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Maintenance After Keto

Keto Diet Guide

Keto Diet Guide

Both my Apps and my first Cookbook include a complete guide to the Ketogenic Diet amongst many other features. Since I get frequently asked about it on my Facebook page, I have decided to share a brief overview of this guide with all of you! What is the Ketogenic Diet? Contrary to general dietary recommendations which have proven to be false, the ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet. It's a diet that causes ketones to be produced by the liver, shifting the body's metabolism away from glucose and towards fat utilization. The ketogenic diet is an effective weight loss tool and has been shown to improve several health conditions such Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy and even cancer. Healthy cells can use ketones for energy, but cancer cells cannot and they literally starve to death. If you want to learn more about the health benefits of the ketogenic diet, my good friend Franziska Spritzler, who also happens to be a qualified dietitian specialising on low-carb nutrition, has written a great article for my blog. How does it work? Very simply said, when you eat food high in carbs, your body produces glucose and insulin. While glucose is used as the main source of energy, insulin secretion is produced to down regulate your glucose levels in the blood stream. Insulin is also responsible for storing fat in our body and if your body produces too much of it, you put on weight. Excessive carbs, typical in modern diets, combined with lack of physical activity will likely result in weight gain. Based on a comparison of several scientific trials, low-carb diets outperform calorie-restricted diets in terms of long-term weight loss and health effects. A common misconception is that our body, especially our brain, needs glucose. Although glucose is known to be Continue reading >>

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). I personally recommend a cyclic ketogenic diet for most of my clients where you go low-carb for 3 days and then have a slightly higher carbohydrate day, followed by 3 lower carb days. This cycles the body in and out of a state of ketosis and is beneficial for hormone balance while keeping inflammatory levels very low. The biggest challenge with this nutrition plan is to get into and maintain the state of fat adaption. Here are several advanced tips to get into and maintain ketosis. 1. Stay Hydrated: This is considered a no-brainer, but is not easy to follow. We often get so busy in our day-day lives that we forget to hydrate effectively. I recommend super hydrating your system by drinking 32 oz of filtered water within the first hour of waking and another 32-48 oz of water before noon. I have most of my clients do a water fast or eat light in the morning doing smoothies or keto coffee or tea. So hydration around these dishes should be well tolerated by the digestive system. In general, aiming to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water and closer to your full body weight in ounces of water daily will help you immensely. I weigh 160 lbs and easily drink 140-180 ounces of water each day. Sometimes more in the summer time. As you begin super Continue reading >>

I Just Started Ketogenic Diet. I'm Losing Weight, But Once I Reach Target Weight, Is There A Way I Can Go Back Into A More Normal Diet That's Not Super High Carb Of Course, But Perhaps A Bowl Of Rice A Day Without Gaining The Weight Back?

I Just Started Ketogenic Diet. I'm Losing Weight, But Once I Reach Target Weight, Is There A Way I Can Go Back Into A More Normal Diet That's Not Super High Carb Of Course, But Perhaps A Bowl Of Rice A Day Without Gaining The Weight Back?

Sure. Paoli et al. did just that in a research study back in 2013. He had participants do 20 days of ketogenic dieting and then transitioned them to a low carb, high protein diet, and then finally had them on a Mediterranean diet – a moderate intake of fats, carbs, and protein for six months. They repeated this process. They found that during the bouts of keto, the participants lost body fat and maintained that loss throughout the transition to the Mediterranean diet. The key to transitioning successfully without gaining body fat – depending on how long you were in ketosis, insulin resistance can be a problem – is to take the transition slow. Meaning, don’t go from ~12 g carbs straight to 200g. Here’s what I’d recommend: One way to do this is is to slowly add 20-30 grams of carbs per week while holding your fat and protein intake where they are, until you’re out of a deficit and back to maintenance. As an example. Let’s assume you end the diet at 1700 calories. And you want to start bringing your calorie intake back up to your new maintenance of 2300 calories. This is how I would do it. If you’re end of diet macros were: 150g protein / 50g carbs/110g fat. Week 1:​ +20 grams carbs/ keep fats as they are / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 70g carbs / 110g fats (1870 calories) Week 2: ​+30 grams carbs/keep fats as they are/ protein stays the same – 150g protein / 100g carbs / 110g fats (1990 calories) Week 3: ​+30 grams carbs/ fat remains the same / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 130g carbs / 110g fats (2110 calories) Week 4: ​+30 grams carbs/ fat remains the same / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 160g carbs / 110g fats (2230 calories) At this point you can either keep things as they are, or start reducing fat intak Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

How To Come Off Of A Fat Loss Or Ketogenic Diet Correctly

How To Come Off Of A Fat Loss Or Ketogenic Diet Correctly

Diets by definition are temporary. This is what gets a lot of people in trouble because there is a defined time frame of when they monitor their caloric intake, and once that time period is up it’s easy to undo all the progress one made in just a few short weeks by returning to old eating habits. So while an individual reaches adequate levels of weight and fat loss during their diet, they can quickly gain back all the weight and fat they lost initially if not more. This leads to a false sense of morality tied into people’s nutrition and outrageous claims of people blaming their genetics for their body composition because “I’ve tried every diet and nothing works for me.” Well…I am here to tell you that you don’t have to fall into this viscous cycle as long as you know how to properly come off of either a fat loss or ketogenic diet. REVERSE DIETING. Boom – two key words is all it takes. Reverse dieting means there is a strategic and slow increase of either calories or specific macronutrients back into one’s every day nutrition versus an all-out binge returning to eating whatever anyone wants because “they earned it” – this will LIMIT (not eliminate) fat gain as you add calories back into the mix (because let’s face it – NO ONE wants to be in a caloric deficit year round!). So yes, calorie or macronutrient (i.e. protein, fat, carbs) counting must continue. Fail to take this phase of your diet into account and your scale numbers will skyrocket before you can think twice. So….hopefully you have followed a proper diet protocol meaning you didn’t start your diet at an absurdly low calorie count with high workload. Like your weight training, diets should be progressive – meaning the longer your diet goes you SLOWLY lower your food intake (keep Continue reading >>

5 Days Of Egg Fast | My Sweet Keto

5 Days Of Egg Fast | My Sweet Keto

A lot of people, especially those on LCHF and keto diets , do 5 Days ofEgg Fast to break their weightloss stall. Surprisingly, it works for a majorityof them if we are to believewhat they report on social networks and forums. I havent been able to find any real scientific explanation to why it works but have my thoughts (that might change in the future if I get more clues). Basically, on an Egg Fast, you only eat eggs , healthy fats, and full-fat cheese for 3 to 5 days in a row. You are supposed to eat at least 6 eggs a day, and 1 Tbsp of fat for each egg consumed. The number of ouncesof cheese eatenshould not exceed the number of eggs eaten on each day. If you follow these simple guidelines, you get macronutrients nicely balanced outat the end of the day: Extremelylow carb, high fat, and moderate protein. Thats what the keto diet is all about, except that on Egg Fast, theres practically no fiber intake (no greens, seeds, meals, etc.). Because of this, in my personal opinion, thediet should be kept short-term. Additionally, I think magnesium , potassium , and vitamin supplements should be taken daily. And plenty of water drunk (10 cupsa day, at least).But I am no doctor, so take my advice as an opinion. So, why does the diet work? I think, most of all, one gets rid of plenty of water on Egg Fast. But peoplekeep reporting successful weight loss or weight maintenance for a prolongedperiod, following the fast.So, it is possible theres some hormonal stuff going on in the background, which influences bodys metabolism. Or the other way around. Anyhow, Ill be quite glad once I get to read some research on this (if ever). In case you havent been familiar with Egg Fast, Im listing the rules that one should supposedlyfollow on the diet if they want to break their stall: One has Continue reading >>

Mythbusting: Training On A Keto Diet

Mythbusting: Training On A Keto Diet

There’s a number of myths, misconceptions, and misinformation floating around that are confusing a lot of people about the ketogenic diet. They’re teaching that when you’re training, whether for strength or for endurance, that carbohydrates are necessary in order to get the best results. This is not true, and I’ll tell you why. You Need Carbs To Build Muscle People that tell you this don’t understand how muscle building really works – it’s entirely possible to be gaining muscle mass while on keto. In a simple way, the 3 easy steps to build muscle are: Eating enough protein – For mass building between 1.0 – 1.2g / pound of LEAN body mass. Eating a calorie surplus – You can’t build muscle without eating more calories than you need, and these come from fats in a ketogenic diet. Training correctly – You need to promote hypertrophy in your muscles. Are carbs good for building muscle? Of course they are – they promote insulin release and help restore glycogen in the muscles. With carbs you gain mass quicker, but that’s because you’re also gaining fat. What exactly is glycogen? It’s a molecule that our bodies use as energy. What exactly does glycogen do? Wikipedia explains it nicely: In humans, glycogen is made and stored primarily in the cells of the liver and the muscles, and functions as the secondary long-term energy storage (with the primary energy stores being fats held in adipose tissue). Muscle cell glycogen appears to function as an immediate reserve source of available glucose for muscle cells. Other cells that contain small amounts use it locally as well. As you can see, glycogen is being used as a secondary source of energy, where fats are being used over it. Once your body has become adapted to using fats (you’re in ketosis), then Continue reading >>

The Atkins Diet

The Atkins Diet

The Atkins diet is by far the most famous ketogenic diet. The diet was developed by the late Robert C. Atkins, M.D. in the late 1980s. Unfortunately, and undeservedly, Dr. Atkin's diet has been a public target for the criticism about low carb diets, much of it from people who are ignorant in how the diet actually works. Some people opposed to low carb diets even go so far as to blame Dr. Atkin's death on it, when it reality, he died from a blow to the head, after slipping and falling on an icy sidewalk in Manhattan. Critics spout all kinds of false statements about the Atkins protocol. For instance, it's called a high protein diet, when in reality, it's a high fat, moderate protein, low carbohydrate way of eating. It's not all butter, bacon and cream. It's really just a clean, whole foods diet which includes green vegetables and fresh meat, fish and poultry. For weight loss, short of starving, there is no better method than a ketogenic diet, and for many people, the Atkins protocol is the diet that has worked for successful weight management. Basic Atkins Principles The basic premise of the diet is to lower your carbohydrate intake to a level that allows for weight loss, and then maintain eating that level of carb intake until you lose all the weight you want to lose. As time progresses, you then add more carbs to your diet until you reach a level that stabilizes your weight loss. Maintaining this level of carb intake each day allows you to stay at a lower weight for the rest of your life. It's important to remember that after losing weight on a ketogenic diet, you can't simply go back to your old high carb eating habits and expect to stay at your new weight. The point of finding your maintenance carb level is to know your point of "carbohydrate tolerance". In other wor Continue reading >>

Going Keto Part 7: How To Cycle Out Of Keto

Going Keto Part 7: How To Cycle Out Of Keto

Sponsored Content From buying all of the necessary supplies to becoming fully keto-adapted, you've done it all. Keto's been a fun ride and has given you a completely new perspective on the wide world of nutrition for optimal sports performance and health. But let's face it: there are weddings, reunions, and all sorts of social activities that can sometimes make it difficult to stay on a truly ketogenic diet at all times. Sometimes, life simply gets in the way. In this article, we'll outline tips to help you temporarily break ketosis without repercussions, explain the changes in your metabolism that might arise, and show how to slowly transition out of a fat loss phase into a lean mass gaining phase while still staying keto-adapted. Breaking ketosis does not necessarily mean that you are doomed to be out of ketosis indefinitely. In fact, for those of you who have been keto-adapted for an extended period of time, you will find that the longer you have been in ketosis, the easier it will be for you to get back into it after temporarily breaking it. There are some subtle tricks in order for you to break ketosis for a day or two and quickly get back into a fat burning state. Key #1: Break Keto on the Weekends While you can technically break ketosis at any point that you want to, most will find it best to do so on the weekend. Why? Weekends are when the vast majority of social gatherings take place. Weekdays usually mean regimented routines centered around a work day. That makes it easier to stick to a ketogenic diet because you’re in a groove and dialed into your routine. On the weekends, schedules tend to be more open. That makes those glorious two days the perfect time to let loose. So go ahead and enjoy some carbs with your friends and family! Key #2: Keep Your High Car Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

Maintenance On A Ketogenic Diet: Voluntary Exercise, Adiposity, And Neuroendocrine Effects

Maintenance On A Ketogenic Diet: Voluntary Exercise, Adiposity, And Neuroendocrine Effects

Go to: Abstract Adherence to low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets has been associated with greater weight loss in the short-term than low-fat, calorie-restricted diets. However, consumption of ketogenic diets may result in decreased voluntary exercise and thus render long-term weight loss and maintenance of weight loss difficult. Rats were maintained on either a non-ketogenic chow (CH) diet or a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (KD) for 6 weeks. Half of each dietary group was sedentary, while the other half was given access to a running wheel. Running wheel activity (total distance and meters/minute), plasma leptin and insulin, adiposity, and hypothalamic mRNA for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) were measured to assess activity-related effects in animals maintained on KD. With access to a running wheel, rats on KD engaged in similar levels of voluntary activity as CH rats and both dietary groups decreased caloric intake. Caloric intake increased over time such that it was significantly greater than sedentary controls after one month of access to the wheels, however body weight remained decreased. Sedentary rats maintained on KD had increased adiposity and plasma leptin levels and decreased hypothalamic POMC mRNA, as compared to sedentary CH rats. KD rats with access to a running wheel had similar levels of adiposity and plasma leptin levels as CH rats with access to running wheels, but significantly increased POMC mRNA in the arcuate. We demonstrate that maintenance on KD does not inhibit voluntary activity in a running wheel. Furthermore, prevention of KD-related increased adiposity and plasma leptin, as measured in sedentary KD rats, significantly increases levels of the anorexigenic neuropeptide POMC mRNA. Keywords: proopiomelanocortin, leptin, low-c Continue reading >>

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

I had a question for anyone who had gone VLC or Keto and then decided to add fruit or sweet potato back in. I bloat when I eat carbs (possible intolerance?) and am wondering if this could be a simple adaptation period or if you can actually create carb intolerance by going VLC for a longer period of time? I am a semi professional athlete training twice per day, and am thinking of adding more carbs to help with recovery (I am very sore and it is starting to affect sleep). 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Thoughts and experiences? Continue reading >>

Ketosis Done Right–meet Anne

Ketosis Done Right–meet Anne

Today we have an inspiring real world “n=1” example of how a ketogenic diet can be successfully used by a real woman to easily and happily lose weight! I thought it would be nice to give you all a much-deserved break from my own dietary misadventures and stop to appreciate the beauty of a well-done ketogenic diet. My recent experiment with Professor Seyfried’s dietary recommendations for cancer was one of extreme ketosis for the explicit purpose of cancer treatment. However, most people who decide to try a ketogenic diet do so with the goal of losing weight, and they use a more moderate plan, such as the one recommended by Dr.s Phinney and Volek, in their book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, or the one recommended by Dr. Ron Rosedale in his book The Rosedale Diet. It is this kind of plan I intend to try myself soon, motivated in no small part by my friend Anne, who has successfully applied ketogenic dietary theory to her own life, and who has generously agreed to share her inspirational story here with us. But first, a bit of context. On a beautiful autumn day last October, I was sitting on a beach in picturesque Rockport, Massachusetts with two friends, babbling incessantly about some of the talks I had heard at the 2012 Ancestral Health Symposium, and all the latest things I had been l learning about diet and health, as I am wont to do. Most of my friends and coworkers have learned to deal with this annoying tendency by employing one of two common strategies: Nodding politely and feigning interest, while secretly thinking about far less important things, such as global warming, conflict in the Middle East, and the plight of the piping plover. Disagreeing with my unorthodox dietary philosophies by posing traditional counterarguments, such as “mi Continue reading >>

The Diet After The Diet

The Diet After The Diet

You’re here. The promised land. The end of the diet. You’re lean. Abs popping, biceps bulging, chest striating. You’ve finally achieved the badass physique you set out to achieve. But, now what? You see, while everyone focusses on the weight loss, getting lean, shredded – whatever – part of the diet, nobody focusses on the most important aspect of ‘dieting’ – What to do when the diet ends? The diet AFTER the diet. You want to transition back to normality and be able to eat more food, have your vigor back and begin making some gains, but you also don’t want to lose the physique you’ve attained. You’ve seen it happen all too often, your bro who dieted down, and then a week later has undone the hard work as he pigs out on buffets, Ben and Jerry’s and a multitude of other delicacies that would give michael phelps a run for his money. You dont want this fate, you decide. Which leads to the question : How do I transition back to normality and maintain this physique ? Good question. And that’s exactly what I’m going to be covering in this post. So take a seat, grab a protein shake and lets begin. What Exactly Is Maintenance? Maintenance, as it pertains to physique composition, is simply the act of keeping your physique at a certain level of conditioning. It is achieved by eating enough calories to keep you out of a deficit, and not enough to be gaining weight. It’s the point of equilibrium. However, maintenance is a very nebulous term. There’s a whole host of calculators and equations out there on the internet that make claims of working out your ‘maintenance caloric intake’, as if the human body were that predictable. ‘Maintenance’ is a fluctuating number and can vary from day to day ; Say one day you spend the afternoon tidying the hou Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

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