diabetestalk.net

Metabolic Acidosis Alcohol Intoxication

Share on facebook

What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Emergent Treatment Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Emergent Treatment of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Author: Adam Blumenberg, MD, MA; Chief Editor: Erik D Schraga, MD more... Alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) is an acute metabolic acidosis seen in persons with a recent history of binge drinking and little or no nutritional intake. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is characterized by high serum ketone levels and an elevated anion gap (see the Anion Gap calculator). A concomitant metabolic alkalosis is also common, resulting from vomiting and volume depletion. Although AKA most commonly occurs in adults with alcoholism, alcoholic ketoacidosis has been reported in less-experienced drinkers of all ages. [ 1 , 2 ] Go to Alcoholic Ketoacidosis , Metabolic Alkalosis , and Pediatric Metabolic Alkalosis for complete information on these topics. Assess the patient's airway and manage as clinically indicated. Administer oxygen as indicated. Obtain intravenous access and administer fluid resuscitation for volume depletion and/or hypotension. Consider and treat hypoglycemia. [ 3 ] If the patient's mental status is diminished, consider administration of naloxone and thiamine . Note information about the patient's social situation and the presence of intoxicating a Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. laurenschofield

    I started the Keto Diet about a week ago, and have definitely been experiencing the "Keto Flu", which I've read about and was ready for. I wasn't ready for a sore throat, though. For the last three days, I've been experiencing the lump-in-the-throat/difficult-to-swallow feeling, like when you get a cold. I'm drinking more than enough water, and hot lemon water helps quite a bit.
    My question is, has anyone else experienced this as a side effect? If so, any way to quell it? Does it go away after a bit? I've done some internet research, but it hasn't pulled up much. Thank you!

  2. grndzro

    You also need electrolytes. not just water.
    Eat 2 bricks of spinach, and take a tsp of lite salt.
    Get some exercise to burn off excess ketones.
    Have a cup of milk.

  3. laurenschofield

    Originally Posted by grndzro
    You also need electrolytes. not just water.
    Eat 2 bricks of spinach, and take a tsp of lite salt.
    Get some exercise to burn off excess ketones.
    Have a cup of milk.

    Excellent, thank you! I'm exercising 5/week, so we're set there. I'll down some spinach tomorrow (gonna leave the milk though, it doesn't agree with my lactose intolerance!)

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Metabolic Abnormalities In Alcoholic Patients: Focus On Acid Base And Electrolyte Disorders

1Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece 2Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 451 10, Ioannina, Greece *Corresponding Author: Moses Elisaf Professor of Internal Medicine Department of Medicine, Medical School University of Ioannina 451 10 Ioannina, Greece Tel: +302651007509 Fax: +302651007016 E-mail: [email protected], [email protected] Citation: Moses Elisaf MD, Rigas Kalaitzidis MD (2015) Metabolic Abnormalities in Alcoholic Patients: Focus on Acid Base and Electrolyte Disorders. J Alcohol Drug Depend 3:185. doi:10.4172/2329-6488.1000185 Copyright: ©2015 Moses Elisaf MD, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Alcoholism & Drug Dependence Abstract Alcoholic patients commonly develop a variety of acid-base and electrolyte disturbances. The aim of this review is to describe the most commonly encountered abnormalities and their significant role in the patients’ mo Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. thedoctor_89

    Hey everyone. I have a question for you. After losing 70 lb in half a year i decided to stop keto. I like it but i want to move on to something else. Is there anyway that i could stop keto with gaining weight from carbs. Im prepared to spend a month to do this if i have to.

  2. jrf_1973

    Eh, not really. When you go low carb and lose the water weight in the first week, that is weight you will put back on once you reintroduce carbs.
    Basically your body will build back its reserves of glycogen, and that glycogen will store water. There's no way to avoid that.

  3. thefoxman88

    Can always go a few lb below your goal so when you go back to normal you are at your goal weight.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

(Please Turn On "Annotations" From YouTube Settings) A brief video about Thalassaemia to refresh the memories of my students with a dose of pathology ! Topics Include: -Definition, -Classification, -Role of Genetics in Thalassemia, -Pathophysiology of Alpha and Beta Thalassemia, -Clinical Features, -Main Findings in Blood Picture, -Target Cells, -How and why Target Cells Formed in Thalassemia, -Role of Parvo virus B19 in thalassemia, -Treatment and complications. Hope some one finds this helpful. - Dr. Rabiul

Toxic Alcohol Ingestions: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, And Management

Abstract Alcohol-related intoxications, including methanol, ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and propylene glycol, and alcoholic ketoacidosis can present with a high anion gap metabolic acidosis and increased serum osmolal gap, whereas isopropanol intoxication presents with hyperosmolality alone. The effects of these substances, except for isopropanol and possibly alcoholic ketoacidosis, are due to their metabolites, which can cause metabolic acidosis and cellular dysfunction. Accumulation of the alcohols in the blood can cause an increment in the osmolality, and accumulation of their metabolites can cause an increase in the anion gap and a decrease in serum bicarbonate concentration. The presence of both laboratory abnormalities concurrently is an important diagnostic clue, although either can be absent, depending on the time after exposure when blood is sampled. In addition to metabolic acidosis, acute renal failure and neurologic disease can occur in some of the intoxications. Dialysis to remove the unmetabolized alcohol and possibly the organic acid anion can be helpful in treatment of several of the alcohol-related intoxications. Administration of fomepizole or ethanol to i Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Timothy

    I recently told my friend, a professor of medicine at a large university, about my six-week-old PB eating habits (now largely carnivorous). He advised me that it's not good to keep your body "carb-starved" and in ketosis all the time, and that eating so much protein strains the liver's ability to produce urea and the kidneys' ability to process and excrete it. The long-term effects can include liver and kidney damage, he said.
    I've heard something like this before, but it seems to run counter to the research on MDA as well as the experiences of real-life carnivores.
    Do you know anyone who has sustained kidney/liver damage from eating too much protein? Is Tarlach on course for renal failure? Or is this just CW run amok again?

  2. Athena

    1
    Ive heard it from bodybuilders who eat ungodly amounts of protein (mostly from powders) that they have kidney problems. I always heard as long as you keep hydrated your kidneys shouldnt have an issue, especially if u get your protein from meat sources. Although I can't back that up with anything other than broscience. Im interested to see some evidence though

  3. Prowler

    1
    Absolute bull.
    1. What is the incidence of liver or kidney damage among the Inuit practicing their traditional diet?
    2. What is the incidence of liver or kidney damage among the Masai practicing their traditional diet?
    3. The venerable Dr. Atkins himself used ketosis to treat thousands of patients at his clinic over the course of several decades, and he challenged anyone to show one case where ketosis caused kidney damage. Not one case has ever been documented.
    Case closed. Ketosis is a safe and natural state, and any speculation about potential harm is just that: pure unfounded speculation.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Which Metabolic Rate Resulted In Metabolic Acidosis?

    The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. Acidosis is classified as either respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of acidosis is usually caused when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through bre ...

    ketosis Jan 11, 2018
  • Respiratory Acidosis And Metabolic Acidosis At The Same Time

    both respiratory and metabolic acidosis - possible? could this be possible example ABG reading: how do u describe this? compensated or non. I think it is partially compensated metabolic acidosis. It is not fully compensated, as the ph would have to be normal for that to be so. I could be wrong but as I remember it, if the ph and hco3 are going in the same direction (both are going down = acidosis) then it is a metabolic problem. If I am wrong, s ...

    ketosis Apr 29, 2018
  • Metabolic Acidosis Alcohol Intoxication

    Abstract Alcohol-related intoxications, including methanol, ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and propylene glycol, and alcoholic ketoacidosis can present with a high anion gap metabolic acidosis and increased serum osmolal gap, whereas isopropanol intoxication presents with hyperosmolality alone. The effects of these substances, except for isopropanol and possibly alcoholic ketoacidosis, are due to their metabolites, which can cause metabolic ...

    ketosis May 3, 2018
  • Metabolic Acidosis And Metabolic Alkalosis Ppt

    DuBose TD, Jr.. DuBose T.D., Jr. DuBose, Thomas D., Jr.Chapter 47. Acidosis and Alkalosis. In: Longo DL, Fauci AS, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Jameson J, Loscalzo J. Longo D.L., Fauci A.S., Kasper D.L., Hauser S.L., Jameson J, Loscalzo J Eds. Dan L. Longo, et al.eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 18e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2012. Accessed April 24, 2018. DuBose TD, Jr.. DuBose T.D., Jr. DuBose, Thomas D., Jr.. "Chapter 47. Acidosis an ...

    ketosis Apr 29, 2018
  • Respiratory Acidosis Vs Metabolic Acidosis

    Watch short & fun videos Start Your Free Trial Today Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course. Custom Courses are courses that you create from Study.com lessons. Use them just like other courses to track progress, access quizzes and exams, and share content. Organize and share selected lessons with your class. Make planning easier by creating your own custom course. Create a new course from any lesson page or your dashboard. Click ...

    ketosis Apr 30, 2018
  • Can Alcohol Cause Metabolic Acidosis?

    What is alcoholic ketoacidosis? Cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin to function properly. Glucose comes from the food you eat, and insulin is produced by the pancreas. When you drink alcohol, your pancreas may stop producing insulin for a short time. Without insulin, your cells won’t be able to use the glucose you consume for energy. To get the energy you need, your body will start to burn fat. When your body burns fat for energy, byproducts ...

    ketosis Mar 31, 2018

More in ketosis