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Maintenance After Keto

How To Become A Fat-burning Machine With The Ketogenic Diet

How To Become A Fat-burning Machine With The Ketogenic Diet

Perhaps the most immediate and dramatic benefit of ketogenic eating is the opportunity for quick and efficient reduction of excess body fat. This also means easy, long-term maintenance of your ideal body composition. Ketogenic eating can make you an efficient fat-burning machine. When you are in full-blown keto, you enjoy complete dietary satisfaction, rarely feel hungry (even if you skip meals!), and never have to struggle, suffer, restrict calories, or force strenuous workouts in order to burn extra calories. Instead, you allow your body to naturally calibrate you to a healthy composition and weight. The scientists, medical professionals, and athletes on the ground floor of the keto movement can barely contain their excitement over its power to reliably reduce excess body fat, enhance neurological function, protect against diseases of cognitive decline, and slow the rate of inflammation and oxidative damage that are the essence of the (accelerated) aging process. Research has suggested it's also able to help prevent seizures, halt the growth of cancerous tumors, and improve athletic performance for all types of athletes.1 In essence, ketogenic eating allows you to benefit from the extraordinary (and scientifically validated) metabolic efficiency, general health, and longevity benefits of fasting—without having to starve yourself. When you're starving, engaging in a purposeful fast, or adhering to a nutritional ketosis eating pattern, your cells prefer to burn fat and produce ketones. Ketones burn efficiently and quickly in the body. In fact, they have been the preferred human fuels in our body for 2.5 million years of our hunter-gatherer existence.2 On the other hand, the high-carb, high-insulin-producing Standard American Diet (SAD) causes you to burn glucose (also Continue reading >>

8 Common Misconceptions About Ketogenic Diets

8 Common Misconceptions About Ketogenic Diets

8 Common Misconceptions About Ketogenic Diets Trashing ketogenic diets has become a trend in some areas. Most use the studies from years ago that reportedly “prove” their points. This post is intended to clear up the “8 common misconceptions about ketogenic diets” and inaccuracies of those studies and posts. First of all I want to state that you can “prove” almost anything by searching studies. A study can have flawed techniques, later dis-proven by other studies, and much more but the study is still there. One example is the study linking stevia to infertility in mice from 1968. It has since been dis-proven many times but people will still do posts trashing stevia and point to that study as “Proof”. That is why Maria and I rely on only the latest science and look at every study with a critical eye (what were the methods, who funded the study, how was the diet formulated, how long was the study run). We rely on outcomes much more than any study. Outcomes are “has my client improved as a result of my recommendations?”. That is what really counts and is why, in addition to some study examples, we will also list testimonies (outcomes) from clients. 1. What is a Ketogenic Diet? This is one of the biggest areas of misunderstanding among bloggers and in scientific studies. Just like any diet or lifestyle you have to have a well formulated plan for it to be effective. With a ketogenic lifestyle this is as important as with any diet. That is why I like to say “Well Formulated Ketogenic Diet” when talking about this lifestyle. A well formulated ketogenic diet consists of high fat (70-80% of calories), moderate protein (15-20% of calories) and low carbohydrate (5% or less of calories). This is where many of the studies cited by the critics of ketogenic die Continue reading >>

How A Low-carb, High-fat Lifestyle Can Help End Yo-yo Dieting

How A Low-carb, High-fat Lifestyle Can Help End Yo-yo Dieting

Anyone who has tried at least one diet plan is probably familiar with the yo-yo effect – a term commonly used to describe those exasperating cycles of weight loss and regain. At the start of a new diet or different exercise program, individuals often see great results. However, improvements typically wane after a few weeks, resulting in the dreaded plateau and numbers on a scale that creep back up to, or even above, their original weight. Furthermore, recent research suggests this pattern isn’t just frustrating, but also a serious potential health threat. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that “fluctuation in body weight was associated with higher mortality and a higher rate of cardiovascular events independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors.”1 So why do we get stuck in this rut of ups and downs? Our bodies’ own survival mechanisms are to blame. We tend to think of our metabolism as a simple bank account of calories. When we lose substantial amounts of weight, our metabolic rate starts to slow down,2,3 meaning we don’t burn as many calories throughout the day. Fat loss also tends to increase circulating levels of appetite hormones,4 making hunger and cravings even worse. A high-fat, low-carb diet shows promise as a sustainable means of weight-maintenance by addressing these two critical factors: (1) Maintaining metabolic rate and (2) Attenuating drastic fluctuations in appetite hormones. Cutting the string on the yo-yo effect Researchers wanted to examine the effects of dietary composition on energy expenditure during weight-loss maintenance by comparing 3 different diets differing in macronutrient composition and glycemic load. The study involved 21 overweight adults who were followed between 2006 and 2010. After achieving Continue reading >>

I Just Started Ketogenic Diet. I'm Losing Weight, But Once I Reach Target Weight, Is There A Way I Can Go Back Into A More Normal Diet That's Not Super High Carb Of Course, But Perhaps A Bowl Of Rice A Day Without Gaining The Weight Back?

I Just Started Ketogenic Diet. I'm Losing Weight, But Once I Reach Target Weight, Is There A Way I Can Go Back Into A More Normal Diet That's Not Super High Carb Of Course, But Perhaps A Bowl Of Rice A Day Without Gaining The Weight Back?

Sure. Paoli et al. did just that in a research study back in 2013. He had participants do 20 days of ketogenic dieting and then transitioned them to a low carb, high protein diet, and then finally had them on a Mediterranean diet – a moderate intake of fats, carbs, and protein for six months. They repeated this process. They found that during the bouts of keto, the participants lost body fat and maintained that loss throughout the transition to the Mediterranean diet. The key to transitioning successfully without gaining body fat – depending on how long you were in ketosis, insulin resistance can be a problem – is to take the transition slow. Meaning, don’t go from ~12 g carbs straight to 200g. Here’s what I’d recommend: One way to do this is is to slowly add 20-30 grams of carbs per week while holding your fat and protein intake where they are, until you’re out of a deficit and back to maintenance. As an example. Let’s assume you end the diet at 1700 calories. And you want to start bringing your calorie intake back up to your new maintenance of 2300 calories. This is how I would do it. If you’re end of diet macros were: 150g protein / 50g carbs/110g fat. Week 1:​ +20 grams carbs/ keep fats as they are / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 70g carbs / 110g fats (1870 calories) Week 2: ​+30 grams carbs/keep fats as they are/ protein stays the same – 150g protein / 100g carbs / 110g fats (1990 calories) Week 3: ​+30 grams carbs/ fat remains the same / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 130g carbs / 110g fats (2110 calories) Week 4: ​+30 grams carbs/ fat remains the same / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 160g carbs / 110g fats (2230 calories) At this point you can either keep things as they are, or start reducing fat intak Continue reading >>

How To Come Off Of A Fat Loss Or Ketogenic Diet Correctly

How To Come Off Of A Fat Loss Or Ketogenic Diet Correctly

Diets by definition are temporary. This is what gets a lot of people in trouble because there is a defined time frame of when they monitor their caloric intake, and once that time period is up it’s easy to undo all the progress one made in just a few short weeks by returning to old eating habits. So while an individual reaches adequate levels of weight and fat loss during their diet, they can quickly gain back all the weight and fat they lost initially if not more. This leads to a false sense of morality tied into people’s nutrition and outrageous claims of people blaming their genetics for their body composition because “I’ve tried every diet and nothing works for me.” Well…I am here to tell you that you don’t have to fall into this viscous cycle as long as you know how to properly come off of either a fat loss or ketogenic diet. REVERSE DIETING. Boom – two key words is all it takes. Reverse dieting means there is a strategic and slow increase of either calories or specific macronutrients back into one’s every day nutrition versus an all-out binge returning to eating whatever anyone wants because “they earned it” – this will LIMIT (not eliminate) fat gain as you add calories back into the mix (because let’s face it – NO ONE wants to be in a caloric deficit year round!). So yes, calorie or macronutrient (i.e. protein, fat, carbs) counting must continue. Fail to take this phase of your diet into account and your scale numbers will skyrocket before you can think twice. So….hopefully you have followed a proper diet protocol meaning you didn’t start your diet at an absurdly low calorie count with high workload. Like your weight training, diets should be progressive – meaning the longer your diet goes you SLOWLY lower your food intake (keep Continue reading >>

Ketosis Done Right–meet Anne

Ketosis Done Right–meet Anne

Today we have an inspiring real world “n=1” example of how a ketogenic diet can be successfully used by a real woman to easily and happily lose weight! I thought it would be nice to give you all a much-deserved break from my own dietary misadventures and stop to appreciate the beauty of a well-done ketogenic diet. My recent experiment with Professor Seyfried’s dietary recommendations for cancer was one of extreme ketosis for the explicit purpose of cancer treatment. However, most people who decide to try a ketogenic diet do so with the goal of losing weight, and they use a more moderate plan, such as the one recommended by Dr.s Phinney and Volek, in their book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, or the one recommended by Dr. Ron Rosedale in his book The Rosedale Diet. It is this kind of plan I intend to try myself soon, motivated in no small part by my friend Anne, who has successfully applied ketogenic dietary theory to her own life, and who has generously agreed to share her inspirational story here with us. But first, a bit of context. On a beautiful autumn day last October, I was sitting on a beach in picturesque Rockport, Massachusetts with two friends, babbling incessantly about some of the talks I had heard at the 2012 Ancestral Health Symposium, and all the latest things I had been l learning about diet and health, as I am wont to do. Most of my friends and coworkers have learned to deal with this annoying tendency by employing one of two common strategies: Nodding politely and feigning interest, while secretly thinking about far less important things, such as global warming, conflict in the Middle East, and the plight of the piping plover. Disagreeing with my unorthodox dietary philosophies by posing traditional counterarguments, such as “mi Continue reading >>

January Water Fast: What I Ate After Fasting And How Much Did I Gain?

January Water Fast: What I Ate After Fasting And How Much Did I Gain?

It’s been just about 50 hours since I ended my 12 day January Water Fast. (my fast ended on Saturday morning, right now it’s Monday morning) I’ve actually learned so much about my body and my eating habits in such a short period of time that it’s astonishing. First of all – I sincerely love food and even more so love to cook. My kitchen is my happy place and I’m totes happy to be cooking/eating again. However, Eating 3 meals on Saturday was just way too much food. When you complete a water fast the most important aspect to ensure you don’t regain the weight you lost, is to not return to the same eating style you had before your fast (if you weren’t eating healthily) Ray & I are eating low-carb/high-fat in order to maintain our ketogenic state (i.e. fat burning machine. While many people say that you need to end a water fast with soft foods, we took a less traveled path of eating real food. And it was a huge success. Between Ray & I we were on both ends of the spectrum when it comes to digestion — for some it moves a little fast and some it moves a little slow (at the request of my hubby I won’t get into specifics but I’m sure you get my drift) We didn’t feel sick or nauseated – only overfull since undoubtedly our stomaches shrunk in 12 day w/o eating – so any quantity of food would make us feel extra full. And we consciously realized that going forward we need to adjust the way we fill our plates, eating less quantity overall. A secret to keep your portions under control is to use smaller plates – the plates in all of these pictures aren’t full size they are large salad plates. Saturday – 25 g net carbs 9 am Breakfast: 2 Scrambled Eggs, Canadian Bacon, Asparagus, Raw Butter & Sauerkraut – 3g net carbs 1 pm Lunch: cottage cheese, olive Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Guide

Keto Diet Guide

Both my Apps and my first Cookbook include a complete guide to the Ketogenic Diet amongst many other features. Since I get frequently asked about it on my Facebook page, I have decided to share a brief overview of this guide with all of you! What is the Ketogenic Diet? Contrary to general dietary recommendations which have proven to be false, the ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet. It's a diet that causes ketones to be produced by the liver, shifting the body's metabolism away from glucose and towards fat utilization. The ketogenic diet is an effective weight loss tool and has been shown to improve several health conditions such Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy and even cancer. Healthy cells can use ketones for energy, but cancer cells cannot and they literally starve to death. If you want to learn more about the health benefits of the ketogenic diet, my good friend Franziska Spritzler, who also happens to be a qualified dietitian specialising on low-carb nutrition, has written a great article for my blog. How does it work? Very simply said, when you eat food high in carbs, your body produces glucose and insulin. While glucose is used as the main source of energy, insulin secretion is produced to down regulate your glucose levels in the blood stream. Insulin is also responsible for storing fat in our body and if your body produces too much of it, you put on weight. Excessive carbs, typical in modern diets, combined with lack of physical activity will likely result in weight gain. Based on a comparison of several scientific trials, low-carb diets outperform calorie-restricted diets in terms of long-term weight loss and health effects. A common misconception is that our body, especially our brain, needs glucose. Although glucose is known to be Continue reading >>

Maintaining Healthy State Of Ketosis.

Maintaining Healthy State Of Ketosis.

Key takeaways from eating a diet of 70% fat for 30 days. My aim is to encourage you to experiment with your own diet and discover healthier eating habits. When is just as important as what. I got fat eating healthy food. I always assumed eating quality, unprocessed, whole foods makes for a healthy eating lifestyle. But as I ate my way from country-to-country in Southeast Asia, I began to notice pound-after-pound being added to my belly. Kind of strange seeing as I’m price-insensitive to food, cook most my meals and workout often. Sup with that!? Ben might know… As fate would have it, he was in the process of experimenting with the Ketogenic Diet. As he explained to me what he learned, I envied his embodied understanding of how each macronutrient delivers a different form of energy to the body. Say no more … I’m an energy freak, in all aspects. Energy is, and creates, life. So I committed 30 days to the Keto Diet to learn what was somehow skip over in all my health classes: how foods are converted into energy and effects our body. Ketosis in a Nutshell When our body converts food into energy the go-to source is carbohydrates, which break down to glucose. However, our body has evolved to only store a finite amount of glucose (give or take 1600 calories). So after our body is depleted of carbohydrates it needs another source of fuel. So it resorts to fat, which break down into ketone bodies. Ketosis then is a metabolic state in which our body derives energy from fat. And glycolysis is when our body is deriving energy from carbs. So if you eliminate carbohydrates from your diet, your body will enjoy burning both consumed and stored fat for energy. Muscle is spared and fat is burned, that’s ketosis! Our ancestors were big fans of ketosis. In fact, their survival de Continue reading >>

6 Easy Steps For Reintroducing Carbs Without Gaining Weight

6 Easy Steps For Reintroducing Carbs Without Gaining Weight

Have you tried a ketogenic diet and discovered it's not the right diet for you? Me too! Maybe, you've arrived at the Atkins pre-maintenance phase, Phase 3, and are now feeling a bit timid about returning carbs to your diet. This article will help you, too. Either way, reintroducing carbs doesn't mean you have to settle for weight regain. While you do have to be mindful, here's the 6 easy steps I used to reintroduce carbs after leaving ketosis. A traditional low-carb diet is very restrictive. Most plans require you to lower your carbohydrates to less than 50 net carbs per day. Some people enjoy eating mostly protein foods and vegetables, and some do not because along with lowering those carbohydrates, most low-carb plans don't let you eat potatoes, rice, bread, or other starchy foods -- even at higher carb levels. Many people begin missing those higher carb foods, especially if you've never adapted to burning fat for fuel or the weight isn't coming off as easily as you thought it would. While you can always adapt your low-carb meal plan to fit your preferences, most people don't know how to do that. If you used low carb as a temporary, lose-weight-quick solution, you might have discovered that body fat doesn't go away any faster than it does on other diet plans. This can be quite frustrating! The frustration increases even more if you don't have the genetics to easily burn fats for fuel, or you have health conditions that interfere with fat burning. If so, you just won't feel well eating at very low carb levels. No matter what your reasons are for leaving ketosis behind, you have probably found carbohydrate restriction to not be sustainable long term. While some people feel better eating at very low-carb levels, others do not. Regardless of what most low carbers believe, Continue reading >>

The Atkins Diet

The Atkins Diet

The Atkins diet is by far the most famous ketogenic diet. The diet was developed by the late Robert C. Atkins, M.D. in the late 1980s. Unfortunately, and undeservedly, Dr. Atkin's diet has been a public target for the criticism about low carb diets, much of it from people who are ignorant in how the diet actually works. Some people opposed to low carb diets even go so far as to blame Dr. Atkin's death on it, when it reality, he died from a blow to the head, after slipping and falling on an icy sidewalk in Manhattan. Critics spout all kinds of false statements about the Atkins protocol. For instance, it's called a high protein diet, when in reality, it's a high fat, moderate protein, low carbohydrate way of eating. It's not all butter, bacon and cream. It's really just a clean, whole foods diet which includes green vegetables and fresh meat, fish and poultry. For weight loss, short of starving, there is no better method than a ketogenic diet, and for many people, the Atkins protocol is the diet that has worked for successful weight management. Basic Atkins Principles The basic premise of the diet is to lower your carbohydrate intake to a level that allows for weight loss, and then maintain eating that level of carb intake until you lose all the weight you want to lose. As time progresses, you then add more carbs to your diet until you reach a level that stabilizes your weight loss. Maintaining this level of carb intake each day allows you to stay at a lower weight for the rest of your life. It's important to remember that after losing weight on a ketogenic diet, you can't simply go back to your old high carb eating habits and expect to stay at your new weight. The point of finding your maintenance carb level is to know your point of "carbohydrate tolerance". In other wor Continue reading >>

How To Do A Keto Diet After Bariatric Surgery.

How To Do A Keto Diet After Bariatric Surgery.

As you transition to maintenance post-surgery, a Keto diet can help you maintain your healthy weight loss. BariatricEating.com has some important tips on ‘the best of Keto”: Not all parts of the Keto plan are smart for people who have had aggressive stomach altering obesity surgery. There are two versions of Keto and you have to make sure you don’t fall for the FATBRAIN version – that’s the one with the cream cheese, cheddar cheese and bacon with butter poured over everything. Lucky for you that we are both nutrition and bariatric experts to boot – we’ll help you take the Best of Keto that will move you towards life goals and leave the rest behind. Click here to read more. Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

5 Days Of Egg Fast | My Sweet Keto

5 Days Of Egg Fast | My Sweet Keto

A lot of people, especially those on LCHF and keto diets , do 5 Days ofEgg Fast to break their weightloss stall. Surprisingly, it works for a majorityof them if we are to believewhat they report on social networks and forums. I havent been able to find any real scientific explanation to why it works but have my thoughts (that might change in the future if I get more clues). Basically, on an Egg Fast, you only eat eggs , healthy fats, and full-fat cheese for 3 to 5 days in a row. You are supposed to eat at least 6 eggs a day, and 1 Tbsp of fat for each egg consumed. The number of ouncesof cheese eatenshould not exceed the number of eggs eaten on each day. If you follow these simple guidelines, you get macronutrients nicely balanced outat the end of the day: Extremelylow carb, high fat, and moderate protein. Thats what the keto diet is all about, except that on Egg Fast, theres practically no fiber intake (no greens, seeds, meals, etc.). Because of this, in my personal opinion, thediet should be kept short-term. Additionally, I think magnesium , potassium , and vitamin supplements should be taken daily. And plenty of water drunk (10 cupsa day, at least).But I am no doctor, so take my advice as an opinion. So, why does the diet work? I think, most of all, one gets rid of plenty of water on Egg Fast. But peoplekeep reporting successful weight loss or weight maintenance for a prolongedperiod, following the fast.So, it is possible theres some hormonal stuff going on in the background, which influences bodys metabolism. Or the other way around. Anyhow, Ill be quite glad once I get to read some research on this (if ever). In case you havent been familiar with Egg Fast, Im listing the rules that one should supposedlyfollow on the diet if they want to break their stall: One has Continue reading >>

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