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Metabolic Acidosis And Alkalosis

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What is ALKALOSIS? What does ALKALOSIS mean? ALKALOSIS meaning - ALKALOSIS pronunciation - ALKALOSIS definition - ALKALOSIS explanation - How to pronounce ALKALOSIS? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Alkalosis is the result of a process reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia). In contrast to acidemia (serum pH 7.35 or lower), alkalemia occurs when the serum pH is higher than normal (7.45 or higher). Alkalosis is usually divided into the categories of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic alkalosis or a combined respiratory/metabolic alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation, resulting in a loss of carbon dioxide. Compensatory mechanisms for this would include increased dissociation of the carbonic acid buffering intermediate into hydrogen ions, and the related excretion of bicarbonate, both of which lower blood pH. Hyperventilation-induced alkalosis can be seen in several deadly central nervous system diseases such as strokes or Rett syndrome. Metabolic alkalosis can be caused by rep

Acidosis/alkalosis:

Bases: Have a higher affinity for protons than water and easily acquire protons in aqueous solution. charged (+1) when protonated (Acids uncharged) uncharged when de-protonated (Acids -1 charge) Most common biological weak base is the amino group, -NH2 Despite the differences between acids and bases the pKa concept can be used to quantitate the relative strength of amino groups. Notice: pKa values for carboxylic acid are less than < 7, pka values for amino groups are >7 (usually 9-11) i.e. a simple biologically important 10 amine, ethanolamine, pKa = 9.5 or choline, a quaternary (40) amine, pKa = 13.9 Choline is a good compound for systems in which a permanent positive charge is desirable, i.e. membranes (hydrophilic head groups) Phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) a key amphiphilic compound in biological membranes Buffering: At or near their pKa both weak acids and weak bases will resist changes in pH, thus acting as buffers Buffering is very important in biological systems, for rapid pH changes have disastrous consequences. The buffering capacity of ethanolamine and acetic acid occur well outside of the pH range normally seen in human blood (pH 7.35-7.45). Thus, other ionizable compou Continue reading >>

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  1. sonias

    3 This is my topic for this week in nursing school, respiratory & metabolic acidosis/ alkalosis. I am having trouble breaking it down. Can someone please help me understand this please? Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

  2. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

  3. Esme12

    Check out this tutorial
    Interactive Online ABG's acid base

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Do you know how to get rid of gas pains? Find out how to get rid of gas pains in video , check What To Do For Gas Pains ! Many people suffer from severe GAS PAINS and it usually occurs when you eat too much food and allow air to enter into the stomach. The pains can also be brought on by leaving your stomach empty for a long time and drinking aerated drinks. Whatever may be the cause of GAS, the PAIN is uncomfortable and at times it can be excruciating. However, there are ways to handle and cope with gas pains. find out How To Get Rid Of Gas Pains Learn how to get rid of gas, and get tips on how to prevent it. Having gas pains are very uncomfortable and irritating feeling. Several factors cause gas pains such as belching, flatulence, abdominal bloating and distention, and abdominal pain and pressure. If ever you are feeling gassy and bloated, there are some remedies on how you can get rid of gas pain in back How To Get Rid Of Gas Pains | Stomach Gas Pain | What To Do For Gas Pains Gas pains often strikes at a most inconvenient time, which is why simple remedies must be at hand for unexpected discomforts such as gas and bloating. Before effective treatment for gas pain can be undert

Blood Gas Analysis, Pt 5: Metabolic Acidosis And Alkalosis

Base excess (BE) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) represent the metabolic components of the acid base equation. In general, both components will change in the same direction. Decreased HCO3– and BE indicate either a primary metabolic acidosis or a metabolic compensation for a chronic respiratory alkalosis. Elevated HCO3– and BE indicate either a primary metabolic alkalosis or a metabolic compensation for a chronic respiratory acidosis. The exception to this rule arises when a patient hypoventilates or hyperventilates. Carbonic acid equation CO2 + H2O ↔ H2CO3 ↔ HCO3– + H+ When a patient hypoventilates, CO2 will increase as a result of reduced expiration, so a shift to the right of the equilibrium will occur. The shift to the right will increase the bicarbonate levels proportional to the increase in CO2. The opposite occurs when a patient hyperventilates; the equilibrium shifts to the left, so a decrease in HCO3– is present. Since HCO3– is not independent to the patient’s respiratory status, it is an inaccurate way of measuring the metabolic component in patients with respiratory changes. For this reason, the BE value is the preferred. The BE represents the amount of acid, or Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sonias

    3 This is my topic for this week in nursing school, respiratory & metabolic acidosis/ alkalosis. I am having trouble breaking it down. Can someone please help me understand this please? Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

  2. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

  3. Esme12

    Check out this tutorial
    Interactive Online ABG's acid base

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In this video I discuss why does the body need calcium, how much calcium does the body need, and what does calcium do in the body. Transcript Calcium is a macro mineral and is the most abundant mineral in the human body. Its functions include the mineralization of bones and teeth, it also helps in nerve functioning, and assists in the contraction and relaxation of muscles. It also help in regulating blood pressure, blood clotting, and overall immune system health. Food sources of calcium include cow’s milk products, small fish with bones such as salmon, green leafy vegetables, and legumes. since most people do not consume enough calcium consumption can be a concern. Calcium consumption is a concern since most people do not consume enough. Calcium deficiency can cause reduced bones mass and strength in children and it can lead to ostemalacia, osteopenia, and osteoporosis in adults. The recommended daily intake for calcium for men and women is 1000 mg per day. Toxicity can occur as low as 2.5 g per day depending on the individual. Side effects at high doses include nausea, vomiting, kidney damage, and irregular heart rhythm.

Laboratory Investigation Effects Of Metabolic Acidosis And Alkalosis On Sodium And Calcium Transport In The Dog Kidney

Effects of metabolic acidosis and alkalosis on sodium and calcium transport in the dog kidney. Clearance and micropuncture studies have been performed in dogs to examine the effects of acute and chronic metabolic acidosis and acute alkalosis on tubular sodium and calcium transport. Acute metabolic acidosis, induced by the infusion of hydrochloric acid, decreased proximal fluid reabsorption and increased the fractional delivery of sodium and calcium to the distal tubule, but not to the final urine. In comparison with normal dogs, dogs with chronic metabolic acidosis (induced by feeding ammonium chloride) showed an increase in proximal fluid reabsorption and a dissociation of calcium from sodium reabsorption more distally, leading to an increased delivery of calcium relative to sodium at the distal tubule and in the final urine. The infusion of sodium bicarbonate to correct chronic metabolic acidosis, both in intact and thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) dogs, reduced proximal fluid reabsorption and caused a selective enhancement of calcium reabsorption relative to sodium in the more distal nephron, resulting in a reversal of the dissociation observed in acidosis, both at the distal tu Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sonias

    3 This is my topic for this week in nursing school, respiratory & metabolic acidosis/ alkalosis. I am having trouble breaking it down. Can someone please help me understand this please? Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

  2. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

  3. Esme12

    Check out this tutorial
    Interactive Online ABG's acid base

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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