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Maintenance After Keto

Ketopia Guide

Ketopia Guide

Ketopia is a one-of-a-kind program designed to put you in nutritional ketosis in as little as one hour, and help you stay on the path toward optimal health and wellness for long after. The Bridge to Ketopia includes the tools you need to achieve nutritional ketosis and reinvigorate your body in just one week. Drink 1 KetonX with 1 enzyme every morning. Three to four hours later, enjoy 1 enzyme and a Dough Bite either straight out of the package or warmed up for a sweet treat. Three to four hours after that, mix contents of one KetoCream or Fixx pouch into 8-12 ounces of water and drink with 1 enzyme. Pair a keto-friendly meal with 1 enzyme every evening. WHAT DOES KETO-FRIENDLY MEAN? The best way to support your Ketopia journey is with a diet that consists primarily of fat, with moderate protein and low carbohydrate intake. For best results, aim for a ratio of 70% fat, 25% protein, and 5% carbohydrates. DOWNLOAD RECIPE GUIDE Before you begin, you are encouraged to take a “before” photo and an inventory of your body measurements, energy level, mental clarity, and overall sense of wellbeing so you can track your results. It’s also wise to get plenty of rest and consult your healthcare professional before starting any health program. DOWNLOAD BEFORE AND AFTER CHECKLIST Once you’ve crossed the bridge, staying in ketosis is as simple as maintaining a keto-friendly diet, plenty of exercise, and enjoying all the KetoCafé has to offer. As a foundation, we recommend enjoying a KetoCream Shake each day and taking two Enzymes with your evening meal. Of course, the KetoCafé includes a number of delicious keto-friendly options that allow you to customize a maintenance plan that works best for you! Don’t worry! It’s OK to spring for dessert or splurge at the buffet at y Continue reading >>

6 Easy Steps For Reintroducing Carbs Without Gaining Weight

6 Easy Steps For Reintroducing Carbs Without Gaining Weight

Have you tried a ketogenic diet and discovered it's not the right diet for you? Me too! Maybe, you've arrived at the Atkins pre-maintenance phase, Phase 3, and are now feeling a bit timid about returning carbs to your diet. This article will help you, too. Either way, reintroducing carbs doesn't mean you have to settle for weight regain. While you do have to be mindful, here's the 6 easy steps I used to reintroduce carbs after leaving ketosis. A traditional low-carb diet is very restrictive. Most plans require you to lower your carbohydrates to less than 50 net carbs per day. Some people enjoy eating mostly protein foods and vegetables, and some do not because along with lowering those carbohydrates, most low-carb plans don't let you eat potatoes, rice, bread, or other starchy foods -- even at higher carb levels. Many people begin missing those higher carb foods, especially if you've never adapted to burning fat for fuel or the weight isn't coming off as easily as you thought it would. While you can always adapt your low-carb meal plan to fit your preferences, most people don't know how to do that. If you used low carb as a temporary, lose-weight-quick solution, you might have discovered that body fat doesn't go away any faster than it does on other diet plans. This can be quite frustrating! The frustration increases even more if you don't have the genetics to easily burn fats for fuel, or you have health conditions that interfere with fat burning. If so, you just won't feel well eating at very low carb levels. No matter what your reasons are for leaving ketosis behind, you have probably found carbohydrate restriction to not be sustainable long term. While some people feel better eating at very low-carb levels, others do not. Regardless of what most low carbers believe, Continue reading >>

How To Do A Keto Diet After Bariatric Surgery.

How To Do A Keto Diet After Bariatric Surgery.

As you transition to maintenance post-surgery, a Keto diet can help you maintain your healthy weight loss. BariatricEating.com has some important tips on ‘the best of Keto”: Not all parts of the Keto plan are smart for people who have had aggressive stomach altering obesity surgery. There are two versions of Keto and you have to make sure you don’t fall for the FATBRAIN version – that’s the one with the cream cheese, cheddar cheese and bacon with butter poured over everything. Lucky for you that we are both nutrition and bariatric experts to boot – we’ll help you take the Best of Keto that will move you towards life goals and leave the rest behind. Click here to read more. Continue reading >>

The Diet After The Diet

The Diet After The Diet

You’re here. The promised land. The end of the diet. You’re lean. Abs popping, biceps bulging, chest striating. You’ve finally achieved the badass physique you set out to achieve. But, now what? You see, while everyone focusses on the weight loss, getting lean, shredded – whatever – part of the diet, nobody focusses on the most important aspect of ‘dieting’ – What to do when the diet ends? The diet AFTER the diet. You want to transition back to normality and be able to eat more food, have your vigor back and begin making some gains, but you also don’t want to lose the physique you’ve attained. You’ve seen it happen all too often, your bro who dieted down, and then a week later has undone the hard work as he pigs out on buffets, Ben and Jerry’s and a multitude of other delicacies that would give michael phelps a run for his money. You dont want this fate, you decide. Which leads to the question : How do I transition back to normality and maintain this physique ? Good question. And that’s exactly what I’m going to be covering in this post. So take a seat, grab a protein shake and lets begin. What Exactly Is Maintenance? Maintenance, as it pertains to physique composition, is simply the act of keeping your physique at a certain level of conditioning. It is achieved by eating enough calories to keep you out of a deficit, and not enough to be gaining weight. It’s the point of equilibrium. However, maintenance is a very nebulous term. There’s a whole host of calculators and equations out there on the internet that make claims of working out your ‘maintenance caloric intake’, as if the human body were that predictable. ‘Maintenance’ is a fluctuating number and can vary from day to day ; Say one day you spend the afternoon tidying the hou Continue reading >>

How A Low-carb, High-fat Lifestyle Can Help End Yo-yo Dieting

How A Low-carb, High-fat Lifestyle Can Help End Yo-yo Dieting

Anyone who has tried at least one diet plan is probably familiar with the yo-yo effect – a term commonly used to describe those exasperating cycles of weight loss and regain. At the start of a new diet or different exercise program, individuals often see great results. However, improvements typically wane after a few weeks, resulting in the dreaded plateau and numbers on a scale that creep back up to, or even above, their original weight. Furthermore, recent research suggests this pattern isn’t just frustrating, but also a serious potential health threat. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that “fluctuation in body weight was associated with higher mortality and a higher rate of cardiovascular events independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors.”1 So why do we get stuck in this rut of ups and downs? Our bodies’ own survival mechanisms are to blame. We tend to think of our metabolism as a simple bank account of calories. When we lose substantial amounts of weight, our metabolic rate starts to slow down,2,3 meaning we don’t burn as many calories throughout the day. Fat loss also tends to increase circulating levels of appetite hormones,4 making hunger and cravings even worse. A high-fat, low-carb diet shows promise as a sustainable means of weight-maintenance by addressing these two critical factors: (1) Maintaining metabolic rate and (2) Attenuating drastic fluctuations in appetite hormones. Cutting the string on the yo-yo effect Researchers wanted to examine the effects of dietary composition on energy expenditure during weight-loss maintenance by comparing 3 different diets differing in macronutrient composition and glycemic load. The study involved 21 overweight adults who were followed between 2006 and 2010. After achieving Continue reading >>

Getting Off Your Low-carb Diet Without Gaining Weight

Getting Off Your Low-carb Diet Without Gaining Weight

As predicted, many people are growing tired of #low-carb diets because, like all diets, they have a low long-term success rate, offer little variety and — well, I guess people miss carbs. But the truth is that you can continue to lose weight, or maintain the weight you lost on your low-carb #diet, if you follow a few simple rules. PATIENCE You’re not going to lose weight as quickly when you go off your low-carb diet, and, in fact, you might actually gain a few pounds at first. “Don’t freak out. When you start #eating healthy carbs, you may gain some water weight, because some of the weight you originally lost was water, especially in the intro stages,” says Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., senior clinical nutritionist at New York University Medical Center in New York City. How long do you have to give yourself to adjust? “Give it about three to four weeks,” suggests Dawn Jackson, R.D., L.D., of Northwestern Memorial Wellness Institute and a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. DON’T GO WHITE One of the biggest mistakes low-carb dieters make is going back to the white stuff. It’s very easy to overindulge in empty-calorie foods, such as cookies, cakes, white bread, potatoes and pasta. “And white carbs are also convenient — too convenient! — available at every turn: in the vending machine, the open box in the pantry, as side orders in restaurants,” explains nutritionist Molly Kimball, M.S., R.D., of the Ochsner Clinic Foundation in New Orleans. Instead, make sure your starchy carbs come from whole grains. “When you reintroduce carbs, the whole grains give you a more consistent release of energy, whereas eating foods with refined white flour or sugar may make you hungry sooner,” says Heller. Whole grains have a high fiber content, whi Continue reading >>

Maintaining Healthy State Of Ketosis.

Maintaining Healthy State Of Ketosis.

Key takeaways from eating a diet of 70% fat for 30 days. My aim is to encourage you to experiment with your own diet and discover healthier eating habits. When is just as important as what. I got fat eating healthy food. I always assumed eating quality, unprocessed, whole foods makes for a healthy eating lifestyle. But as I ate my way from country-to-country in Southeast Asia, I began to notice pound-after-pound being added to my belly. Kind of strange seeing as I’m price-insensitive to food, cook most my meals and workout often. Sup with that!? Ben might know… As fate would have it, he was in the process of experimenting with the Ketogenic Diet. As he explained to me what he learned, I envied his embodied understanding of how each macronutrient delivers a different form of energy to the body. Say no more … I’m an energy freak, in all aspects. Energy is, and creates, life. So I committed 30 days to the Keto Diet to learn what was somehow skip over in all my health classes: how foods are converted into energy and effects our body. Ketosis in a Nutshell When our body converts food into energy the go-to source is carbohydrates, which break down to glucose. However, our body has evolved to only store a finite amount of glucose (give or take 1600 calories). So after our body is depleted of carbohydrates it needs another source of fuel. So it resorts to fat, which break down into ketone bodies. Ketosis then is a metabolic state in which our body derives energy from fat. And glycolysis is when our body is deriving energy from carbs. So if you eliminate carbohydrates from your diet, your body will enjoy burning both consumed and stored fat for energy. Muscle is spared and fat is burned, that’s ketosis! Our ancestors were big fans of ketosis. In fact, their survival de Continue reading >>

Three Phases To Keto Mastery

Three Phases To Keto Mastery

Starting the ketogenic lifestyle can be a difficult choice. Let’s be honest, it’s a different way of living, and it’s not for everyone. But it can be incredibly rewarding. I’ve broken down what I think are the three phases to the keto journey. The Introduction Phase This phase has two parts, really. The first part is where you get mentally prepared to deal with the changes you are about to make. You have to get your mind set right and focused on the goal you have put in place. But after that (or at the same time), you have to start getting a handle on the right kinds of foods to eat. In this phase, you will be ejecting all the bad stuff from your pantry. Toss the sugar, bread, pasta, sweets, fruits (berries are okay…but not Crunch Berries or Frankenberries), sodas (yes, diet soda, too), alcohol, potatoes, etc. Get rid of all the bad foods that have gotten you to this point. Also, you need to start getting used to eating copious amounts of fat and eating cleaner carbs (veggies). You’re going to change the kinds of meat you eat from the lean stuff to the fatty stuff (or, as I like to call it…the delicious stuff). You’re going to realize that dessert doesn’t signal the end of a meal, being full does. This phase requires a lot of discipline so that you can start to develop good habits. This is the rigid, structured, unbending phase. It is a necessary phase and it will take anywhere from 21 days to 12 months. Adjustment Phase This phase is when you finally get your Introduction Phase goods figured out, dialed in, and settled. You have, by this point, figured out what keto foods you like and you’ve gotten good at sticking to them. When you get to this point, you have developed traits and habits that you can rely upon. THIS IS IMPORTANT: If you haven’t go Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Guide

Keto Diet Guide

Both my Apps and my first Cookbook include a complete guide to the Ketogenic Diet amongst many other features. Since I get frequently asked about it on my Facebook page, I have decided to share a brief overview of this guide with all of you! What is the Ketogenic Diet? Contrary to general dietary recommendations which have proven to be false, the ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet. It's a diet that causes ketones to be produced by the liver, shifting the body's metabolism away from glucose and towards fat utilization. The ketogenic diet is an effective weight loss tool and has been shown to improve several health conditions such Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy and even cancer. Healthy cells can use ketones for energy, but cancer cells cannot and they literally starve to death. If you want to learn more about the health benefits of the ketogenic diet, my good friend Franziska Spritzler, who also happens to be a qualified dietitian specialising on low-carb nutrition, has written a great article for my blog. How does it work? Very simply said, when you eat food high in carbs, your body produces glucose and insulin. While glucose is used as the main source of energy, insulin secretion is produced to down regulate your glucose levels in the blood stream. Insulin is also responsible for storing fat in our body and if your body produces too much of it, you put on weight. Excessive carbs, typical in modern diets, combined with lack of physical activity will likely result in weight gain. Based on a comparison of several scientific trials, low-carb diets outperform calorie-restricted diets in terms of long-term weight loss and health effects. A common misconception is that our body, especially our brain, needs glucose. Although glucose is known to be Continue reading >>

Carb Cycling Diet Plan Benefits & Tips To Maintain Healthy Weight

Carb Cycling Diet Plan Benefits & Tips To Maintain Healthy Weight

The carb cycling diet has been popular among bodybuilders, fitness models and certain types of athletes for decades. Carb cycling — eating more carbs only on certain days — is believed to be beneficial as one of the best diet plans to lose weight and gain muscle because it stimulates certain digestive and metabolic functions. What makes carbs so special? Carbohydrates are the body’s first source of fuel, since they’re easily turned into glucose and glycogen, which feed your cells and help create ATP (energy). Your metabolism rises and falls based on your consumption of calories and different macronutrients, including carbohydrates. (1) And many studies have found that adequate carb intake improves performance in both prolonged, low-intensity and short, high-intensity exercises. (2) Perhaps you’ve heard that your metabolism is a lot like a fire: If you fuel “the fire” with the right ingredients, it keeps burning hotter. As Chris Powell, one of the leading authorities on carb cycling, puts it, “If you don’t throw enough fuel on the fire, the flame fizzles out.” Eating enough carbohydrates at the right time resets your metabolic thermostat and signals your body to create enough beneficial hormones (like leptin and thyroid hormones) that keep you at a healthy weight. However, as we all know, too many carbs can have the opposite effect and cause weight gain. What’s key about a carb cycling diet that makes it different from other plans? Carb cycling increases carbohydrate (and sometimes calorie) intake only at the right time and in the right amounts. While other long-term diet plans might seem overly restrictive, daunting and overwhelming, many find that a carb cycling diet is easy to follow and even fits into a hectic schedule. What Is Carb Cycling? Car Continue reading >>

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

After Ketosis...going Back On The Carbs

I had a question for anyone who had gone VLC or Keto and then decided to add fruit or sweet potato back in. I bloat when I eat carbs (possible intolerance?) and am wondering if this could be a simple adaptation period or if you can actually create carb intolerance by going VLC for a longer period of time? I am a semi professional athlete training twice per day, and am thinking of adding more carbs to help with recovery (I am very sore and it is starting to affect sleep). 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Thoughts and experiences? Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

January Water Fast: What I Ate After Fasting And How Much Did I Gain?

January Water Fast: What I Ate After Fasting And How Much Did I Gain?

It’s been just about 50 hours since I ended my 12 day January Water Fast. (my fast ended on Saturday morning, right now it’s Monday morning) I’ve actually learned so much about my body and my eating habits in such a short period of time that it’s astonishing. First of all – I sincerely love food and even more so love to cook. My kitchen is my happy place and I’m totes happy to be cooking/eating again. However, Eating 3 meals on Saturday was just way too much food. When you complete a water fast the most important aspect to ensure you don’t regain the weight you lost, is to not return to the same eating style you had before your fast (if you weren’t eating healthily) Ray & I are eating low-carb/high-fat in order to maintain our ketogenic state (i.e. fat burning machine. While many people say that you need to end a water fast with soft foods, we took a less traveled path of eating real food. And it was a huge success. Between Ray & I we were on both ends of the spectrum when it comes to digestion — for some it moves a little fast and some it moves a little slow (at the request of my hubby I won’t get into specifics but I’m sure you get my drift) We didn’t feel sick or nauseated – only overfull since undoubtedly our stomaches shrunk in 12 day w/o eating – so any quantity of food would make us feel extra full. And we consciously realized that going forward we need to adjust the way we fill our plates, eating less quantity overall. A secret to keep your portions under control is to use smaller plates – the plates in all of these pictures aren’t full size they are large salad plates. Saturday – 25 g net carbs 9 am Breakfast: 2 Scrambled Eggs, Canadian Bacon, Asparagus, Raw Butter & Sauerkraut – 3g net carbs 1 pm Lunch: cottage cheese, olive Continue reading >>

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