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Low Carb Diet And Blood Sugar

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs Can you have high blood sugar without carbs? Well, its important to look at common beliefs about high blood sugar first. High blood sugar is bad. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Therefore carbohydrates are bad. The theory is simple, and yet incredibly flawed. The truth is, you can have chronically high blood sugar even while religiously avoiding every starch and sugar in sight. Low-carb forums are littered with posts asking a very relevant question: Why is my blood sugar so high when Im not eating any carbs? The answer is simple, yet often overlooked. The Hormone that Raises Blood Sugar: No Carbohydrates Required If the body were an engine, glucose would be its fuel. Most people think glucose only comes from carbohydrates (sugar and starch), but protein can also be turned into glucose when there arent enough carbs around to do the job. This is called gluconeogenesis, and its performed by one of the major stress hormones cortisol. When you have high cortisol levels (from diet, lifestyle, etc.), the cortisol rapidly breaks down protein into glucose, which can raise blood sugar levels considerably. For some folks, this results in chronically high blood sugareven if they are on a low-carb diet. The trouble is, cortisol isnt just breaking down the protein you eat. Its doing something far more destructive. The body is quite a smart machine, and it has no problem taking detours to get energy if necessary. If your body isnt getting the energy it needs from your diet, it has a back-up source: its own tissue. It sounds kind of cannibalistic, eating your own lean body tissue for energy. I mean, I seriously doubt any one of you would relish cutting off a chunk of your leg for dinner. I know I wouldnt. But every time your body uses c Continue reading >>

Dr. Bernstein’s Low-carb Diabetes Diet

Dr. Bernstein’s Low-carb Diabetes Diet

Dr. Richard K. Bernstein is a legend in the diabetes community. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over seven decades ago, created the movement to check blood sugars at home, developed a diabetes management program built on the philosophy that “everyone deserves normal blood sugars” – and then became an endocrinologist so others would take him seriously. In this article, we will look at Dr. Bernstein’s diabetes diet. In essence, it is a low-carb, high-protein and moderate fat diet. He recommends this approach because it maximizes the chances for achieving normalized blood sugars. If you are interested in a less restrictive, more general-purpose low-carb diet, read How to Start a Low-Carb Diabetes Diet. Before we go into the diet itself, let’s look at Dr. Bernstein’s fascinating story. Dr. Bernstein was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 12 in 1946. Dr. Bernstein was diagnosed with diabetes during what is commonly referred to as the diabetes “dark ages”. He had to check his urine for sugar by using a test tube heated over a flame. He had to sterilize his needles and glass syringes by boiling them each day. In Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution, he explains how his blood sugars were not well managed during this time. In fact, back then fat was deemed the ultimate health culprit and so he was put on a low-fat and high-carbohydrate diet. During the first two decades of his life with diabetes, he says his growth was stunted and nearly all his organs quickly began to suffer the consequences of chronic high blood sugar. Heartbreakingly, he suffered many serious complications of diabetes as a young man. Luckily, blood glucose meters were just becoming available. Wikipedia explains: In October 1969, Bernstein came across an advertisement in the trad Continue reading >>

Why Low-carb Diets Aren’t The Answer

Why Low-carb Diets Aren’t The Answer

What raises blood sugar? The simple answer is carbohydrates. So why not just yank them out of your diet like weeds in your garden? Why not quash blood sugar by swearing off bread, pasta, rice, and cereal? Been there, done that. The low-carb craze is on the downswing, and that’s a good thing because over the long haul, very low carb diets simply aren’t good for you, as you’ll discover in this chapter. That doesn’t mean it’s not smart to cut back on carbs—but don’t go crazy. When low-carb diets first became popular, they seemed to be a breath of fresh air after the low-fat (and high-carb) diets that preceded them. Remember low-fat cookies, lowfat snack cakes, and low-fat everything else? With low-carb diets, suddenly people could load up on bacon and still lose weight as long as they were willing to eat hamburgers without buns and pretty much give up sandwiches and spaghetti. People were amazed at how effective these diets could be. Weight loss could happen very quickly, sometimes within days. And amazingly, it often seemed to come with added health benefits, including lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and triglycerides (blood fats linked to heart attacks.) The most extreme kind of low-carb diet was pioneered by the late Robert Atkins, M.D., whose first book, Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution, came out in 1972. It promised quick and long-lasting weight loss and prevention of chronic disease, all while allowing high-fat steak and ice cream. Since then, other, more moderate low-carb diets have allowed small amounts of carbohydrate-rich foods, but they still cut out most grains as well as starchy vegetables and even fruit. The Downsides of These Diets The Atkins diet and the many other low-carb diets that followed in its footsteps have turned out to be less effect Continue reading >>

Using Low Carb Diet And Sugar Is Still High, How Do I Get It Lower?

Using Low Carb Diet And Sugar Is Still High, How Do I Get It Lower?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Using low carb diet and sugar is still high, how do I get it lower? I have been diabetic type 2 for 15 years. Im now 48. I have been on a very low carb diet for the past 2 months. Ive been on insulin (lantus) for 2 years, I also take glyclazide and metformin. My sugar levels are only stabalized from the hours of 3pm to 6pm. Otherwise im always high. I do not eat after dinner till brekky most days. On the occasion I might have a protein snack, like nuts or cheese. When I exercise my sugar level rises. I have just upped my level of insulin and there has been no change. Im at my wits end. I don't know where im going wrong. I have spoken to my doc about this. He has said a side effect of insulin is weight gain, just do more exercise. Well its not working, my weight is rising.. Im barely eating any carbs. I eat lots of veggies and meat, I snack on nuts, seeds. The only fruit I eat are berries, the occasional apple. Hi and welcome to the forum. I'm tagging @daisy1 so that she can provide you with the standard information for newcomers. You say you are low carb - can you give us an idea of your intake for an average day so that we can maybe help you troubleshoot your diet? Have you tried using myfitnesspal or chono-meter to track you intake so that you can be sure you're sticking to the correct calorie limit for weight loss? You may find this nutritional calculator helpful: Sorry I can't help you with the insulin side of things, but hopefully someone else can. If you take a look around the low carb diet forum you may pick up some useful information also. Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it helpful. Ask as many questions Continue reading >>

What About High Blood Sugar On Low Carb?

What About High Blood Sugar On Low Carb?

December 21 2017 by Amanda kesson in About membership , Blood sugar , Cancer , Keto , Ketosis , Low Carb USA Miriam Kalamian answers questions related to cancer, the ketogenic diet and blood sugar after her presentation at the Low Carb USA conference in 2017. Watch a new part of the Q&A session above, where she answers a question about high blood sugar on low carb ( transcript ). The full video is available (with captions and transcript) with a free trial or membership: Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos . Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service . Learn how to do a keto diet right, in part 1 of our video course. What are some common side effects of a keto diet and how can you avoid them? What do you eat on a keto diet? Get the answer in part 3 of the keto course. How does a keto diet work? Learn all you need to know, in part 2 of the keto course. Could protein restriction on a low-carb or keto diet cause problems? What is the current science in support of a low-carb and keto diet? Is there such a thing as an optimal diet? And is a keto diet always the best option? What is it like running the very popular YouTube channel Keto Connect? How should we eat to fight the global mental health crisis? Should you NOT eat your vegetables? An interview with psychiatrist Dr. Georgia Ede. How can you make the transition to a low-carb or keto diet as smooth as possible? Is it possible to ride a pushbike across the Australian continent (2,100 miles) without eating carbs? Low-carb pioneer Dr. Eric Westman talks about how to formulate an LCHF diet, low carb for different medical conditions and common pitfalls among others. "I'll do this or I'm going to die trying" Kristie Sullivan struggled with her weigh Continue reading >>

Atkins Induction Diet Improves Glycemic Control In Diabetes

Atkins Induction Diet Improves Glycemic Control In Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease of uncontrolled sugar. In a nutshell, uncontrolled sugar is also a huge contributing factor to obesity and heart disease. When your blood sugar goes too high, insulin comes in to escort that extra blood sugar into the cells where it can be burned for energy. But if insulin doesn’t work effectively, you wind up with too much blood sugar and high levels of insulin and you’re on your way to big health problems down the road. The technical name for this ability of the body to regulate sugar effectively and efficiently is glycemic control. So what’s the number one thing that raises blood sugar anyway? Clearly it’s carbohydrate. And study after study has shown that low-carb diets improve the ability of the body to effectively deal with sugar. Previous research(1) has shown that a low-glycemic diet (i.e. one high in beans, lentils and breads made with flaxseeds) does much better at managing glycemic control for Type ll diabetes than the “traditional” high fiber diet based on whole grain breads and breakfast cereals (which are often loaded with extra sugar). Now a new study shows that when it comes to controlling blood sugar, the Atkins Induction phase program does even better. Eric Westman, MD and his research team put 84 community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes on one of two diets- either a very low carb (Atkins Induction Phase) or a low-glycemic, reduced calorie diet. After 6 months, there was improvement in both groups in glycemic control. But the Atkins Induction group improved more. The main measure of improvement was a blood test called hemoglobin A1c, which is a kind of “Rolls Royce” of blood sugar measurement. While blood sugar levels at any given time fluctuate, Hemoglobin A1c gives us a much more realistic reading of Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Is My Low Carb Diet Causing A False Pre Diabetes Diagnosis

Asknadia: Is My Low Carb Diet Causing A False Pre Diabetes Diagnosis

Dear Nadia, When you are loosing weight on a low carb diet, does this artificially inflate my pre-diabetes glucose test? Paula Corin Linnwood WA Dear Paula, Pre-diabetes statistics have been in the news for several years with great concern for our national population. It is great that you are staying on top of your health and paying attention to your diet to be one less number in the growing diabetes population. The annual increase in pre-diabetes diagnosis is growing at an alarming rate. In 2010, 79 million people were diagnosed with pre-diabetes. Two year later, in 2012, this number grew to 86 million people . The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports within a five year period, 15-30% of the people diagnosed with pre-diabetes will be be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This translates into anther 12.9 to 25.8 million people who are coming up through ranks with a diabetes diagnosis from 2012. What is Pre-diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your blood sugar test reads higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. Does a Low Carb Diet Give You a False Pre-diabetes Diagnosis If you take a glucose tolerance test and are eating under 300 carbs a day for three days prior to the test; yes you can get a false diabetes or pre-diabetes diagnosis. Typically when you eat food, the GLP-1 hormone in your body simulates the secretion of the insulin hormone to convert food into energy. With a low carb diet your body secrets less insulin and turns to your reserves to metabolize the fat for energy. Why You Get a False Pre-diabetes Diagnosis A low carb diet will create a slow uptake of insulin which shows a false elevated glucose. It metabolizes your fat reserves. Dr Richard Bernstein, a famous low carb diet advocate and a person with type 1, tells me we can Continue reading >>

The Low Carb Plan

The Low Carb Plan

Eating to control your weight and your blood sugar The Mediterranean-style low carb approach which we recommend in The Blood Sugar Diet, is low in starchy, easily digestible carbs, but packed full of disease-fighting vitamins and flavonoids. It is rich in olive oil, fish, nuts, fruit and vegetables, but also contains lots of lovely things that down the years we have been told not to eat, such as full fat yoghurt and eggs. Although it is derived from the eating habits of people living in Mediterranean countries, you can apply the principles of Med-style eating to a wide range of different cuisines, from Chinese or Indian through to Mexican or Scandanavian. There is extensive evidence for the benefit of the Mediterranean style low carbohydrate diet, including cutting your risk of heart disease and diabetes. It has even been found to reduce risk the risk of breast cancer, compared with those on a low-fat diet. Consuming extra virgin olive oil (the fresh squeezed juice of olives) seems to be particularly beneficial when it comes to cancer, perhaps because it contains compounds such as polyphenols which are known to be anti-inflammatory. “This is potentially a life changing book for people with raised blood sugar levels as well as those with type 2 diabetes” Dr Tim Spector, Professor of Genetics, Kings College, London Kick the Carbs: Low Carb Mediterranean Style Eating – The ‘M Plan’ Cut right down on sugar, sugary treats, drinks and desserts: No more than once or twice a week and preferably less. You can use sugar substitutes like stevia and xylitol, but try to wean yourself off your sweet tooth. Avoid sweet fruits: Berries, apples & pears are fine, but sweet tropical fruits such as mango, pineapple, melon and bananas are full of sugar. Minimise or avoid the starc Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

Will Low-carb Diets Cause Blood Sugar Levels To Drop?

Will Low-carb Diets Cause Blood Sugar Levels To Drop?

Video of the Day If you're accustomed to eating a very high-carb diet and suddenly switch to a very low-carb diet, you could experience rather dramatic drops in your blood sugar during the first few days or weeks of your transition. This low blood sugar can cause notably uncomfortable side effects and intense cravings. Carbs and Blood Sugar Your body converts consumed carbohydrates into glucose, a type of sugar. When the glucose enters your bloodstream, it leads to an increase in your blood sugar level. The pancreas produces insulin in response to spikes in blood sugar, which helps your body store the sugar for energy. This insulin release subsides when your cells absorb the sugar and your levels stabilize. In a healthy body, the surge of blood sugar and insulin is relatively moderate and keeps you evenly motoring through your day. When you eat lots of carbohydrates, your body's blood sugar remains consistently high and your system constantly pumps out insulin. This chronic elevation of blood sugar and release of insulin causes inflammation, an increase in fat storage and an inability to burn stored fat. Chronically high blood sugar levels increase your risk of disease, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. You crave carbohydrates regularly for energy, because your body isn't efficient at using stored fat for fuel. How a Low-Carb Diet Impacts Blood Sugar If you regularly consume a large amount of carbohydrates, especially refined ones like white bread and soda, you may experience a notable drop in blood sugar when you drastically reduce your carb intake. In the first week of carb reduction, your body will seek to maintain your high sugar intake. You'll crave carbohydrates and may even feel weak because your body hasn't yet become efficient at burning fat for fuel Continue reading >>

Low Carb For Diabetes

Low Carb For Diabetes

To celebrate World Diabetes Day, this is a guest post “Low Carb For Diabetes”, from an eminent Low Carb Diabetes Educator, Kelley Pounds RN. Kelley is a registered nurse, certified diabetes educator and certified insulin pump trainer that conducts a very successful diabetes education program in her community, specifically working with patients that have been unable to achieve their blood glucose and A1c goals with standard advice (Type 1 and Type 2). See below for details of her diabetes programs. Medical Disclaimer -Before embarking on any change in diet or activity, I highly recommend a physical exam and thorough healthcare screening with your primary healthcare provider. This article should not be construed as medical advice, nor should it be substituted for medical advice from your healthcare provider. By continuing to read this article, you assume all responsibilities and risks for instituting lifestyle management of your diabetes. Many with Diabetes are confused by the conflicting dietary advice they receive. And no wonder. The dietary advice given to those with diabetes has been extremely poor. For decades, people with diabetes have been told center their diet around carbohydrates, many being counseled to consume 250+ grams of carbohydrates per day. No person needs to consume 250+ grams of carbohydrates per day, let alone the very people who are unable to effectively process them, those with diabetes. Eating this much carbohydrates daily would mean that one would HAVE to be consuming a great deal of sugar or refined, processed foods. It would be extremely difficult to consume this amount of carbohydrates while EATING REAL FOOD. Further, many are told “calories from sugar can be substituted equally for other carbohydrates as part of a healthy balanced diet f Continue reading >>

Is Low-carb Eating Really Better For Blood Sugar?

Is Low-carb Eating Really Better For Blood Sugar?

A review of popular low-carbohydrate diets finds that while restricting carbs can reduce blood sugar in the short run, evidence in support of long-term benefits is lacking. While very low carbohydrate diets (LCD) promise to cut blood sugars, a review of popular LCDs finds that while very low-carb eating can reduce blood sugar in the short run, little evidence exists to show long-term benefits. The study, published online in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, reports that while LCDs may be “slightly better than low fat diets for weight and triglycerides management” they are “not superior for the management of blood glucose, blood pressure, or cholesterol levels.” However, researchers note that physicians should be aware that “available evidence for LCDs is limited because of variable definitions, lack of long-term studies, and lack of patient adherence.” Diets considered ranged from very low carb—less than 20 to 60 grams per day—to less restrictive diets that averaged about 130 grams per day. The American Diabetes Association says diets should be tailored to individual needs, but recommends starting at 45-60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. “Patients can likely follow a version of the low carbohydrate diet for longer than the studies suggest, but we don’t know the health effects of a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet of less than 20 grams of carbs per day,” says Heather Fields, MD, an author of the study and a doctor of integrative medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona. “With so few people adhering to a truly ketogenic diet long term [more than a year], we will likely never be able to study the health effects in a meaningful way.” Dr. Fields finds that if type 2 patients have not had success with a plant-based, who Continue reading >>

Benefits Of A Low Carb Diet

Benefits Of A Low Carb Diet

A low carb diet has many benefits for people with diabetes Putting type 2 into remission with low carb There are a number of benefits of low carb diets which can be particularly beneficial for people with diabetes. We take a look at why low carbohydrate diets have become popular amongst a significant number of people with diabetes. Generally speaking, the more carbohydrate we eat, the higher our blood glucose levels are going to be following eating. If your after meal numbers are higher than youd like them to be, reducing the carbohydrate content of meals can help to lower your post prandial (after meal) blood test readings . Research studies have consistently found that low carbohydrate diets provide significant improvements in blood glucose control. By reducing hyperglycemia, short term symptoms such as thirst and needing to frequently urinate can be minimised and if strong diabetes control can be maintained. The risks of developing diabetic complications can also be reduced. Carbohydrate is often viewed as an energy giving macronutrient but thats only the case if your insulin can keep up. If insulin cant keep up, and this is more likely in people with type 2 diabetes, then our blood glucose levels go too high and we can end up feeling tired and lethargic. By starting a low carbohydrate diet, you may also be lowering your daily calorie intake. As a result, some people may experience more tiredness than usual shortly after starting a low carb diet, but this effect usually passes after the first 2 weeks of the diet as the body adapts to the new diet. If a low carb diet achieves the desired effect of improving blood sugar levels, it can help to relieve brain fog which can occur when blood sugar levels are too high. Brain fog is characterised by an inability to think cle Continue reading >>

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

This past spring, after 18 months of great success on the keto diet, I tested my fasting blood sugar on my home glucose monitor for the first time in many months. The result shocked me. I had purchased the device, which also tests ketones, when I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in the fall of 2015. As I embarked on low-carb keto eating, I tested my blood regularly. Soon my fasting blood sugar was once again in the healthy range. I was in optimal ketosis day after day. Not only that, I lost 10 lbs (5 kg) and felt fantastic — full of energy with no hunger or cravings. Before long I could predict the meter’s results based on what I was eating or doing. I put the meter away and got on with my happy, healthy keto life. When my doctor ordered some lab tests this spring, I brought the meter out again. While I had no health complaints, excellent blood pressure and stable weight, she wanted to see how my cholesterol, lipids, HbA1c, and fasting glucose were doing on my keto diet — and I was curious, too. To check the accuracy of my meter against the lab results, on the morning of the test I sat in my car outside the clinic at 7:30 am, and pricked my finger. I was expecting to see a lovely fasting blood glucose (FBG) of 4.7 or 4.8 mmol/l (85 mg/dl). It was 5.8! (103 mg/dl). What? I bailed on the tests and drove home — I didn’t want my doctor warning me I was pre-diabetic again when I had no explanation for that higher result. The next morning I tested again: 5.9! (104). Huh??? For the next two weeks I tested every morning. No matter what I did, my FBG would be in 5.7 to 6.0 (102 to 106 mg/dl), the pre-diabetic range again. One morning after a restless sleep it was even 6.2 mmol/l (113 mg/dl). But my ketones were still reading an optimal 1.5-2.5 mmol/l. I was still burnin Continue reading >>

Effect Of A High-protein, Low-carbohydrate Diet On Blood Glucose Control In People With Type 2 Diabetes

Effect Of A High-protein, Low-carbohydrate Diet On Blood Glucose Control In People With Type 2 Diabetes

There has been interest in the effect of various types and amounts of dietary carbohydrates and proteins on blood glucose. On the basis of our previous data, we designed a high-protein/low-carbohydrate, weight-maintaining, nonketogenic diet. Its effect on glucose control in people with untreated type 2 diabetes was determined. We refer to this as a low-biologically-available-glucose (LoBAG) diet. Eight men were studied using a randomized 5-week crossover design with a 5-week washout period. The carbohydrate:protein:fat ratio of the control diet was 55:15:30. The test diet ratio was 20:30:50. Plasma and urinary β-hydroxybutyrate were similar on both diets. The mean 24-h integrated serum glucose at the end of the control and LoBAG diets was 198 and 126 mg/dl, respectively. The percentage of glycohemoglobin was 9.8 ± 0.5 and 7.6 ± 0.3, respectively. It was still decreasing at the end of the LoBAG diet. Thus, the final calculated glycohemoglobin was estimated to be ∼6.3–5.4%. Serum insulin was decreased, and plasma glucagon was increased. Serum cholesterol was unchanged. Thus, a LoBAG diet ingested for 5 weeks dramatically reduced the circulating glucose concentration in people with untreated type 2 diabetes. Potentially, this could be a patient-empowering way to ameliorate hyperglycemia without pharmacological intervention. The long-term effects of such a diet remain to be determined. Data obtained in our laboratory (1–3) as well as from others (reviewed in 4) indicate that glucose that is absorbed after the digestion of glucose-containing foods is largely responsible for the rise in the circulating glucose concentration after ingestion of mixed meals. Dietary proteins, fats, and absorbed fructose and galactose resulting from the digestion of sucrose and lactose, Continue reading >>

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