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Low Carb Physiological Insulin Resistance

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Which is the best weight loss diet? Ketogenic diet vs low carb diet vs atkins vs paleo? Which one of these meal plans is best to burn fat? FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d... Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O70G4m Isn't the ketogenic diet and low carb diet essentially the same thing? How about Atkins and paleo aren't all of these diets just a fancy way of saying keep your carbs low. Well it's definitely safe to say that you are limiting your carb intake in all of these diet plans but each plan calls for a slightly different approach to burning fat. Most ketogenic diets require you to keep your carbs under 30 grams a day and the most carbs that I've ever seen on a keto plan was 50 grams a day. Usually this will account for 5% of your total daily intake. Then you would have somewhere between 75 to 80 percent of your calories from fat. And finally 15 to 20 percent of your calories from protein. With ketogenic it's clear that the carbs are very limited at only 5 percent per day and the reason why carbs are so limited is because the ketogenic diet is trying to put you into ketosis. To sum it up simply ketosis is a state in which you're going to burn more fat and produce Ketone bodies in your liver for use as energy when carbohydrates are really low. Low-carb diets on the other hand don't require an exact number of carbohydrates the way that keto does. Obviously since it's low carb you wouldnt expect to have more than 20 to 30 percent of your calories coming from carbs but even at 20 percent it's a huge difference from the five percent that you get with keto. So with low carb we can consider the exact number of carbs undefined whereas with Keto that number is very defined with exact numerical values. What about atkins? When taking a closer look at Atkins you see that Atkins is different from keto and low-carb as well. With Atkins the General accepted split is 30% protein 10% carbs and 60% fat. Again this is higher in carbs than the 5 percent we see with keto which Keto dieters would not support because they would say that having a higher level of carbs would take you out of ketosis. But Atkins at certain points dies definitely put you into ketosis. The plan takes you through four phases and a lot of these phases match up with the keto structure. In Phase 1 of Atkins you have to limit your totally daily carb intake to only 20 grams per day. This is as low if not even lower than keto. Then you progress to phase 2 where you still keep carbs really low but you add in certain vegetables berries nuts and seeds back into the diet. Then in Phase 3 which you only start once you're about 10 pounds from your weight loss goal, but once your there you start to add 10 grams of carbs to your diet each week. And finally in phase four you enter maintenance which allows you to eat anywhere from 45 to 100 grams of carbs per day. Phase one and two sound just like the ketogenic diet and I'm sure when your in those two phases you will be in a state of ketosis but when you enter into phase 3 and phase 4 you're going to be moving more towards a general low carb diet which as ive already mentioned is very different from keto. Now how about paleo, where does paleo fit in all of this. Well paleo once again elicits fat loss by keeping the list of approved carbs short but the paleo plan is different because it only allows Foods that were believed to be eaten by our caveman ancestors. The best paleo macronutrient split as defined by the perfect health diet and paleo leap.com is around 20 percent carbohydrates 65 percent fat and 15 percent protein. Again this is slightly different from what we've seen with low carb and Atkins but it's very different from keto. Even though paleo and Keto are both low in carbohydrates Keto is significantly lower than paleo again keto totals only at 5% of total daily intake. The Paleo diet is also very specific with what foods you can and cannot eat. Even though you can do this diet with regular produce it's highly recommended that all your meat products are grass-fed wild caught and pasture-raised. You're allowed to eat any fresh vegetables except for potatoes and any nuts except for peanuts. Also eggs, healthy oils like olive oil, and fresh fruit especially berries are allowed on the plan. Grains, bread, cereals, any processed food, legumes, beans, and Dairy are completely off the plan. Dairy is a big part of the ketogenic diet for many people. A lot of people get the massive amount of fat required on keto with options like cheese. Cheese would be forbidden on the Paleo diet but on paleo you would actually be able to eat things like pumpkin squash and yams. With keto it would be almost impossible to eat these things because you would easily exceed you're 5% carb allowance. Most of these diets matchup in their efforts to limit grains

Physiological Insulin Resistance = Low Carbohydrate Diet Induced Insulin Resistance

I’ll admit to breathing a sigh of relief back in October of 2007, when Peter at Hyperlipid posted about “Physiological insulin resistance.” Curiously, looking at the post again, I note that he didn’t capitalize the second two words—as though it’s not a proper name for a specific condition. Back in mid summer 2007 there was this thread on the Bernstein forum. Mark, posting as iwilsmar, asked about his gradual yet progressively rising fasting blood glucose (FBG) level over a 10 year period of paleolithic LC eating. Always eating less than 30g carbohydrate per day. Initially on LC his blood glucose was 83mg/dl but it has crept up, year by year, until now his FBG is up to 115mg/dl. Post prandial values are normal. He wanted to know if he was developing diabetes. […] What is happening? Well, the first thing is that LC eating rapidly induces insulin resistance. This is a completely and utterly normal physiological response to carbohydrate restriction. Carbohydrate restriction drops insulin levels. Low insulin levels activate hormone sensitive lipase. Fatty tissue breaks down and releases non esterified fatty acids. These are mostly taken up by muscle cells as fuel and autom Continue reading >>

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  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Grasses are good for you for all the reasons, because some of the stongest, muscled animals in the world like elephants, gorillas, bears, horses, cows are all grass eaters. Grasses help balance sugar levels.The listed grasses are edible and can be consumed in juice form.The grasses are also available in powder form. Disclaimer: The information provided by Diet Table channel are for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. Before starting a new diet always seek the advice of your physician. If you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provider. Diet Table - TIPS IN A MINUTE One which gives Natural Health Benefits, Beauty and Fitness secret !! Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgjV... -A Like us on Facebook :https://www.facebook.com/dietintable/ Follow us on Twitter:https://twitter.com/TableDiet

Keto Talk (episode 16): Physiologic Insulin Resistance, Grain-fed Vs. Grass-fed, & How To Deal With Keto Naysayers

LCC (Episode 181): Cassy Joy Garcia And Dr. Christa Whiteman On Nina Teicholz Panel Controversy The LLVLC Show (Episode 1092): Dr. Ron Rosedale Joint Talk With Jimmy Moore In Boulder, Colorado Keto Talk (Episode 16): Physiologic Insulin Resistance, Grain-Fed vs. Grass-Fed, & How To Deal With Keto Naysayers KETOGENIC GIRL MINUTE WITH VANESSA COLLETTE If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from Livin La Vida Low-Carb and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from Doc Muscles who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questionssend an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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What is INSULIN RESISTANCE? What does INSULIN RESISTANCE mean? INSULIN RESISTANCE meaning - INSULIN RESISTANCE definition - INSULIN RESISTANCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults. Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose. Insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin action; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance may also develop in patients who have recently experienced abdominal or bariatric procedures. This acute form of insulin resistance that may result post-operatively tends to increase over the short-term with sensitivity to insulin typically returning to patients after about five days.

Physiological Insulin Resistance

I’ve been meaning to do a deep dive into physiological insulin resistance for quite a while now, but the universe keeps conspiring to take my time. Because I haven’t had time to read, learn more and write about it, I thought I’d share the links I have accumulated thus far. Mostly because I’ve now been asked a variant of the following multiple times, or have seen the following posted on various forums for discussing nutrition, health, and low carbohydrate diets: “Why has my blood glucose gone up on a low carb diet?” Typically this is accompanied by a good deal of anxiety and fretting over glucometers. I should know, I watched my blood glucose increase by a few points as I’ve sustained my low carb diet. My understanding is that this is a known adaptation completely unrelated to the insulin resistance concomitant with diabetes. While I’m not the person you should ask about anything health related, I’ve wanted an answer to this question myself. The explanation I’ve read is that after going low carb, your muscle tissue becomes insulin resistant in order to preserve serum glucose availability for the brain. If your muscle tissue did not do this, reduced availability o Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. BobbyS

    Can insulin resistance truly be reversed?

    I'm a bit unclear on what "insulin resistance reversal" or "diabetes reversal" really means.
    I was diagnosed as prediabetic about 3 weeks ago. I got a blood meter and my first test was postprandial and showed 191.
    I have been water fasting and eating LCHF since then...except for 3 days which is where I get the following info:
    It appears that "real food carbs" (e.g. carrots, onions, etc.) have virtually no effect on me. A meal with ~ 80 grams of real food carbs moved my blood glucose from 83 to 89.
    It also appears that eating LCHF keeps my blood glucose well < 100 but a single sugar/starch/refined flour meal will spike my blood sugar anywhere from 150 to 160 (I've eaten 2 such meals is where I get this data) and it takes a couple of days for my blood sugar to drop back below 100 (at least at my "dawn phenomenon" readings).
    Is "insulin resistance reversal" truly possible or can insulin resistance only be managed as long as sugar/starch/refined is avoided like the plague?
    I know I can't go back to eating like I used to eat...but it would be nice to hope that one day I will be able to "splurge occasionally" and keep normal blood sugar numbers...

  2. qsefthuko

    You might. Some people can some people can't.

  3. qsefthuko

    Apparently LCHF causes a degree of insulin resistance or something. If you have been eating LCHF for a bit and then eat a carby meal it can and probably will raise you higher than you might expect.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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