pages 30563062, Csaba P. Kovesdy; Metabolic acidosis and kidney disease: does bicarbonate therapy slow the progression of CKD?, Nephrology Dialysis Transp ...

    ketosis Apr 9, 2018

More in ketosis